List of King Crimson members

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Two lineups of King Crimson performing in 2003 (top) and 2016 (bottom).

King Crimson are an English progressive rock band from London. Formed in January 1969, the group originally included bassist and vocalist Greg Lake, guitarist and keyboardist Robert Fripp, keyboardist and woodwind musician Ian McDonald, lyricist Peter Sinfield, and drummer Michael Giles. After a number of personnel changes, the group disbanded in 1974 but have since reformed on a number of occasions. As of the latest lineup change in 2017, King Crimson consists of Fripp (the sole constant member of the band), saxophonist and flautist Mel Collins (who first joined in 1970), bassist Tony Levin (who first joined in 1981), drummers Pat Mastelotto (who first joined in 1994) and Gavin Harrison (since 2007), guitarist and vocalist Jakko Jakszyk (since 2013), keyboardist Bill Rieflin (who first joined in 2013), and drummer and keyboardist Jeremy Stacey (since 2016).

History[edit]

1969–1984[edit]

Greg Lake was the frontman on the first two King Crimson albums.
Greg Lake was the frontman on the first two King Crimson albums.

After some initial rehearsals starting in late November 1968, King Crimson were officially formed on 13 January 1969 with a lineup of Greg Lake on bass and vocals, Robert Fripp on guitar, Ian McDonald on woodwind and keyboards, Peter Sinfield as a lyricist and occasional synthesizer player, and Michael Giles on drums.[1] After the recording of the band's debut album In the Court of the Crimson King, McDonald and Giles left King Crimson, playing their last show on 16 December.[2] Lake remained for the follow-up, In the Wake of Poseidon, before leaving to form Emerson, Lake & Palmer in April 1970.[3] Fripp and Sinfield rebuilt the group after the album's release, finalising the new lineup by August with the addition of Gordon Haskell, Mel Collins and Andy McCulloch in place of Lake, McDonald and Giles, respectively.[1] After recording Lizard, both Haskell and McCulloch departed.[4]

Ian Wallace replaced McCulloch in December 1970,[1] and Raymond "Boz" Burrell took over from Haskell the following February. The group released Islands and returned to regular touring over the next year, Burrell, Collins and Wallace all left to join Alexis Korner's new group Snape in April 1972.[5] Sinfield had left the group a few months earlier. After the release of the Earthbound live album, Fripp rebuilt King Crimson again in July 1972 with the additions of former Family bassist and vocalist John Wetton, violinist and keyboardist David Cross, former Yes drummer Bill Bruford, and percussionist Jamie Muir.[1][6] After the first of two live shows scheduled upon completion of the group's new album Larks' Tongues in Aspic, Muir abruptly left King Crimson to pursue Buddhism.[7] The remaining four-piece issued Starless and Bible Black in March 1974.[8]

By the time the group began recording the follow-up Red in July 1974, King Crimson were a trio following Cross's departure at the end of the previous tour.[9] Later, on 25 September, Fripp announced that King Crimson had officially disbanded,[1] claiming that the group were "completely over for ever and ever".[10] After several years of side projects, Fripp formed a group called Discipline in April 1981 with former King Crimson drummer Bruford, as well as vocalist and guitarist Adrian Belew, and bassist and Chapman stick player Tony Levin. By the time the band's debut album Discipline was released in October, they had adopted the King Crimson moniker.[11] This lineup remained stable for three years, releasing follow-up albums Beat and Three of a Perfect Pair, before disbanding again upon the conclusion of a promotional touring cycle in July 1984.[12]

1994 onwards[edit]

After a ten-year break, King Crimson reformed again in 1994, with Fripp, Belew, Levin and Bruford joined by second bassist/Chapman stick player Trey Gunn and second drummer Pat Mastelotto.[1] This lineup, dubbed the "Double Trio", began rehearsing in April 1994 and released its only studio effort Thrak the following year.[13] After touring extensively, the group returned to the studio in May 1997 for the recording of their twelfth studio album, but faced difficulties making progress with the sessions.[14] Instead of disbanding again, Fripp decided to initiate a process of "fraKctalisation", splitting the six band members into four "ProjeKcts" of various lineups.[15] Each ProjeKct performed several live shows and wrote together, serving as "research and development" units for the full King Crimson incarnation.[14]

Touch guitarist Trey Gunn was a mainstay of the King Crimson lineup during the 1990s and early 2000s.
Touch guitarist Trey Gunn was a mainstay of the King Crimson lineup during the 1990s and early 2000s.

