List of Intelsat satellites

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This is a list of satellites operated by Intelsat, Ltd..

Intelsat brand[edit]

Generations 1-4 (1965–1978)[edit]

Satellite Launch (UTC)[1] Rocket Launch Site Longitude[2] Fate Out of Service Remarks

First generation[edit]

Intelsat I F-1 1965-04-06
23:47:50
Delta D Canaveral LC-17A 28°W Retired First commercial geosynchronous satellite
Intelsat I F-2 Not launched[citation needed]

Second generation[edit]

Intelsat II F-1 1966-10-26
23:05:00
Delta E1 Canaveral LC-17B N/A Retired Apogee motor failed, satellite operated from transfer orbit[citation needed]
Intelsat II F-2 1967-01-11
10:55:00
Delta E1 Canaveral LC-17B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat II F-3 1967-03-23
01:30:12
Delta E1 Canaveral LC-17B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat II F-4 1967-09-28
00:45:00
Delta E1 Canaveral LC-17B Retired [citation needed]

Third generation[edit]

Intelsat III F-1 1968-09-19
00:09:00
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Failed Delta control failure. Vehicle began breaking up at T+102 seconds followed by RSO destruct T+108 seconds.
Intelsat III F-2 1968-12-19
00:32:00
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Failed Operated for one and a half years[citation needed]
Intelsat III F-3 1969-02-06
00:39:00
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Retired Operated for seven years[citation needed]
Intelsat III F-4 1969-06-22
02:00:00
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Failed Operated for three years[citation needed]
Intelsat III F-5 1969-07-26
02:06:00
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Failed Launch failure, third stage malfunction[citation needed]
Intelsat III F-6 1970-01-15
00:16:03
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Failed Operated for two years[citation needed]
Intelsat III F-7 1970-04-23
00:46:12
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Retired Operated for sixteen years
Intelsat III F-8 1970-07-23
23:23:00
Delta M Canaveral LC-17A Failed Apogee motor failed[citation needed]

Fourth generation[edit]

Block 1[edit]
Intelsat IV F-1 1975-05-21
22:04:00
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1A Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IV F-2 1971-01-26
00:36:03
Atlas SLV-3C Centaur-D Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IV F-3 1971-12-20
01:10:04
Atlas SLV-3C Centaur-D Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IV F-4 1972-01-23
00:12:04
Atlas SLV-3C Centaur-D Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IV F-5 1972-06-13
21:53:04
Atlas SLV-3C Centaur-D Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IV F-6 1975-02-20
23:35:00
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1A Canaveral LC-36A Failed Launch failure. Improper separation of a lanyard during booster jettison caused the Atlas's guidance computer to reset itself. Control of the booster was gradually lost. RSO T+403 seconds.
Intelsat IV F-7 1973-08-23
22:57:02
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1A Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IV F-8 1974-11-21
23:43:59
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1A Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Block 2[edit]
Intelsat IVA F-1 1975-09-26
00:17:00
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IVA F-2 1976-01-29
23:56
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IVA F-3 1978-01-07
00:15:00
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IVA F-4 1977-05-26
21:47:01
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat IVA F-5 1977-09-30
01:02:59
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36A Failed Launch failure. Gas generator leak caused a fire in the Atlas's engine compartment leading to loss of control starting at T+30 seconds. Payload fairing and satellite were stripped away, followed by vehicle breakup at T+55 seconds. The Centaur was ejected from the exploding booster intact and the destruct command was sent to it a few seconds later.
Intelsat IVA F-6 1978-03-31
23:36:01
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]

Generations 5-6 (1980–1991)[edit]

Satellite Launch (UTC)[1] Rocket Launch Site Longitude[2] Fate Out of Service Remarks

Fifth generation[edit]

