List of Interstate Highways in Ohio

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I-71.svgI-277.svg
Highway markers for Interstates 71 and 277
A map of all the Interstate Highways in Ohio
System information
Length: 1,572.35 mi[2] (2,530.45 km)
Formed: June 29, 1956[1]
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate nn (I-nn)
Business Loops: Business Loop Interstate nn (BL I-nn)
System links

There are a total of 21 Interstate Highways in Ohio, including both primary and auxiliary routes. All of the Interstates are owned and maintained by the state of Ohio; however, they were all built with money from the U.S. federal government.[3] The road miles of these 21 Interstates add up to a total of 1,572.35 miles (2,530.45 km). Ohio has more route miles than this, most of which comes from Interstate 80 being concurrent with Interstate 90 for 142.80 miles (229.81 km). The Interstate Highways in Ohio range in length from Interstate 71, at 248.15 miles (399.36 km), all the way down to Interstate 471, at 0.73 miles (1.17 km).[2]

As of 2006, out of all the states, Ohio has the fourth-largest Interstate Highway System. Ohio also has the fifth-largest traffic volume and the third-largest quantity of truck traffic. Ohio ranks second in the nation in terms of the number of bridges for its Interstate Highway System.[1]

On June 29, 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal Aid Highway Act, which called for the construction of up to 41,000 miles (66,000 km) of Interstate Highways. Of that, up to 1,500 miles (2,400 km) were to be built in Ohio. The same year, Ohio passed a law which raised the state's speed limit to 60 mph (97 km/h), and in 1957, Ohio began the construction of its Interstate Highway allotment. By 1958, Ohio had spent more money on its Interstate Highways than either New York or California. In 1960, Ohio had completed the construction of 522 miles (840 km) of pavement; in 1962, Ohio had completed the construction of 684 miles (1,101 km) of pavement; and in 1970, Ohio had completed the construction of 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of pavement. By the end of 1971, Ohio had only 167 miles (269 km) of interstate still to build. On September 19, 2003, Ohio finally finished the originally planned Interstate Highway System.[1]

Primary highway list[edit]

