List of Japanese desserts and sweets

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In Japan, desserts were being made for centuries well before sugar was made widely available. Many desserts commonly available in Japan can be traced back for hundreds of years.[1] In Japanese cuisine, traditional sweets are known as wagashi, and are made using ingredients such as red bean paste and mochi. Though many desserts and sweets date back to the Edo period (1603–1867) and Meiji period (1868–1911), many modern-day sweets and desserts originating from Japan also exist.

Japanese desserts[edit]

Imagawayaki (gozasōrō) being prepared in a store in Sannomiya, Kobe, Japan

Wagashi[edit]

Peanut amanattō. Amanattō is a traditional Japanese confectionery that is made of azuki or other beans, covered with refined sugar after simmering with sugar syrup and drying.

Wagashi (和菓子) is a traditional Japanese confectionery which is often served with tea, especially the types made of mochi, anko (azuki bean paste), and fruits. Wagashi is typically made from plant ingredients.[4] Wagashi are made in a wide variety of shapes and consistencies and with diverse ingredients and preparation methods. Wagashi are popular across the country japan but are only available regionally or seasonally.[5]

Types of wagashi[edit]

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Gallery[edit]

Brands[edit]

See also[edit]

Japanese sweets and desserts[edit]

Related topics[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 38 Japanese Desserts. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/japanese-desserts
  2. ^ Watanabe, Teresa (2012-11-07). "Frances Hashimoto dies at 69; Little Tokyo leader, mochi ice cream creator". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-12-02.
  3. ^ Japanese inn & travel: illustrated. Eibun Nihon etoki jiten. Japan Travel Bureau. 1990. p. 137. Retrieved August 19, 2017.
  4. ^ Gordenker, Alice, "So What the Heck is That?: Wagashi", Japan Times, 20 January 2011, p. 11.
  5. ^ (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2312.html
  6. ^ "ういろう" [Uirō]. Dijitaru daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. OCLC 56431036. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-06-24.

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