Block 1[edit]
Intelsat V F-1 1981-05-23
22:42
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-2 1980-12-06
23:31
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-3 1981-12-15
23:35
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-4 1982-03-05
00:23
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-5 1982-09-28
23:17
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-6 1983-05-19
22:26
Atlas SLV-3D Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36A Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-7 1983-10-19
00:45:36
Ariane 1 Kourou ELA-1 Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-8 1984-03-05
00:50:03
Ariane 1 Kourou ELA-1 Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat V F-9 1984-06-09
23:03
Atlas G Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Failed Launch failure. Centaur broke up in orbit, making it impossible for the satellite to attain its intended altitude.
Block 2[edit]
Intelsat VA F-10 1985-03-22
23:55
Atlas G Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat VA F-11 1985-06-30
00:44
Atlas G Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat VA F-12 1985-09-28
23:17
Atlas G Centaur-D1AR Canaveral LC-36B Retired [citation needed]
Intelsat VA F-13 1988-05-17
23:58:00
Ariane 2 Kourou ELA-1 Sold To New Skies as NSS-513[citation needed]
Intelsat VA F-14 1986-05-31
00:53:03
Ariane 2 Kourou ELA-1 Failed Launch failure, third stage failed to ignite[citation needed]
Intelsat VA F-15 1989-01-27
01:21:00
Ariane 2 Kourou ELA-1 Sold To Columbia Communications Corporation as Columbia 515

Sixth generation[edit]

Intelsat 601 1991-10-29
23:08:08
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 Sold 2007-10 to Europe*Star, decommissioned in 2011[3]
Intelsat 602 1989-10-17
23:05:00
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 Active
Intelsat 603 1990-03-14
11:52
Commercial Titan III Canaveral LC-40 Retired 2013-01 Launch failure. Titan second stage failed to separate from the Centaur, leaving the Intelsat in LEO. Reboosted by Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-49
Intelsat 604 1990-06-23
11:19
Commercial Titan III Canaveral LC-40 Retired 2006-04-06[4]
Intelsat 605 1991-08-14
23:15:13
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 Retired 2009-01[5]

Generations 7-10 (1993–2004)[edit]

Satellite Launch (UTC)[1] Rocket Launch Site Longitude[2] Fate Out of Service Remarks

Seventh generation[edit]

Intelsat 701 1993-10-22
06:46:00
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 29.5°W Inclined orbit
Intelsat 702 1994-06-17
07:07:19
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 32.9°E Inclined orbit
Intelsat 703 1994-10-06
06:35:02
Atlas IIAS Canaveral LC-36B Sold To New Skies as NSS-703
Intelsat 704 1995-01-10
06:18
Atlas IIAS Canaveral LC-36B Retired
Intelsat 705 1995-03-22
06:18
Atlas IIAS Canaveral LC-36B Retired 2011-02-01
Intelsat 706 1995-05-17
06:34:00
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 Retired
Intelsat 707 1996-03-14
07:11:01
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 Retired
Intelsat 708 1996-02-14
19:01
Long March 3B Xichang LA-2 Failed Launch failure, carrier rocket went out of control two seconds after launch
Intelsat 709 1996-06-15
06:55:09
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 Retired

Eighth generation[edit]

Intelsat 801 1997-03-01
01:07:42
Ariane 44P Kourou ELA-2
Intelsat 802 1997-06-25
23:44:00
Ariane 44P Kourou ELA-2 33°E
Intelsat 803 1997-09-23
23:58
Ariane 42L Kourou ELA-2 Sold To New Skies as NSS-803, later NSS-5
Intelsat 804 1997-12-22
00:16
Ariane 42L Kourou ELA-2 Failed 2005-01-15
Intelsat 805 1998-06-18
22:48
Atlas IIAS Canaveral SLC-36A 169°E Active
Intelsat 806 1998-02-28
00:21
Atlas IIAS Canaveral SLC-36B Sold To New Skies as NSS-806

Ninth generation[edit]

