List of Japanese Navy ships and war vessels in World War II

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This List of Japanese Navy ships and war vessels in World War II is a list of seafaring vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy of World War II. It includes submarines, battleships, oilers, minelayers and other types of Japanese sea vessels of war and naval ships used during wartime. (This list is not yet complete.)

Aircraft Carrier[edit]

Fleet Carriers (11)
Class Picture Type Ships (Years in Service) Displacement Note
Akagi-class Akagi After Remodelled Aircraft carrier Akagi (1927–1942) 36,500 tonnes Converted from an Amagi-class battlecruiser. Sunk at Midway on June 5, 1942
Kaga-class Kaga after Modernization Aircraft carrier Kaga (1928–1942) 38,200 tonnes Converted from a Tosa-class battleship. Sunk at Midway on June 4, 1942
Sōryū-class IJN Sōryū Aircraft carrier Sōryū (1937–1942)
Hiryū (1939–1942)
16,200 tonnes Hiryū is often considered to be a separated class. Sunk at Midway on June 5, 1942

Soryu took part in the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Battle of Wake Island, and supported the conquest of the Dutch East Indies. She was sunk on June 4, 1942

Shōkaku-class Shōkaku Aircraft carrier Shōkaku (1941–1944)
Zuikaku (1941–1944)
25,675 tonnes With the exception of the Battle of Midway, Shōkaku and Zuikaku participated in every major naval action of the Pacific War, including the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Indian Ocean Raid, the Battle of the Coral Sea, and the Guadalcanal Campaign.
Unryū-class Unryū on 16 July 1944 Aircraft carrier Unryū (1944–1945)
Amagi (1944–1945)
Katsuragi (1944–1945)
17,480 tonnes The design for these ships was based on the aircraft carrier Hiryū. IJN Planned to build 16 ships, however only 3 completed, 2 almost completed but project later abandoned then scrapped after the war. One also almost completed but sunk as a target practice then salvaged later scrapped. The rest cancelled in favor for construction of Shinano.
Taihō-class Aircraft Carrier Taihō Aircraft carrier Taihō (1944–1944) 30,250 tonnes A bit of a break from traditional Japanese carrier design, Taiho was a heavily armored carrier expected to withstand multiple bomb and torpedo strikes. However, design faults allowed it to be sunk with one torpedo from the USS Albacore on June 19, 1944
Shinano-class Aircraft Carrier Taihō Aircraft carrier Shinano (1944–1944) 65,800 tonnes Initially laid down as the third of the Yamato-class battleships, Shinano was converted into an aircraft carrier due to the Japanese defeat at Midway. She was sunk on November 29, 1944
Light Aircraft Carrier (9)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Hōshō-class Hōshō on 1922 Light aircraft carrier Hōshō (1922–1945) 7,470 tonnes First purpose-built carrier in the world.
Ryūjō-class Ryūjō on 1934 Light aircraft carrier Ryūjō (1931–1942) 8,000 tonnes
Hiyō-class Jun'yō on 1945 Light aircraft carrier Hiyō (1942–1944)
Jun'yō (1942–1946)
24,150 tonnes Converted from an ocean liner in 1939.
Zuihō-class Zuihō on 1940 Light aircraft carrier Zuihō (1940–1944)
Shōhō (1939–1942)
11,443 tonnes
Chitose-class Chitose Light aircraft carrier Chitose (1938–1944)
Chiyoda (1938–1944)
11,200 tonnes Both ships were seaplane tenders before their conversion in 1943.
Ryūhō-class Ryūhō on 1942 Light aircraft carrier Ryūhō (1934/1942–1945) 16,700 tonnes Converted from the submarine tender Taigei 1941–1942. Recommissioned as Ryūhō 1942.
Escort Carrier (10)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Taiyō-class Taiyo Escort carrier Taiyō (1941–44)
Chūyō (1942–43)
Unyō (1942–44)
17,830 tonnes
Kaiyō-class Kaiyo Escort carrier Kaiyō (1943–1945) 13,600 tonnes. Converted from ocean liner Argentina Maru.
Shin'yō-class Aircraft carrier Shinyo.JPG Escort carrier Shin'yō (1943–1944) 17,500 tonnes
Akitsu Maru-class AkitsuMaru.jpg Escort carrier Akitsu Maru (1942–1944)
Nigitsu Maru (1942?–1944)
11,800 tonnes Operated by the Imperial Japanese Army. Worlds' first Amphibious Assault ships.
Shimane Maru-class ShimaneMaru-1945.jpg Escort carrier Shimane Maru (1945–1945) 11,989 tonnes
Yamashio Maru-class YamashioMaru-1945.jpg Escort carrier Yamashio Maru (1945–1945) 16,119 tonnes
Kumano Maru-class KumanoMaru-1945.jpg Escort carrier Kumano Maru (1945–1945) 8,258 tonnes Operated by Imperial Japanese Army.