The ProjeKcts spawned several studio and live recordings, which were issued in 1999 as part of The ProjeKcts box set.[16] By this time the lineup of King Crimson was a "Double Duo" consisting of Belew, Fripp, Gunn and Mastoletto, following the departures of Bruford and Levin.[1] The band released two new studio albums, The Construkction of Light and The Power to Believe, before Gunn announced in November 2003 that he was leaving to explore new musical opportunities.[17] Levin returned to take his place.[1] Rehearsals subsequently began for planned new material, with a string of rehearsal sessions taking place in September 2004,[18] before the group disbanded for a third time.[1]

In June 2007, Fripp announced that a new lineup of King Crimson had been finalised for the band's 40th anniversary tour the following year.[19] In addition to the members of the 2004 incarnation, Gavin Harrison of Porcupine Tree was added as a second drummer.[20] The tour took place in August 2008,[21] after which members returned to focus on other projects.[1] In September 2013, despite claiming the previous year that he was retiring, Fripp announced another reformation of King Crimson.[22] In addition to Levin, Mastoletto and Harrison, the eighth lineup was confirmed to include returning saxophonist and flautist Mel Collins, new guitarist and vocalist Jakko Jakszyk, and third drummer Bill Rieflin.[23] In March 2016, Jeremy Stacey replaced Rieflin for the year's touring,[24] ultimately remaining when Rieflin returned (switching over to only keyboards) in January 2017.[25]

Rieflin was temporarily replaced again for an autumn 2017 tour by Chris Gibson.[26] For the band's 50th anniversary tour in 2019, it was announced that Rieflin would once more be temporarily replaced, this time by Theo Travis.[27] However, after a day of rehearsal, the band opted instead to do the 2019 tour as a seven-piece.[28] Rieflin's parts were divided among other band members, with Jakszyk and Collins adding keyboards to their on-stage rigs, and Levin once again using the synthesizer he used during the 1980s tours.[29]

Members[edit]

Note: Release contributions do not include albums issued as part of the King Crimson Collector's Club, or other limited releases.

Current[edit]

Image Name Years active Instruments Release contributions
Robert Fripp.jpg
Robert Fripp
  • 1969–1974
  • 1981–1984
  • 1994–2004
  • 2007–2008
  • 2013–present
  • guitar
  • keyboards
  • mellotron
  • electronics, samples and effects
all King Crimson releases
Mel Collins (saxophonist).jpg
Mel Collins
  • 1970–1972
  • 2013–present
    (session contributor in 1970, 1974)
  • saxophones
  • flute
  • bass flute
  • mellotron (1971-72)
  • keyboards (2019-present)
  • backing vocals (1971)
Tony levin.jpg
Tony Levin
  • 1981–1984
  • 1994–1998
  • 2003–2004
  • 2007–2008
  • 2013–present
  • bass
  • touch bass
  • Chapman stick
  • synthesisers (1981-94, 2019-present)
  • backing vocals
Pat Mastelotto (2941840100).jpg
Pat Mastelotto
  • 1994–2004
  • 2007–2008
  • 2013–present
  • electronic and acoustic drums
  • acoustic and electronic percussion
all King Crimson releases from Vrooom (1994) to Live in Japan (1996), from Live in Mexico City (1999) to Vrooom Vrooom (2001), and from Happy with What You Have to Be Happy With (2002) onwards
Gavin Harrison.jpg
Gavin Harrison
  • 2007–2008
  • 2013–present
  • acoustic and electronic drums
  • electronic and acoustic percussion
all King Crimson releases from Live at the Orpheum (2015) onwards
JMJI2014.jpg
Jakko Jakszyk 2013–present
  • guitar
  • keyboards (2019-present)
  • flute
  • lead vocals
Bill Rieflin
  • 2013–2016
  • 2017–present
  • keyboards, synthesisers, mellotron (2017–2018)
  • drums, percussion, keyboards, mellotron (2013–2016)
Jeremy Stacey (percussionist).jpg
Jeremy Stacey 2016–present
  • drums
  • keyboards
all King Crimson releases from Heroes (2017) onwards