Intelsat 901 2001-06-09
06:46
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 18°W Active
Intelsat 902 2001-08-30
06:46
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 62°E Active
Intelsat 903 2002-03-30
17:25:00
Proton-K / DM3 Baikonur Site 81/23 34.5°W Active Will be replaced by Intelsat 35e in 2017[6]
Intelsat 904 2002-02-23
06:59
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 60°E Active Will be replaced by Intelsat 33e in 2016[7]
Intelsat 905 2002-06-05
06:44
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 24.5°W Active
Intelsat 906 2002-09-06
06:44
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 64.15°E Active
Intelsat 907 2003-02-15
07:00
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 27.5°W Active

Tenth generation[edit]

Intelsat 10-01 Not launched
Intelsat 10-02 2004-06-16
22:27:00
Proton-M / Briz-M Baikonur Site 200/39 1°W Active


Rebranded PanAmSat constellation (1994–2007)[edit]

Satellite Launch (UTC)[1] Rocket Launch Site Longitude[2] Fate Out of Service Remarks
Intelsat 1R 2000-11-16
01:07:07
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 45°W (2000–2010)
50°W (since 2010)
Retired ex PAS-1R of PanAmSat. Replaced by Intelsat 14 at 45°W in 2010 and moved to 50°W, where it was finally replaced by Intelsat 29e in 2016
Intelsat 2 1994-07-08
23:05:32
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 ex PAS-2 of PanAmSat
Intelsat 3R 1996-01-12
23:10:00
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 ex PAS-3R of PanAmSat
Intelsat 4 1996-08-03
22:58:00
Ariane 42L Kourou ELA-2 ex PAS-4 of PanAmSat
Intelsat 5 1997-08-28
00:33:30
Proton-K / DM3 Baikonur Site 81/23 157°E Leased ex PAS-5 of PanAmSat, leased to Arabsat as Arabsat 2C and Badr-C. Battery degradation reduced capacity by over 50%.
Intelsat 6B 1998-12-22
01:08
Ariane 42L Kourou ELA-2 ex PAS-6 of PanAmSat, XIPS failed in 2003
Intelsat 7 1998-09-16
06:31
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 Active ex PAS-7 of PanAmSat, power system anomaly
Intelsat 8 1998-11-04
05:12:00
Proton-K / DM3 Baikonur Site 81/23 169°E Active ex PAS-8 of PanAmSat
Intelsat 9 2000-07-28
22:42:00
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 43.1°W Inclined orbit ex PAS-9 of PanAmSat
Intelsat 10 2001-05-15
01:11:30
Proton-K / DM3 Baikonur Site 81/23 47.5°E Inclined orbit ex PAS-10 of PanAmSat
Intelsat 11 2007-10-05
22:02
Ariane 5GS Kourou ELA-3 43°W Active ex PAS-11 of PanAmSat
Intelsat 12 2000-10-29
05:59
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 45°E Active ex Europe*Star 1 or Loral Skynet, PAS-12 of PanAmSat


Recent spacecraft (since 2009)[edit]