Battleship[edit]

Fast Battleship (4)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Kongō-class Haruna in 1934, following her second reconstruction Fast battleship Kongō
Hiei
Kirishima
Haruna
32,156 tonnes Laid down and commissioned as Battlecruisers in early 20th century, remodeled into Battleships because of Washington Naval Treaty in the late 20' and into Fast Battleships in 1935, allowing them to accompany growing carrier force.
Battleship (8)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Fusō-class Fusō undergoing post-reconstruction trials. Battleship Fusō
Yamashiro
29,330 tonnes There was a plan to converted these ships into Aviation Battleships in 1943. The plan was cancelled and the two Ise-class battleships were converted instead.
Ise-class Hyūga during sea trials in 1943 Battleship Ise
Hyūga
27,384 tonnes Converted into Aviation Battleship in 1943.
Nagato-class Nagato lies at anchor in Brunei Bay, 21 October 1944, shortly before the Battle of Leyte Gulf Battleship Nagato
Mutsu
32,720 tonnes
Yamato-class Yamato on Trials Battleship Yamato
Musashi
69,988 tonnes 5 planned, 1 converted into Aircraft carrier, 2 cancelled. Yamato was sunk during the battle of Okinawa. She never saw action there and was sunk by aircraft on the way.

Cruiser[edit]

Heavy Cruiser (18)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Furutaka-class Japanese cruiser Furutaka.jpg Heavy cruiser Furutaka
Kako
7,100 tonnes
Aoba-class Nh97727.jpg Heavy cruiser Aoba
Kinugasa
7,100 tonnes
Myōkō-class Myōkō trials 1941.jpg Heavy cruiser Myōkō
Nachi
Haguro
Ashigara
11,633 tonnes
Takao-class IJN Heavy Cruiser Takao.jpg Heavy cruiser Takao
Atago
Maya
Chōkai
11,633 tonnes
Mogami-class Mogami running trials in 1935.jpg Heavy cruiser Mogami
Mikuma
Suzuya
Kumano
8,500 tonnes Suzuya and Kumano is Considered as Suzuya Sub-class.
Mogami considered as an Aviation Cruiser by IJN (1943).
Tone-class Japanese cruiser Tone.jpg Heavy cruiser Tone
Chikuma
11,213 tonnes Considered as Aviation Cruisers by IJN
Light Cruiser (24)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Tenryū-class IJN Tenru in Yokosuka 1925.jpg Light cruiser Tenryū
Tatsuta
3,948 tonnes
Kuma-class IJN Kuma in 1930 off Tsingtao.jpg Light cruiser Kuma
Tama
Kitakami
Ōi
Kiso
5,500 tonnes Kitakami, Ōi and Kiso later Converted to Torpedo cruiser under a short-lived Imperial Japanese Navy program.
Nagara-class Nagara.jpg Light cruiser Nagara
Isuzu
Yura
Natori
Kinu
Abukuma
5,570 tonnes
Yūbari-class Yubari n09957.jpg Light cruiser Yūbari 2,890 t tonnes She was an experimental light cruiser.
Sendai-class Sendai-1.jpg Light cruiser Sendai
Jintsu
Naka
5,195 tonnes Planned 8. Cancelled 5.
Katori-class Katori-2.jpg Light cruiser Katori
Kashima
Kashii
5,890 tonnes Planned 4. Cancelled 1.

Originally served as Training Ship.

Agano-class Japanese cruiser Agano.jpg Light cruiser Agano
Noshiro
Yahagi
Sakawa
6,652 tonnes
Ōyodo-class OyodoJun43.jpg Light cruiser Ōyodo 8,164 tonnes Planned 2. Cancelled 1.
Yasoshima-class Chinese cruiser PING-HAI in 1936.jpg Light cruiser Yasoshima 2,448 tonnes Serve for Republic of China Navy under the name Ping Hai until seized and re-float on 1938 by IJN after sunken a year before.