Former[edit]

Image Name Years active Instruments Release contributions
Emerson, Lake & Palmer 03.jpg
Greg Lake 1969–1970 (died 2016)
  • bass
  • lead vocals
Michael Giles 1969 (session contributor in 1970)
  • drums
  • percussion
  • backing vocals
Ian McDonald (2009).jpg
Ian McDonald 1969 (session contributor in 1974)
  • saxophones
  • flute
  • clarinet
  • bass clarinet
  • keyboards
  • mellotron
  • vibraphone
  • backing vocals
  • In the Court of the Crimson King (1969)
  • Red (1974) – two tracks only
  • Epitaph (1997)
Peter Sinfield 1969-1972
  • lyrics
  • synthesizer
  • All releases from In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) to Islands (1972)
Gordon+Haskell.jpg
Gordon Haskell 1970 (session contributor in 1970)
  • bass
  • lead vocals
  • In the Wake of Poseidon (1970) – one track only
  • Lizard (1970)
Andy McCulloch 1970 drums Lizard (1970)
Ian Wallace, Sherman Oak, California 2005.jpg
Ian Wallace 1970–1972 (died 2007)
  • drums
  • percussion
  • backing vocals
  • Islands (1971)
  • Earthbound (1972)
  • Ladies of the Road (2002)
Boz Burrell 1 - Bad Company - 1976.jpg
Raymond "Boz" Burrell 1971–1972 (died 2006)
  • bass
  • lead vocals
Bill Bruford Utrecht 2008.jpg
Bill Bruford
  • 1972–1974
  • 1981–1984
  • 1994–1997
  • drums
  • percussion
John Wetton playing bass live (cropped).jpg
John Wetton 1972–1974 (died 2017)
  • bass
  • lead vocals
  • all King Crimson releases from Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) to USA (1975)
  • The Great Deceiver (1992)
  • The Night Watch (1997)
David Cross 1972–1974
  • violin
  • viola
  • keyboards
all King Crimson releases from Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973) to USA (1975)
Jamie Muir 1972–1973 percussion Larks' Tongues in Aspic (1973)
Adrian belew copenhagen.jpg
Adrian Belew
  • 1981–1984
  • 1994–2004
  • 2007–2008
  • guitar
  • lead vocals
  • occasional drums and percussion
all King Crimson releases from Discipline (1981) to Three of a Perfect Pair: Live in Japan (1984), from Vrooom (1994) to Live in Japan (1996), from Absent Lovers: Live in Montreal (1998) to Vrooom Vrooom (2001), and from Happy with What You Have to Be Happy With (2002) to Eyes Wide Open (2003)
Tampere Jazz Happening 2005 - KTU.jpg
Trey Gunn 1994–2003
  • Warr guitar
  • Chapman stick
  • backing vocals
  • bass (1999–2003)
all King Crimson releases from Vrooom (1994) to Live in Japan (1996), from Live in Mexico City (1999) to Vrooom Vrooom (2001), and from Happy with What You Have to Be Happy With (2002) to Eyes Wide Open (2003)

Touring[edit]

Image Name Years active Instruments Details
Keith Tippett.jpg
Keith Tippett 1970
  • piano
  • keyboards
Tippett performed alongside Greg Lake, Robert Fripp and Michael Giles on Top of the Pops on 25 March 1970.[30] He has also contributed to multiple King Crimson studio albums.[31]
Chris Gibson 2017
  • keyboards
  • synthesisers
  • mellotron
Gibson temporarily replaced Bill Rieflin during an autumn 2017 concert tour.[26]
Theo Travis in Vicenza 10-05-2015.JPG
Theo Travis 2019 Travis was named as substitute for Bill Rieflin during the band's 50th anniversary tour, but was let go from the lineup during rehearsals when the band opted not to have musicians deputising for Rieflin again.[27][28]