Highway Location Major cities served[4] Length (mi)[2] Length (km) Description References
I‑70 Preble, Montgomery, Clark, Madison, Franklin, Fairfield, Licking, Muskingum, Guernsey, and Belmont counties Columbus, Dayton, Springfield, and Wheeling 225.60 363.07 I-70 enters the state from Wheeling, West Virginia in the east and heads west across the whole state of Ohio. Along the way, it first intersects with I-77. I-70 then travels west until it nears Columbus, where it intersects with the eastern portion of I-270. I-70 then travels into the Columbus metropolitan area, and I-71 comes in from the north and becomes concurrent with I-70. For about 1.8 miles (2.9 km), the I-70 and I-71 travel together, and I-71 then leaves towards the south. I-670 then merges into I-70 from the north. After that, I-70 passes out of the Columbus area and intersects again with I-270, but this time on the western side of its loop. Continuing west, I-70 intersects with I-675 on its northern terminus, and then I-70 intersects I-75 north of Dayton. I-70 continues west to finally exit Ohio on its western border. [5][6]
I‑71 Hamilton, Warren, Clinton, Greene, Fayette, Madison, Pickaway, Franklin, Delaware, Morrow, Richland, Ashland, Wayne, Medina, and Cuyahoga counties Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, and Mansfield 248.15 399.36 I-71 begins in Cleveland at its intersection with I-490. It then heads southwest, intersecting I-480 and then I-80. I-271 splits off to the east, as does I-76 soon after. I-71 continues southwest until it reaches Columbus, where it intersects I-270 from the north. In the Columbus metropolitan area, I-71 intersects I-670 from the north, and then becomes concurrent with I-70 and heads east for around 1.8 miles (2.9 km) before splitting off to the south. I-71 then exits the Columbus area and intersects the I-270 loop again south of Columbus. I-71 then enters the Cincinnati area from the north, intersecting I-275, and continues southwest until I-471 branches off towards the southeast. I-71 then becomes concurrent with I-75 for about .3 miles (0.48 km) before finally exiting Ohio south of Cincinnati. [7][8]
I‑74 Hamilton County Cincinnati 19.47 31.33 I-74 begins at its terminus with I-75 in Cincinnati. It heads northwest and becomes concurrent with I-275 for about 2.7 miles (4.3 km). I-275 then breaks off and heads southwest, whereas I-74 continues northwest until it passes out of Ohio on its western border. [9][10]
I‑75 Hamilton, Butler, Warren, Montgomery, Miami, Shelby, Auglaize, Allen, Hancock, Wood, and Lucas counties Cincinnati, Dayton, Lima, Middletown, and Toledo 211.30 340.05 I-75 enters Ohio from Michigan just north of Toledo. It heads south, and then I-280 breaks off and heads south in a slightly more easternly direction than I-75. I-75 continues south and intersects I-90, and then I-475 breaks off to the west. I-75 passes out of the Toledo area and travels south until it reaches the Dayton area, where it intersects I-70 just north of Dayton. Once south of Dayton, I-675 branches off to the east, and I-75 continues south to Cincinnati, where it intersects I-275 from the north. I-74 then branches off to the northwest, and I-75 continues south until it is just south of Cincinnati, where it becomes concurrent with I-71 for around .3 miles (0.48 km) before finally passing out of Ohio on its southern border. [11][12]
I‑76 Medina, Summit, Portage, and Mahoning counties Akron, Warren, and Youngstown 81.65 131.40 I-76 enters Ohio from the east, just south of Youngstown. I-680 branches off to the north, and I-76 continues northwest until it reaches I-80. In this intersection, I-80 enters from the east and I-76 from the southeast, but I-80 leaves to the northwest and I-76 to the west. This effectively exchanges the labeling for I-76 and I-80. I-76 travels west until it becomes concurrent with I-77 for about 2.8 miles (4.5 km) in Akron. I-76 then breaks off to the south, and I-77 goes north. I-76 soon turns back to the west at its intersection with the western terminus of I-277 and continues west until it reaches its terminus on I-71. [13][14][15]
I‑77 Washington, Noble, Guernsey, Tuscarawas, Stark, Summit, and Cuyahoga counties Akron, Canton, and Cleveland 160.13 257.70 At its northern terminus, I-77 branches off of I-90 in Cleveland. It then heads south, intersecting I-490, then I-480, then I-80, and then I-271. At Akron, I-77 cecomes concurrent with I-76 and goes east for around 2.8 miles (4.5 km), before splitting off again to the south. It then intersects I-277 before heading farther south. In southeastern Ohio, I-77 intersects I-70 and continues south until it finally exits Ohio on its southern border. [16][17]
I‑80 Concurrent with I-90 in Williams, Fulton, Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie, and Lorain counties; independent in Cuyahoga, Summit, Portage, Trumbull and Mahoning counties Akron, Cleveland, Elyria, Lorain, Toledo, Warren, and Youngstown 237.48 382.19 I-80 enters Ohio east of Warren. Southeast of Warren, I-680 merges with I-80 from the southeast. Continuing west, I-80 intersects I-76 and switches its direction to the northwest. I-80 turns west again and then intersects I-480 at its southern terminus. I-80 continues west-northwest, intersecting I-271, I-77, and I-71 in that order. Continuing west, I-80 again intersects I-480, only this time at its northern terminus. I-90 then comes in from the northeast and becomes concurrent with I-80 via the Ohio Turnpike Connector. The concurrent I-80 and I-90 continue west until they reach the area just south of Toledo, where I-280 branches off to the north. I-80 and I-90 then intersect I-75 and I-475 before continuing west to Ohio's western border, where they pass out into Indiana. [18][19]
I‑90 Concurrent with I-80 in Williams, Fulton, Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie, and Lorain counties; independent in Cuyahoga, Lake, and Ashtabula counties Cleveland, Elyria, Lorain, and Toledo 244.75 393.89 I-90 enters Ohio's eastern border about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Lake Erie and travels southwest inland from the shore of lake Erie. I-90 then branches off onto a new highway heading west, and the original highway continues as I-271. I-90 then becomes concurrent with Ohio State Route 2 for 10.7 miles (17.2 km) and continues southwest into Cleveland. In Cleveland, I-90 and SR-2 break apart, with SR-2 heading southwest and I-90 heading south. I-90 soon turns back to the southwest, and I-77 branches off to the south. I-90 then comes into an intersection where three highways meet: I-90 from the north, I-71 from the south, and I-490 from the east. I-90 leaves this cloverleaf intersection towards the west. Eventually, I-90 and SR-2 become concurrent again for 17.2 miles (27.7 km). They split apart again, with I-90 leaving SR-2 on the Ohio Turnpike Connector to become concurrent with I-80 until they leave the state. Near Toledo, I-280 branches off to the north. I-75 then intersects I-90, followed by I-475. The I-90 and I-80 highway then continues west until it passes out of the state. [20][21]