Destroyer[edit]

Destroyer (169)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Momi-class Japanese destroyer Ashi.jpg Destroyer Momi
Kaya
Nashi
Take
Kaki
Tsuga
Nire
Kuri
Kiku
Aoi
Hagi
Fuji
Susuki
Hishi
Hasu
Warabi
Tade
Sumire
Tsuta'
Ashi'
Yomogi'
850 tonnes 28 vessel planned 21 completed. 7 re-ordered as the new Wakatake-class. Relegated to mostly secondary roles.
Minekaze-class Japanese destroyer Minekaze Yokosuka Showa 7.jpg Destroyer Minekaze
Sawakaze
Okikaze
Shimakaze
Nadakaze
Yakaze
Hakaze
Shiokaze
Akikaze
Yūkaze
Tachikaze
Hokaze
Nokaze
Namikaze
Numakaze
1,345 tonnes
Wakatake-class IJN No46 patrol boat in 1940.jpg Destroyer Wakatake
Kuretake
Sanae'
Sawarabi
Asagao
Yūgao
Fuyō
Karukaya
900 tonnes 23 vessel planned 8 completed. Relegated to mostly secondary roles.
Kamikaze-class Kamikaze II.jpg Destroyer Kamikaze
Asakaze
Harukaze
Matsukaze
Hatakaze
Oite
Hayate
Asanagi
Yūnagi
1,400 tonnes
Mutsuki-class Japanese destroyer Mutsuki 1930.jpg Destroyer Mutsuki
Kisaragi
Yayoi
Uzuki
Satsuki
Minazuki
Fumizuki
Nagatsuki
Kikuzuki
Mikazuki
Mochizuki
Yūzuki
1,315 tonnes
Fubuki-class Fubuki.jpg Destroyer Fubuki
Shirayuki
Hatsuyuki
Miyuki
Murakumo
Shinonome
Usugumo
Shirakumo
Isonami
Uranami
1,750 tonnes
Ayanami-class Ayanami II.jpg Destroyer Ayanami
Shikinami
Asagiri
Yūgiri
Amagiri
Sagiri
Oboro
Akebono
Sazanami
Ushio
1,750 tonnes Also known as Type II Fubuki-class.
Akatsuki-class Akatsuki II.jpg Destroyer Akatsuki
Hibiki
Ikazuchi
Inazuma
1,750 tonnes Also known as Type III Fubuki-class.
Hatsuharu-class Japanese destroyer Hatsuharu 1934.jpg Destroyer Hatsuharu
Nenohi
Wakaba
Hatsushimo
Ariake
Yūgure
1,530 tonnes
Shiratsuyu-class Yamakaze-1.jpg Destroyer Shiratsuyu
Shigure
Murasame
Yūdachi
Harusame
Samidare
Umikaze
Yamakaze
Kawakaze
Suzukaze
1,685 tonnes
Asashio-class Asashio II.jpg Destroyer Asashio
Ōshio
Michishio
Arashio
Natsugumo
Yamagumo
Minegumo
Asagumo
Arare
Kasumi
1,685 tonnes
Kagerō-class Yukikaze 2.jpg Destroyer Kagerō
Shiranui
Kuroshio
Oyashio
Hayashio
Natsushio
Hatsukaze
Yukikaze
Amatsukaze
Tokitsukaze
Urakaze
Isokaze
Hamakaze
Tanikaze
Nowaki
Arashi
Hagikaze
Maikaze
Akigumo
2,000 tonnes Called Destroyer Type-A by IJN.
Yūgumo-class Naganami Destroyer Yūgumo
Makigumo
Kazagumo
Naganami
Makinami
Takanami
Ōnami
Kiyonami
Tamanami
Suzunami
Fujinami
Hayanami
Hamanami
Okinami
Kishinami
Asashimo
Hayashimo
Akishimo
Kiyoshimo
2,077 tonnes Called Destroyer Type-A by IJN.
Akizuki-class Akizuki.jpg Destroyer Akizuki
Teruzuki
Suzutsuki
Hatsuzuki
Niizuki
Wakatsuki
Shimotsuki
2,700 tonnes
Fuyutsuki-class Fuyuzuki.jpg Destroyer Fuyutsuki
Harutsuki
Yoizuki
Natsuzuki
2,700 tonnes Akizuki-subclass.
Michitsuki-class Hanazuki.jpg Destroyer Hanazuki 2,700 tonnes 16 vessel planned however only 1 completed.
Akizuki-subclass.
Shimakaze-class Shimakaze.jpg Destroyer Shimakaze 2,570 tonnes
Matsu-class Momi II.jpg Destroyer Matsu
Take
Ume
Momo
Kuwa
Kiri
Sugi
Maki
Momi
Kashi
Kara
Nara
Sakura
Yanagi
Tsubaki
Hinoki
Kaede
Keyaki
1,260 tonnes
Tachibana-class Momi II.jpg Destroyer Tachibana
Kaki
Kaba
Tsuta
Hagi
Sumire
Kusunoki
Katsuzakura
Nire
Nashi
Shii
Enoki
Odake
Hatsuume
1,350 tonnes Matsu-subclass.

