List of Italian-American politicians by state

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To be included in this list, the person must have a Wikipedia article showing they are Italian American politician or must have references showing they are Italian American politician and are notable.

Arizona[edit]

California[edit]

Colorado[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

Delaware[edit]

Florida[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Louisiana[edit]

Maine[edit]

Maryland[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

Mississippi[edit]

Nevada[edit]

New Hampshire[edit]

New Jersey[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

New York[edit]

Ohio[edit]

Oregon[edit]

Pennsylvania[edit]

Rhode Island[edit]

Texas[edit]

Vermont[edit]

Washington[edit]

Wyoming[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]"After listing Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio as one of the top Italian-American crime fighters in the last century, a Washington-based advocacy group has now disavowed him."
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. "The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Rick Renzi (R-Ariz.)"
  3. ^ [2]"One Italian American U.S. presidential contender (Mario Cuomo) and four vice presidential contenders (John Pastore, Peter Rodino, Joseph Alioto, Geraldine Ferraro) have been adversely affected by media images of our culture over the years. Hollywood 'artists' have used their stature to weave mobster and moron images into the very fabric of our heritage."
  4. ^ [3]"Some people thought that Son wasn't very bright, but he was smart enough to take an introverted 16-year-old girl and a scrappy little Italian guy with a bad voice and turn them into the most successful and beloved couple of this generation."
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o [4]“All Italian-American incumbent congressmen were re-elected, except Vic Fazio (D-Calif.) who did not seek another term. Current House members include George Miller (D-Calif.), Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), James Rogan (R-Calif.), Diana DeGette (D-Colo.), Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), John Mica (R-Fla.), David Weldon (R-Fla.), Jerry Costello (D-Ill.), Donald Manzullo (R-Ill.), John Baldacci (D-Maine), Connie Morella (R-Md.), Joe Moakley (D-Mass.), Bruce Vento (D-Minn.), James Oberstar (D-Minn.), Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.), Marge Roukema (R-N.J.), Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), William Pascrell (D-N.J.), Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), Vito Fossella (R-N.Y.), John LaFalce (D-N.Y.), James Traficant, Jr., (D-Ohio), Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), John Murtha (D-Pa.), Frank Mascara (D-Pa.), Mike Doyle (D-Pa.), and Nick Lampson (D-Texas).”
  6. ^ [5] Salute to Italian American Public Officials...Los Angeles County District Attorney Gil Garcetti"
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. "Among them are four women in the House of Representatives, including Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi (D-Ca.), who was elected Minority Leader in 2002, elevating her to the highest post ever held by a woman, and by an Italian American, in the history of the U.S. Congress."
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-20. Retrieved 2006-11-30. "During the same period, the mayors of two of America's largest cities were Italian Americans: Angelo Rossi of San Francisco and Fiorello LaGuardia of New York. Both were sons of Italian immigrants."
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Mike Thompson (D-Ca.)”
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congresswoman Diana L. DeGette (D-Colo.)”
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Thomas G. Tancredo (R-Colo.)”
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.)”
  13. ^ [6]"Lieutenant Governor Michael Fedele's Official Page"
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. "The first Italian American congresswoman was Ella Grasso (D-Conn.) who served from 1970 to 1975."
  15. ^ LaGumina, Salvatore J. (2 September 2003). The Italian American Experience: An Encyclopedia. Routledge. p. 174. 
  16. ^ McCormick, David (1 October 2014). "Freedom's Ride". Italian America. 
  17. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-20. Retrieved 2006-11-30. "ITALIAN AMERICANS IN GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC SERVICE...Two of the original signers of the Declaration of Independence were of Italian origin: William Paca and Caesar Rodney. Paca was one of the first senators in the Maryland state legislature, governor of Maryland (1782 to 1785) and a major general during the Revolutionary War. Rodney of Delaware, descended from the Adelmare family in Treviso, is most remembered for his courageous ride to Philadelphia in July 1776. Though sick with cancer, he rode through thunder and rain to arrive just in time to vote for independence."
  18. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman John Mica (R-Fla.)”
  19. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Dave Weldon (R-Fla.)”
  20. ^ [7]"All Italian-American incumbent congressmen were re-elected, except Vic Fazio (D-Calif.) who did not seek another term. Current House members include George Miller (D-Calif.), Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), James Rogan (R-Calif.), Diana DeGette (D-Colo.), Rosa DeLauro (D-Conn.), John Mica (R-Fla.), David Weldon (R-Fla.), Jerry Costello (D-Ill.), Donald Manzullo (R-Ill.), John Baldacci (D-Maine), Connie Morella (R-Md.), Joe Moakley (D-Mass.), Bruce Vento (D-Minn.), James Oberstar (D-Minn.), Frank LoBiondo (R-N.J.), Marge Roukema (R-N.J.), Frank Pallone (D-N.J.), William Pascrell (D-N.J.), Rick Lazio (R-N.Y.), Vito Fossella (R-N.Y.), John LaFalce (D-N.Y.), James Traficant, Jr., (D-Ohio), Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.), John Murtha (D-Pa.), Frank Mascara (D-Pa.), Mike Doyle (D-Pa.), and Nick Lampson (D-Texas)."