Satellite Launch (UTC)[1] Rocket Launch Site Longitude[2] Fate Out of Service Remarks
Intelsat 14 2009-11-23 Atlas V 431 Canaveral SLC-41 45°W Active Replaced Intelsat 1R
Intelsat 15 2009-11-30 Zenit-3SLB Baikonur Site 45/1 85.15°E Active Shared with JSAT as JCSAT-85[8]
Intelsat 16 2010-02-12 Proton-M / Briz-M Baikonur Site 200/39 58.1°W Active Launched, ex PAS-11R of PanAmSat
Intelsat 17 2010-11-26 Ariane 5 ECA
V-198 (556)
Kourou ELA-3 66°E Active
Intelsat 18 2011-10-05 Zenit-3SLB Baikonur 180°E Active
Intelsat 19 2012-06-01 Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 166°E Active Second solar panel failed to deploy
Intelsat 20 2012-08-02 Ariane 5 ECA
VA-208 (564)
Kourou ELA-3 68.5°E Active
Intelsat 21 2012-08-19 Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 58°W Active
Intelsat 22 2012-03-25 Proton-M / Briz-M Baikonur 72.1°E Active
Intelsat 23 2012-10-14 Proton-M / Briz-M Baikonur 53°W Active
Intelsat 24 1996-05-16 Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 31°E Retired ex Amos-1 of Spacecom, acquired in 2009[9]
Intelsat 25 2008-07-07 Ariane 5 ECA
V-184 (541)
Kourou ELA-3 31.5°W Active ex ProtoStar 1 of ProtoStar, acquired in October 2009[10]
Intelsat 26 1997-02-12 Atlas IIA Canaveral LC-36B 62.6°E Inclined orbit ex JCSat-R of SKY Perfect JSAT Group, acquired in 2009, leased to Turksat[11]
Intelsat 27 2013-02-01
06:56
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 55°W (planned) Failed N/A Launch failure
Intelsat 28
(New Dawn)
2011-04-22
21:37
Ariane 5 ECA
VA-201 (558)
Kourou 32.8°E Active ex New Dawn[12]
Intelsat 29e 2016-01-27
23:20
Ariane 5 ECA
VA-228 (583)
Kourou 50°W Active First in EpicNG series over twice the weight of preceding generation, featuring multi beam and all digital design with 3-5 times the capacity and 10 times the throughput.[13] Replaced Intelsat 1R.
Intelsat 30
(DLA-1)
2014-10-16
21:43
Ariane 5 ECA
VA-220 (574)
Kourou 95°W[14] Active Operated by Intelsat for DirecTV Latin America (DLA)[15]
Intelsat 31
(DLA-2)
2016-06-09
21:43
Proton-M / Briz-M Baikonur 132°W[16] Active Operated by Intelsat for DirecTV Latin America (DLA)[15]
Intelsat 32e
(SKY-B1)
2017
(TBD)
Ariane 5 ECA
Kourou 43°W[17] Planned Operated by Intelsat for SKY Brasil. Part of EpicNG series.[17]
Intelsat 33e 2016-08-24
22:16
Ariane 5 ECA
VA-232 (586)
Kourou 60°E Commissioning Second EpicNG.[18] Will replace Intelsat 904[7]
Intelsat 34 2015-08-20
20:34
Ariane 5 ECA
VA-225 (579)
Kourou 55.5°W Active [19]
Intelsat 35e Q1, 2017[20]
(TBD)
Falcon 9 Full Thrust[20] Cape Canaveral 34.5°W[21] Planned Third EpicNG slated to launch. Will replace Intelsat 903[6]
Intelsat 36 2016-08-24
22:16
Ariane 5 ECA
VA-232 (586)
Kourou 68.5°E Commissioning [18]
Intelsat 38
(Azerspace 2)
2017
(TBD)
Ariane 5 ECA
Kourou 45°E[22] Planned Operated by Intelsat for Azercosmos.[22]
Intelsat 39  ?  ?  ? 62°E[23] Planned [23]

Other brands[edit]

Satellite Launch (UTC)[1] Rocket Launch Site Longitude[2] Fate Out of Service Remarks

Galaxy (Intelsat Americas, 1992–2008)[edit]