Torpedo Boat[edit]

Torpedo Boat (12)
Class Picture Type Boats Displacement Note
Chidori-class IJN torpedo boat CHIDORI in 1934.jpg Torpedo boat Chidori
Manazuru
Tomozuru
Hatsukari
600 tonnes 20 vessel planned however only 4 completed. 16 replaced by Ōtori-class.
Ōtori-class Kiji 1937.jpg Torpedo boat Ōtori
Hiyodori
Hayabusa
Kasasagi
Kiji
Kari
Sagi
Hato
Hatsutaka
Aotaka
Wakataka
Kumataka
Yamadori
Mizutori
Umidori
Komadori
960 tonnes 16 vessel planned however only 8 completed.

Submarine[edit]

Submarine (213)
Class Picture Type Boats Displacement Note
I-1-class Japanese submarine I-1.jpg Submarine I-1
I-2
I-3
I-4
I-5
I-6
I-7
I-8
1,970 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Junsen type submarine
I-9-class Japanese submarine I-10 in 1942.jpg Submarine I-9
I-10
I-11
I-12
I-13
I-14
2,434 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Type A (Ko) submarine.
I-15-class I-15.jpg Submarine I-15
I-17
I-19
I-21
I-23
I-25
I-26
I-27
I-29
I-30
I-31
I-32
I-33
I-34
I-35
I-36
I-37
I-38
I-39
I-40
I-41
I-42
I-43
I-44
I-45
I-54
I-58
2,184 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Type B (Otsu) submarine.
I-16-class Japanese submarine I-18 in 1941.jpg Submarine I-16
I-18
I-20
I-22
I-24
I-46
I-47
I-48
I-52
I-53
I-55
2,184 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Type C (Hei) Submarine.
I-361-class Japanese submarine I-361.jpg Submarine I-361
I-362
I-363
I-364
I-365
I-366
I-367
I-368
I-369
I-370
I-371
I-372
I-373
1,440 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Type D (Tei) submarine
I-51-class Japanese submarine I51 1924.jpg Submarine I-51
I-152
I-153
I-154
I-155
I-156
I-157
I-158
I-159
I-60
I-63
I-61
I-162
I-164
I-165
I-66
I-67
I-168
I-169
I-70
I-171
I-73
I-174
I-175
I-176
I-177
I-178
I-179
I-180
I-181
I-182
I-183
I-184
I-185
1,575 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Kaidai type submarine
I-121-class Japanese submarine I-21.jpg Submarine I-121
I-122
I-123
I-124
1,142 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Kiraisen type submarine
I-351-class Bridge of IJN submarine I-351 in 1945.jpg Submarine I-351 3,512 tonnes Planned 6. Completed 1.
The official designation of the submarine was Senho type submarine
I-201-class SenTaka.jpg Submarine I-201
I-202
I-203
6,560 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Sentaka type submarine
I-501-class Submarine I-501 1,616 tonnes Was German Kriegsmarine submarine under the name U-181, until given to Japan May 1945.
I-502-class Submarine I-502 1,610 tonnes Was German Kriegsmarine submarine under the name U-862, until given to Japan May 1945.
I-503-class Germany submarine UIT24 in 1944.jpg Submarine I-503 1,610 tonnes Was Regia Marina submarine under the name Cappelini then captured by IJN after Italy's capitulation then given to Kriegsmarine on September 1943 under the name UIT-24. After that captured again by IJN on May 1945 after Nazi-Germany's surrender.
I-504-class Submarine I-504 1,763 tonnes Was Regia Marina submarine under the name Luigi Torelli then it was temporarily interned to IJN after Italy's capitulation then given to Kriegsmarine on September 1943 under the name UIT-25. After that captured again by IJN on May 1945 after Nazi-Germany's surrender.
I-505-class Submarine I-505 1,763 tonnes Was German Kriegsmarine submarine under the name U-219, until given to Japan May 1945.
I-506-class Submarine I-506 1,610 tonnes Was German Kriegsmarine submarine under the name U-195, until given to Japan May 1945.
Ro-11-class Japanese submarine Ro-11 1919.jpg Submarine Ro-11
Ro-12
Ro-13
Ro-14
Ro-15
Ro-16
Ro-17
Ro-18
Ro-19
Ro-20
Ro-21
Ro-22
Ro-23
Ro-24
Ro-25
Ro-26
Ro-27
Ro-28
Ro-29
Ro-30
Ro-31
Ro-32
Ro-33
Ro-34
Ro-35
Ro-36
Ro-37
Ro-37
Ro-38
Ro-39
Ro-40
Ro-41
Ro-42
Ro-43
Ro-44
Ro-45
Ro-46
Ro-47
Ro-48
Ro-49
Ro-50
Ro-55
Ro-56
720 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Type Kaichū submarine.
Ro-51-class Japanese submarine Ro-51 in the 1920s.jpg Submarine Ro-51
Ro-52
Ro-53
Ro-54
Ro-55
Ro-56
Ro-57
Ro-58
Ro-59
Ro-60
Ro-61
Ro-62
Ro-63
Ro-64
Ro-65
Ro-66
Ro-67
Ro-68
893 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Type L submarine
Ro-100-class Japanese submarine Ro-101 in 1943.jpg Submarine Ro-100
Ro-101
Ro-102
Ro-103
Ro-104
Ro-105
Ro-106
Ro-107
Ro-108
Ro-109
Ro-110
Ro-111
Ro-112
Ro-113
Ro-114
Ro-115
Ro-116
Ro-117
525 tonnes
Ha-201-class Ha-202 Submarine Ha-201
Ha-202
Ha-203
Ha-204
Ha-205
Ha-207
Ha-208
Ha-209
Ha-210
Ha-216
320 tonnes Never saw combat
The official designation of the submarine was Sentaka-Shō type submarine.
Ro-500-class Japanese submarine RO-500 in 1943.jpg Submarine Ro-500 1,120 tonnes Was German Kriegsmarine submarine under the name U-511, until given to Japan 16 September 1943.
Ro-501-class Submarine Ro-501 1,144 tonnes Was German Kriegsmarine submarine under the name U-1224, until given to Japan 15 February 1944.
Submarine aircraft carrier (3)
Class Picture Type Boats Displacement Note
I-400-class I400 2.jpg Submarine aircraft carrier I-400
I-401
I-402
6,560 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Sentoku type Submarine.
Transport Submarine (49)
Class Picture Type Boats Displacement Note
Ha-101-class (left to right) Ibuki, Ha-105, Ha-106 and Ha-109 Transport submarine Ha-101
Ha-102
Ha-103
Ha-104
Ha-105
Ha-106
Ha-107
Ha-108
Ha-109
Ha-111
370 tonnes The official designation of the submarine was Sen'yu type submarine
Yu-class IJA Yu1-1944.jpg Tranport submarine Yu-1
Yu-2
Yu-3
Yu-4
Yu-5
Yu-6
Yu-7
Yu-8
Yu-9
Yu-10
Yu-11
Yu-12
Yu-13
Yu-14
Yu-15
Yu-16
Yu-17
Yu-18
Yu-19
Yu-20
Yu-21
Yu-22
Yu-23
Yu-24
Yu-1001
Yu-1002
Yu-1003
Yu-1004
Yu-1005
Yu-1006
Yu-1007
Yu-1008
Yu-1009
Yu-1010
Yu-2001
Yu-2002
Yu-3001
Yu-3002
Yu-3003
274 tonnes Used by Imperial Japanese Army.