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Donald A. Manzullo (R-Il.)”
  22. ^ [8]"Italian Americans have also made their mark on the city through public service -- it was Italian mayor Victor H. Schiro who led the city through school integration in 1969."
  23. ^ [9]"In its coverage of Pelosi on November 14, the Sun also made a big deal about her late father, Thomas "The Elder" D'Alesandro. He was an ex-congressman and the mayor of Baltimore for three terms (1947-1959). However, what the Sun omitted was the central fact that when he was the mayor, it hardly ever had a good word to say about him! During his reign, the Sun's leadership was mostly WASP-dominated. It had never really gotten over the fact, that D'Alesandro was the first Italian-American, the first Roman Catholic, and the first politician from a working class enclave, "Little Italy", to be elected to that office."
  24. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-20. Retrieved 2006-11-30. "Among the first Italian American governors were William Paca, who served Maryland from 1782 to 1785; Caesar Rodney of Delaware in 1776; and Andrew Houston Longino who was elected governor of Mississippi in 1900. The first Republican governor of Italian descent was Christopher Del Sesto, who was elected governor of Rhode Island in 1958."
  25. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Michael Capuano (D-Ma.)”
  26. ^ a b [10]”Additionally, the only two Italian-American governors were re-elected - Paul Cellucci (R-Mass.) and George Pataki (R-N.Y.).”
  27. ^ [11]"Foster Furcolo was born in New Haven. Raised in Connecticut and educated at Yale, Furcolo moved to Springfield after World War II. In 1948, he won a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. He served one term in Congress before being elected the first Italian-American governor of Massachusetts. Other Italian-Americans followed him into state government, including two more governors, John Volpe and Paul Cellucci. At a political gathering in 2005, with the newly elected Senate President Robert Travaglini and Speaker of the House Salvatore DiMasi in attendance, a legislator was heard to remark, "The Italians are taking over.… It's never been better.… But I'm not talking about politics, I'm talking about the food."
  28. ^ Malone starts bid for governor “Malone, 42, the Harvard-educated son of Italian immigrants, made his announcement...”
  29. ^ [12]"Thomas Menino is the third-term mayor of Boston and president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. The city's first Italian-American mayor, Menino was first elected in November 1993, taking more than 60 percent of the vote. He was uncontested in the 1997 election, and won a third term in a landslide victory in November 2001."
  30. ^ Wolfson, C.K. (September 8, 2010). "Katama resident Richard Tisei: a quiet political presence — until now". The Martha's Vineyard Times. Retrieved October 17, 2012. 
  31. ^ [13]"He was Massachusetts' second Italian-American governor and the first Bay State governor to be elected to a four-year term."
  32. ^ [14]"Mr. Ficano is known as a public servant committed to serving the people. From an early age, he learned to fill each day with integrity, purpose and honor. He was taught these lessons in his close-knit family of Italian immigrants. His parents and grandparents worked hard and gave back to their diverse community. His family instilled in him the importance of embracing and respecting those of diverse cultures, faiths and background."
  33. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman James L. Oberstar (D-Minn.)”
  34. ^ [15]"Italian American Governors...Andrew Houston Longino"
  35. ^ [16]"Ms. Augustine was awarded a Lyndon B. Johnson Internship Grant in 1975 and worked in Washington, D.C. as a Congressional Intern for the 38th District of California. She was a recipient of the American Legion Achievement Medallion, the Community Partners Family Resource Center 1998 Community Service Award of Excellence, the 1998 National Republican Legislators Association, Legislator of the Year, Nevada Opera Theatre's International Friendship Award (2003), and the Augustus Society's Italian American of the Year (2003)."
  36. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Senator John Ensign (R-Nev.)”
  37. ^ [17]"That Jersey guy was born in Newark, oldest son of an Irish dad and an Italian mom."
  38. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Michael A. Ferguson (R-N.J.)”
  39. ^ [18]"Italian American Governors...James Joseph Florio"
  40. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-N.J.)”
  41. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-N.J.)”
  42. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman William J. Pascrell, Jr. (D-N.J.)”
  43. ^ a b [19]"One Italian American U.S. presidential contender (Mario Cuomo) and four vice presidential contenders (John Pastore, Peter Rodino, Joseph Alioto, Geraldine Ferraro) have been adversely affected by media images of our culture over the years. Hollywood 'artists' have used their stature to weave mobster and moron images into the very fabric of our heritage. "