Auxiliary highway list[edit]

A list of the auxiliary interstate routes in Ohio.[22]

Highway Location Major cities served[4] Length (mi)[2] Length (km) Description References
I‑270 Franklin County Columbus 54.97 88.47 I-270 is a large loop around Columbus, Ohio. On its east side and again on its west side, I-270 intersects with I-70. On both its northern and its southern sides, I-270 intersects I-71. I-670 intersects I-270 on its northeastern side. [23][24]
I‑271 Medina, Summit, and Cuyahoga counties Cleveland 46.06 74.13 I-271 begins south of Cleveland and curves counterclockwise around Cleveland. It starts at an intersection with I-71 and travels east until it reaches I-77. It then begins curving north to become concurrent with I-480 for 3.1 miles (5.0 km), which comes in from the southeast. I-271 and I-480 continue almost due north until I-480 splits off again to the west. I-271 then continues north until it terminates at I-90 [24][25]
I‑275 Hamilton and Clermont counties Cincinnati 55.97 90.07 I-275 enters Ohio from the south in the Cincinnati area, and it travels counterclockwise around Cincinnati. Northeast of Cincinnati, it intersects I-71, which crosses it from the northeast. North of Cincinnati, it intersects I-75. It then becomes concurrent with I-74, which joins it from the south, for around 2.7 miles (4.3 km). I-74 then leaves to the northeast, and I-275 continues southwest until it passes out of Cincinnati on Ohio's western border. [24][26][27]
I‑277 Summit County Akron 4.14 6.66 I-277 starts at the US 224 and I-77 intersection south of Akron and heads west. It then interstects I-76 which comes from the north, and the road continues as I-76. [24][28]
I‑280 Lucas and Wood counties Toledo 12.41 19.97 I-280 starts south of Toledo at its southern terminus, an intersection with the I-80 and I-90 combined highway. It heads north, curving slightly to the west, and ends by merging with I-75. [24][29][30]
I‑470 Belmont County Wheeling 6.69 10.77 I-470 enters Ohio at its eastern border with West Virginia near Wheeling and heads west. It then merges with I-70. [24][31]
I‑471 Hamilton County Cincinnati .73 1.17 I-471 enters Ohio south of Cincinnati, and travels northwest until it reaches its terminus at I-71. [24][32][33]
I‑475 Lucas County Toledo 20.37 32.78 I-475 is a semicircle around the western half of Toledo. It branches off of I-75 north of Toledo and heads west. It becomes concurrent with US 23, which comes in from the north, and the two head south together. They cross the I-80 and I-90 combined highway, but they do not have an intersection. I-475 then curves back to the east, and terminates at a merge with I-75 south of Toledo. [34][35]
I‑480 Portage, Summit, Cuyahoga, and Lorain counties Cleveland, Elyria, and Lorain 41.77 67.22 I-480 branches off of I-80 and heads northwest. It then becomes concurrent with I-271 for 3.1 miles (5.0 km) and heads north. I-480 then branches off to the west again, where it intersects I-77. After I-77, I-480 intersects I-71 before finally terminating at another intersection with I-80. [24][36][37]
I‑480N Cuyahoga County Maple Heights, Warrensville Heights 1.99 3.20 I-480N is a designation given by the Ohio Department of Transportation starting in Maple Heights as Exit 26 on I-480. It then heads northeast for westbound access to I-271, heading north to I-90. The route is terminated in Warrensville Heights, after intersections with US-422 and I-271 for both lanes to access. [24][38]
I‑490 Cuyahoga County Cleveland 2.43 3.91 I-490 starts at an intersection with East 55th Street and heads west to intersect I-77. It then continues until it reaches an intersection with I-90 and I-71. I-71 comes in from the south and changes designation to I-90 when it leaves the interchange. I-490 comes in from the east, and the road leaves the interchange designated as I-90. [24][39]
I‑670 Franklin County Columbus 9.37 15.08 I-670 branches off of I-270 west of Columbus and heads west into Columbus. It intersects I-71 before terminating at I-70. [24][40][41]
I‑675 Montogmery, Greene, and Clark counties Dayton 26.53 42.70 I-675 forms a quarter-circle around the southeastern quadrant of Dayton. I-675 branches off of I-75 and heads east. It then curves north, then back to the east, and finally back to the north again. It terminates at its interchange with I-70. [24][42][43]
I‑680 Mahoning County Warren and Youngstown 16.43 26.44 I-680 branches off of I-76 and heads north into Youngstown. It then curves to the northwest, and terminates at an interchange with I-80. [44]

Former and proposed routes[edit]

These are interstate designations no longer in use and interstate designations proposed but never used.