Submarine Tender[edit]

Submarine Tender (3)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Jingei-class Jingei (above) and Chōgei in 1924 Submarine tender Jingei
Chōgei
6,240 tonnes
Taigei-class Jingei (above) and Chōgei in 1924 Submarine tender Taigei 16,700 tonnes Converted into Light aircraft carrier.

Repair Ship[edit]

Repair Ship (2)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Asahi-class Japanese battleship Asahi.jpg Repair ship Asahi 15,200 tonnes Converted from Pre-dreadnought battleship.
Akashi-class IJN repair ship AKASHI in 1939.jpg Repair ship Akashi 9,000 tonnes

Food Supply Ship[edit]

Food Supply Ship (8)
Class Picture Type Ships Displacement Note
Mamiya-class IJN supply ship MAMIYA around 1930.jpg Food supply ship Mamiya 15,820 tonnes
Nosaki-class IJN supply ship NOZAKI in 1941.jpg Food supply ship Nosaki 650 tonnes
Kinesaki-class Japanese supply ship Arasaki 1943.jpg Food supply ship Kinesaki
Hayasaki
Shirasaki
Arasaki
910 tonnes
Irako-class Japanese supply ship Irako 1944.jpg Food supply ship Irako 9,570 tonnes
Kurasaki-class Food supply ship Kurasaki
Muroto-class Food supply ship Muroto 8,125 tonnes
Kitakami-Maru-class Food supply ship Kitakami-Maru 498 tonnes

See also[edit]