Galaxy 3C 2002-06-15
22:39:30
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 95.05°W Active ex PAS-9, Galaxy 13 of PanAmSat
Galaxy 4R 2000-04-19
00:29
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 76.85°W Failed April 2009 XIPS malfunction[24]
Galaxy 5 1992-05-14
17:32:41
Atlas V Cape Canaveral 125°W Retired January 2005[25]
Galaxy 9 1996-05-24
01:09:59
Delta II 7925 Cape Canaveral LC-17B 81°W Retired June 2010[26]
Galaxy 10R 2000-01-25
01:04
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 123°W Failed June 2008 XIPS malfunction[27]
Galaxy 11 1999-12-22
00:50
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 55.6°W Active Reduced power due to solar reflector fogging
Galaxy 12 2003-04-09
22:52:19
Ariane 5G Kourou ELA-3 129°W Active [citation needed]
Galaxy 13 See Horizons-1[28]
Galaxy 14 2005-08-13
23:28:26
Soyuz-FG/Fregat Baikonur Site 31/6 125°W Active ex Galaxy 5R[citation needed]
Galaxy 15 2005-10-13
22:32
Ariane 5GS Kourou ELA-3 133°W Active ex Galaxy 1RR; Transmits WAAS
Suffered uncontrolled drift in 2010[29]
Galaxy 16 2006-06-18
07:50
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 99°W Active
Galaxy 17 2007-05-04
22:29
Ariane 5ECA Kourou ELA-3 91°W Active
Galaxy 18 2008-05-21
09:43
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 133°W Active
Galaxy 19 2008-09-24
09:28
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 97°W Active ex Intelsat Americas 9
Galaxy 23 2003-08-08
03:30:55
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 121°W Active Part of EchoStar IX spacecraft. ex Telstar 13 of Space Systems Loral, Intelsat Americas 13
Galaxy 25 1997-05-24
17:00:00
Proton-K/DM4 Baikonur Site 81/23 93.1°W Active ex Telstar 5 of Space Systems Loral, Intelsat Americas 5
Galaxy 26 1999-02-15
05:12:00
Proton-K/DM3 Baikonur Site 81/23 50°E Retired[30] 7 June 2014[31] ex Telstar 6 of Space Systems Loral, Intelsat Americas 6
Galaxy 27 1999-09-25
06:29
Ariane 44LP Kourou ELA-2 66°E Retired[32] ex Telstar 7 of Space Systems Loral, Intelsat Americas 7
Galaxy 28 2005-06-23
14:03:00
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 89°W Active ex Telstar 8 of Space Systems Loral, Intelsat Americas 8

Horizons (since 2003)[edit]

Horizons satellites are operated by Horizons Satellite, a joint subsidiary of Intelsat and SKY Perfect JSAT Group

Horizons-1 2003-10-01
04:02:59
Zenit-3SL Ocean Odyssey 127°W Active Also designated Galaxy 13[28]
Horizons-2 2007-12-21
21:41:55
Ariane 5GS Kourou ELA-3 84.85°E Active
Horizons-3e 2019 (TBD) 169°E Planned Part of the EpicNG family. Will cover the Asia/Pacific region.[33][34][35]

Intelsat APR (1998–1999)[edit]

Intelsat APR designations are given to leased capacity on satellites which are not owned by Intelsat

Intelsat APR-1 1998-07-18
09:20
Long March 3B Xichang LA-2 146°E Retired[36] Leased capacity on Sinosat-1
Intelsat APR-2 1999-04-02
22:03
Ariane 42P Kourou ELA-2 83°E Retired[37] Leased capacity on INSAT-2E
Intelsat APR-3 See Intelsat K-TV

Intelsat K (1992)[edit]

Intelsat K 1992-06-10
00:00
Atlas IIA Canaveral LC-36B 21.5°W Retired August 2002[38] ex Satcom K4 of GE Americom, transferred to spin-off New Skies as NSS-K
Intelsat K-TV Not launched, to[clarification needed] New Skies as NSS-K-TV, NSS-6, to Sinosat as Sinosat-1B with transponders for lease back to Intelsat as APR-3, to HellasSat as HellasSat 2 before launch in 2003

Miscellaneous (1976, 1990)[edit]

Marisat-F2 1976-10-14 Delta 2914 Canaveral LC-17A 176°E (1976–1991)
178°W (1991–1996)
33.9°W (1999–2008)
Retired October 2008[39] Ex COMSAT, acquired from Lockheed Martin
SBS-6 1990-10-12
22:58:18
Ariane 44L Kourou ELA-2 80.9°W Retired February 2009[40] ex Satellite Business Systems