  44. ^ a b [20]”The caucus lost a seat in the Senate, with only two of the six sitting Italian-American senators up for re-election this term. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) held onto his seat, while Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R-N.Y.) lost to Charles Schumer. The four senators that were not up for re-election were Peter Dominici (R-N.M.), Michael Enzi (R-Wyo.), Rick Santorum (R-Pa.), and Robert Torricelli (D-N.J.).”
  45. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Senator Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.)”
  46. ^ [21]"I was raised in a very, very ethnic household. Very Italian, very Catholic. I have only attended Catholic Schools from Kindergarten through college."
  47. ^ [22]"Carmine DeSapio holds the dubious distinction of being the first Italian-American boss of Tammany Hall, the New York City political machine."
  48. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-20. Retrieved 2006-11-30. "By virtue of her nomination by a major political party for the Vice Presidency of the United States, Geraldine Ferraro is one of the few Italian American women who is mentioned by name in traditional American History textbooks. She was born Geraldine Anne Ferraro (1935-) in Newburgh, New York, the only daughter of Italian immigrant Dominick Ferraro and Antoinette Corrieri Ferraro."
  49. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Vito Fossella (R-N.Y.)”
  50. ^ [23]"In fairness to the mayor, let's start with his good qualities. A few years ago, the annual San Gennaro festival in Little Italy was exposed as corrupt and mob-dominated. Even the dollar bills tourists attached to statues of the Virgin Mother were going into the Mafia's pockets. It turned out that as a private citizen, prosecutor and mayor, Giuliani hadn't attended San Gennaro in twenty years. For an Italian American politician or wannabe in New York City, it seemed like the festival would be a natural. One had the sense of some strong sense of impropriety, some metal in Giuliani's character which led him to avoid it in the absence of any immediate reward for doing so. There were no headlines, "Giuliani Declines to Attend San Gennaro Again This Year."
  51. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-20. Retrieved 2006-11-30. "The 1950 New York City mayoral race was among three Italian Americans: Edward Corsi, Vincent Impellitteri, and Ferdinand Pecora. Impellitteri won on the Experience Party ticket and served as mayor until January, 1954."
  52. ^ [24]"the half-Italian, half-Jewish gadfly who had argued against nativist hysteria for a larger, broader vision of immigrant America, had just been elected mayor of New York City."
  53. ^ [25]"Mr. Lopez, who has two adult children, is primarily of Italian descent; his surname comes from a Spanish grandfather. When he moved to Bushwick, Mr. Lopez spoke no Spanish, and even today his fluency in the language is limited."
  54. ^ [26]"Born and raised on Staten Island, Susan Molinari is a third generation public servant. Her grandfather was the first Italian-American immigrant elected to the New York State Assembly and she was elected to Congress succeeding her father, Guy V. Molinari, who is now serving as the Borough President of Staten Island."
  55. ^ [27]"Molinari Speaks at CSJ Event to Promote Positive Image of Italian-American Women The national Commission for Social Justice (CSJ) sponsored a breakfast on Staten Island, N.Y., may 18, to promote positive and accurate images of Italian - American women and featured U.S. Rep. Susan Molinari (R-N.Y.) as guest speaker. The breakfast was organized by the CSJ's Committee to promote a positive Image of Italian- American Women, which was formed in 1995 to fight the emerging problem of media images that defame women of Italian heritage."
  56. ^ [28]"Italian American Governors...Charles Poletti"
  57. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-05-20. Retrieved 2006-11-30. "Alfred E. Smith, who was born Alfred Emanuele Ferrara, was the first Italian American governor of New York (1919), and the first Italian American presidential candidate. He was defeated by Herbert Hoover in 1928. His paternal grandfather was born in Genoa in 1808."
  58. ^ [29]"She is the first Irish-American Speaker, Vallone being Italian-American and Gifford Miller a WASP."
  59. ^ [30]"Anthony Celebrezze, the first Italian-born to become Cabinet Member as Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare."
  60. ^ [31]"Italian American Governors...Richard F. Celeste"
  61. ^ [32]"Italian American Governors...Michael V. DiSalle"
  62. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Tim Ryan (D-Ohio)”
  63. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Patrick J. Tiberi (R-Ohio)”
  64. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Peter A. DeFazio (D-Ore.)”
  65. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. "The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Robert A. Brady (D-Pa.)"
  66. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congressman Mike Doyle (D-Pa.)”
  67. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Congresswoman Melissa A. Hart (R-Pa.)”
  68. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Senator Rick Santorum (R-Pa.)”
  69. ^ [33]"Italian American Governors...Christopher Del Sesto"
  70. ^ [34]"Italian American Governors...Edward D. DiPrete"
  71. ^ [35]"Italian American Governors...Philip William Noel"
  72. ^ [36]"Italian American Governors...John A. Notte"
  73. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. "In the Senate, John Orlando Pastore (D-R.I.) was the first Italian American senator (1950-1976)."
  74. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-05-14. Retrieved 2016-02-09. ”The Italian American Congressional Delegation...Senator Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.)”
  75. ^ [37]"Italian American Governors...Albert Dean Rosellini"