Highway Location Major cities served Length (mi) Length (km) Description References
I-80N.svg I-80N Cuyahoga County Cleveland I-80N was a proposed Interstate Highway in Cleveland. It was supposed to branch off north from I-271, then turn west, intersect with I-71, and finally terminate at an intersection with I-90. [45]
I‑80S Medina, Summit, and Portage counties Akron 51 82 Beginning from its western terminus with I-71 about 8 miles (13 km) south of Medina, I-80S traveled almost due east until it reached SR-534 only about 5 miles (8.0 km) north of its starting point. [46]
I‑290 Cuyahoga County Cleveland I-290 was a proposed Interstate Highway near Cleveland. It was supposed to start at I-271 and head west. It would then terminate at I-77 [47]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Staff. "Ohio’s Timeline". Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 20, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d Staff. "Interstate Routes in Each of the 50 States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  3. ^ Staff. "Frequently Asked Questions". Celebrating the Eisenhower Interstate Highway System. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Staff. "Major Cities Served by Interstate Routes". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  5. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 70" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  6. ^ Google (January 19, 2011). "Overview of I-70" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  7. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 71" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  8. ^ Google (January 19, 2011). "Overview of I-71" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  9. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 74" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  10. ^ Google (January 19, 2011). "Overview of I-74" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  11. ^ Staff. "Interstate 75" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  12. ^ Google (January 19, 2011). "Overview of I-75" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  13. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 76" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  14. ^ Google (January 19, 2011). "Overview of I-76" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  15. ^ Staff. "Driving Directions to Main Library". Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County. Retrieved January 22, 2011. 
  16. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 77" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  17. ^ Google (January 20, 2011). "Overview of I-77" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 20, 2011. 
  18. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 80" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  19. ^ Google (January 23, 2011). "Overview of I-80" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 23, 2011. 
  20. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 90" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  21. ^ Google (January 23, 2011). "Overview of I-90" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 23, 2011. 
  22. ^ Staff (October 31, 2002). "Auxiliary Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System Of Interstate and Defense Highways". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  23. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 270" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Official Ohio Transportation Map (Map). Cartography by ODOT. Ohio Department of Transportation. 2007. 
  25. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 271" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  26. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 275" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  27. ^ Google (January 22, 2011). "Overview of I-275" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 22, 2011. 
  28. ^ Google (January 26, 2011). "Overview of I-277" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  29. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 280" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  30. ^ Google (January 26, 2011). "Overview of I-280" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  31. ^ Google (January 26, 2011). "I-470 in Ohio" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  32. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 471" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  33. ^ Google (January 22, 2011). "Overview of I-471" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 22, 2011. 
  34. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 475" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  35. ^ Google (January 26, 2011). "Overview of I-475" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  36. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 480" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  37. ^ Google (January 27, 2011). "Overview of I-480" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 27, 2011. 
  38. ^ Google (January 26, 2015). "Overview of I-480N" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 26, 2015. 
  39. ^ Google (January 23, 2011). "Overview of I-490" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 23, 2011. 
  40. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 670" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  41. ^ Google (January 27, 2011). "Overview of I-670" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 27, 2011. 
  42. ^ Staff (2007). "Interstate 675" (PDF). Ohio Interstate Exit Guide. Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 
  43. ^ Google (January 27, 2011). "I-675 in Ohio" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 27, 2011. 
  44. ^ Google (January 27, 2011). "Overview of I-680" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 27, 2011. 
  45. ^ Rand McNally Road Atlas (Map). Rand McNally. 1962. Cleveland inset. 
  46. ^ Official Ohio Highway Map and Economic Digest (MRSID) (Map). Ohio Department of Highways. 1969. Cleveland inset. Retrieved February 5, 2011. 
  47. ^ Ohio Official State Map (Map). Ohio Department of Transportation. 1969. Retrieved January 28, 2011. 

External links[edit]