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-08-25. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Intelsat Satellite Fleet". Intelsat. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "Intelsat 601". The Satellite Encyclopedia. tbs Internet. 3 July 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2012. 
  4. ^ "Intelsat 604". The Satellite Encyclopedia. tbs Internet. 3 July 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2012. 
  5. ^ "Intelsat 605". The Satellite Encyclopedia. tbs Internet. 3 July 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter. "Intelsat 35e". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Clark, Stephen (August 24, 2016). "Intelsat celebrates double success with Ariane 5 launch". Spaceflight Now. Retrieved August 25, 2016. 
  8. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-21). "Intelsat 15 (JCSat 85)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  9. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "Amos-1 -> Intelsat 24". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  10. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "ProtoStar 1 -> Intelsat 25". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  11. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "JCSat 3, 4 (JCSat R) -> Intelsat 26". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 9 May 2010. 
  12. ^ Ariane abort produces fire and smoke, but no blastoff, Spaceflight Now, 30 March 2011, accessed 2011-04-01.
  13. ^ http://www.intelsat.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Intelsat_EpicNG_brochure.pdf
  14. ^ https://www.satbeams.com/satellites?norad=40271
  15. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter. "Intelsat 30, 31 / DLA 1, 2". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  16. ^ https://www.satbeams.com/satellites?norad=41581
  17. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter. "Intelsat 32e (SKY-Brasil 1)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 25 August 2016. 
  18. ^ a b Bergin, Chris (August 24, 2016). "Ariane 5 sets new record via the lofting of Intelsat pair". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 2016-08-24. 
  19. ^ Loguidice, Michele (20 August 2015). "Intelsat Announces Successful Launch of Intelsat 34" (Press release). Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  20. ^ a b Clark, Stephen (30 August 2016). "SES agrees to launch satellite on 'flight-proven' Falcon 9 rocket". Spaceflight Now. Intelsat, one of the world’s largest geostationary satellite operators alongside SES, has one launch reserved on a newly-built Falcon 9 rocket in the first quarter of 2017, when the Intelsat 35e satellite will launch from Cape Canaveral. 
  21. ^ http://www.intelsat.com/global-network/satellites/launch-schedule/
  22. ^ a b "Azerspace 2". SatBeams. Retrieved 21 September 2016. 
  23. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter. "Intelsat 39". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 21 September 2016. 
  24. ^ "Galaxy 4R". The Satellite Encyclopedia. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  25. ^ "Galaxy 5". The Satellite Encyclopedia. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  26. ^ "Galaxy 9". The Satellite Encyclopedia. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  27. ^ "Galaxy 10R". The Satellite Encyclopedia. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  28. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter. "Galaxy 13 / Horizons 1". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  29. ^ Choi, Charles Q. (3 May 2010). "Out-of-Control Satellite Threatens Other Nearby Spacecraft". space.com. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  30. ^ "Galaxy 26". Satbeams. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  31. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "Telstar 5, 6, 7 → Intelsat Americas 5, 6, 7 → Galaxy 25, 26, 27". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  32. ^ "Galaxy 27". Satbeams. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  33. ^ Krebs, Gunter Dirk (2016-04-21). "Horizons 3e". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2016-07-20. 
  34. ^ "SKY Perfect JSAT and Intelsat to Bring High Throughput Capacity to Asia Pacific to Meet Growing Mobility and Broadband Demands" (PDF). SKY Perfect JSAT Group & Intelsat. November 4, 2015. Retrieved 2016-07-28. 
  35. ^ Magan, Veronica (November 4, 2015). "Intelsat, JSAT Partner for Horizon 3e High Throughput Satellite for Asia Pacific". Retrieved 2016-07-28. 
  36. ^ "ChinaSat 5B". Satbeams. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  37. ^ "Insat 2E". Satbeams. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  38. ^ "Intelsat K". The Satellite Encyclopedia. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 
  39. ^ "Outliving expectations: Marisat-F2 satellite held on for 32 years, served South Pole for 8". Spaceref.com. Retrieved 2016-02-26. 
  40. ^ "SBS 6". The Satellite Encyclopedia. Retrieved 1 August 2016.