Timeline[edit]

Lineups[edit]

King Crimson[edit]

Period Members Releases
January – December 1969
("King Crimson I")
January – April 1970
  • Greg Lake – lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Peter Sinfield - lyrics, EMS VCS 3
  • Peter Giles – bass (session)
  • Michael Giles – drums (session)
August – September 1970
December 1970 – January 1971
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Peter Sinfield - lyrics, EMS VCS 3
  • Mel Collins – woodwind, backing vocals
  • Ian Wallace – drums, percussion, backing vocals
none – rehearsals only
February 1971 – April 1972
("King Crimson II")
  • Boz Burrell – bass, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Peter Sinfield - lyrics, EMS VCS 3
  • Mel Collins – woodwind, backing vocals
  • Ian Wallace – drums, percussion, backing vocals
July 1972 – February 1973
("King Crimson III")
February 1973 – July 1974
  • John Wetton – bass, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Bill Bruford – drums, percussion
  • David Cross – violin, viola, keyboards
July – September 1974
  • John Wetton – bass, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Bill Bruford – drums, percussion
Band inactive September 1974 – April 1981
April 1981 – July 1984
("King Crimson IV")
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Bill Bruford – drums, percussion
Band inactive July 1984 – April 1994
April 1994 – May 1997
("King Crimson V")
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Trey Gunn – Warr guitar, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Bill Bruford – drums, percussion
  • Pat Mastelotto – drums, percussion
Band inactive May 1997 – December 1999
(King Crimson is split into four lineups dubbed "The ProjeKcts")
December 1999 – November 2003
("King Crimson VI")
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Trey Gunn – Warr guitar, bass, backing vocals
  • Pat Mastelotto – electronic drums, programming
November 2003 – September 2004
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards, electronics
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Pat Mastelotto – electronic drums, programming
none – rehearsals only
Band inactive September 2004 – June 2007
June 2007 – August 2008
("King Crimson VII")
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, lead vocals
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Pat Mastelotto – drums, percussion
  • Gavin Harrison – drums, percussion
none – 40th anniversary tour only
Band inactive August 2008 – September 2013
September 2013 – March 2016
("King Crimson VIII")
  • Jakko Jakszyk – guitar, lead vocals, flute
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Pat Mastoletto – drums, percussion
  • Gavin Harrison – drums, percussion
  • Bill Rieflin – drums, keyboards
  • Mel Collins – saxophone, flute
March 2016 – January 2017
  • Jakko Jakszyk – guitar, lead vocals, flute
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Pat Mastoletto – drums, percussion
  • Gavin Harrison – drums, percussion
  • Jeremy Stacey – drums, keyboards
  • Mel Collins – saxophone, flute
January 2017 – present
  • Jakko Jakszyk – guitar, lead vocals, flute
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, keyboards
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick, backing vocals
  • Bill Rieflin – keyboards
  • Pat Mastoletto – drums, percussion
  • Gavin Harrison – drums, percussion
  • Jeremy Stacey – drums, keyboards
  • Mel Collins – saxophone, flute

Spin-off bands[edit]

Period Members Releases
ProjeKct One
(December 1997)
ProjeKct Two
(November 1997 – July 1998)
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, electronics
  • Trey Gunn – touch guitar, guitar synthesisers
  • Adrian Belew – electronic drums
ProjeKct Three
(March 1999 and March 2003)
  • Robert Fripp – guitar
  • Trey Gunn – touch guitar
  • Pat Mastelotto – electronic drums, programming
ProjeKct Four
(October – November 1998)
  • Robert Fripp – guitar
  • Trey Gunn – touch guitar
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick
  • Pat Mastelotto – electronic drums, programming
ProjeKct X
(December 1999 – May 2000)
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, electronics
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, electronic drums
  • Trey Gunn – touch guitar, baritone guitar
  • Pat Mastelotto – electronic drums, programming
21st Century Schizoid Band
(2002–2004)
ProjeKct Six
(October 2006)
  • Robert Fripp – guitar
  • Adrian Belew – electronic drums
none Collector's Club releases only
Jakszyk, Fripp and Collins:
A King Crimson ProjeKct
(2010–2011)
  • Jakko Jakszyk – guitar, vocals, keyboards
  • Robert Fripp – guitar, electronics
  • Mel Collins – saxophones, flute
  • Tony Levin – bass, Chapman stick
  • Gavin Harrison – drums, percussion
The Crimson ProjeKct
(2011–2014)
  • Adrian Belew – guitar, vocals
  • Markus Reuter – touch guitar
  • Julie Slick – bass
  • Tony Levin – Chapman stick, bass, backing vocals
  • Pat Mastelotto – drums, percussion
  • Tobias Ralph – drums, percussion
  • Official Bootleg Live 2012 (2013)
  • Live in Tokyo (2014)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Eder, Bruce. "King Crimson: Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  2. ^ Fripp, Robert (7 November 2016). "King Crimson 1969: A Personal Throughview from the Guitarist". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  3. ^ Fuller, Graham (28 September 2009). "Why King Crimson are still prog-rock royalty". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  4. ^ Lynch, Dave. "Lizard - King Crimson: Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  5. ^ Smith, Sid (9 June 2018). "46 Years Ago Today". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  6. ^ Fripp, Robert (31 August 1999). "Robert Fripp's Diary: World Central Held A Mass". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  7. ^ Singleton, David (3 November 2016). "Larks Tongues in Aspic - The Long View". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  8. ^ Eder, Bruce. "Starless and Bible Black - King Crimson: Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  9. ^ DeRiso, Nick (6 October 2015). "Revisiting King Crimson's Implosion on 'Red'". Ultimate Classic Rock. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  10. ^ Hughes, Rob (31 October 2014). "Robert Fripp, interview: 'I'm a very difficult person to work with'". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  11. ^ Singleton, David (3 November 2016). "Discipline - The Long View". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  12. ^ Smith, Sid (14 March 2019). "A Perfect Trio". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  13. ^ Fripp, Robert (23 March 2012). "Robert Fripp's Diary: DGM HQ: A Sunny Day". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  14. ^ a b Planer, Lindsay. "Nashville Rehearsals - King Crimson: Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Nashville Rehearsals". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  16. ^ Hayes, Kelvin. "The ProjeKcts - King Crimson: Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  17. ^ Gunn, Trey (21 November 2003). "An Amazing Journey". Trey Gunn. Archived from the original on 2 April 2004. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  18. ^ "Sept 1, 2004: Ex Uno Plures". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  19. ^ Smith, Sid (28 June 2007). "King Crimson Confirmed For 40th Anniversary Celebrations". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  20. ^ Smith, Sid (19 November 2007). "The Return of King Crimson". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  21. ^ Kelman, John (4 September 2008). "King Crimson: King Crimson: Park West, Chicago, Illinois August 7, 2008". All About Jazz. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  22. ^ Giles, Jeff (25 September 2013). "Robert Fripp Resurrects King Crimson". Ultimate Classic Rock. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  23. ^ "King Crimson unveil new-line up and 2014 tour plans". Uncut. 25 September 2013. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  24. ^ Munro, Scott (7 March 2016). "King Crimson call up drummer Jeremy Stacey". Prog. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  25. ^ Lifton, Dave (7 January 2017). "King Crimson Will Tour The U.S. In 2017". Ultimate Classic Rock. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  26. ^ a b Smith, Sid (13 October 2017). "Chris Gibson joins Crim". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  27. ^ a b Shteamer, Hank (8 April 2019). "King Crimson's 50th Anniversary Press Day: 15 Things We Learned". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  28. ^ a b Fripp, Robert (4 May 2019). "Robert Fripp's Diary: Bredonborough". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  29. ^ Levin, Tony (9 June 2019). "Tony Levin's Road Diary: Leipzig Warmup".
  30. ^ Smith, Sid (1 April 2006). "KC Are Top Of The Pops!!!!!". Discipline Global Mobile. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  31. ^ "Keith Tippett: Credits". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 April 2019.

External links[edit]