List of Korean War flying aces

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MiG-15s photographed during combat in Korea, 1951.

Dozens of aviators were credited as flying aces in the Korean War from 1950 to 1953. The number of total flying aces, who are credited with downing five or more enemy aircraft in air-to-air combat, is disputed in the war.

The Korean War saw the first widespread use of jet engine-powered fighter aircraft for both sides of a war. Subsequently, difficulty arose in crediting the number of victories for each side, thanks in part to poor records, intentional overestimation, and the difficulty of confirming crashes in MiG alley, where the majority of air-to-air combat took place in the war. As a result, there is a large discrepancy on both sides as to the number of victories claimed versus aircraft lost, and it is extremely difficult to determine the accuracy of many victories. The ace status of dozens of pilots still remains in question.

Aviators from four nations may have qualified as aces during the Korean War; between six and nine aces have been estimated for China and up to four in North Korea. Pilots of the Soviet Union had the most difficulty confirming victories and accurately determining which pilots achieved ace status, and between 34 and 60 pilots from that nation have been postulated as possible aces in the war. For the United Nations, the United States was the only country with pilots to attain ace status, with 40. No pilot from another UN country attained ace status, though many claimed victories. Among these, Royal Canadian Air Force pilot Ernest A. Glover claimed three victories.[1]

Controversy[edit]

The status of many claimed aces in the Korean War has been increasingly debated as more data becomes available, showing that instances of over-claiming abounded on both sides.

An example of this occurred on 20 May 1951, when the war's largest fighter battle to date took place between 28 F-86 Sabres and 30 MiG-15s. After this battle the Americans claimed three MiGs (including two for James Jabara) and the Soviets claimed four Sabres (including one for Yevgeny Pepelyaev). In fact, each side lost only one aircraft.[2]

The Americans claimed that Jobara was their first jet ace after the 20 May combat but, apart from the discrepancy on that date, he was also credited with a kill in a 12 April 1951 combat in which the Americans claimed a total of 11 MiGs shot down when the Soviets actually lost only one fighter. For their part, the Soviets claimed 15 Boeing B-29 kills on that date when the Americans only lost four in the combat itself and six written-off later.[3]

Compounding the problem, both sides were using jet engine-powered fighter aircraft on a large scale for the first time, and the high speeds of combat made visual identification of damaged and destroyed aircraft difficult. USAF pilots were credited with a kill if the gun camera showed their guns striking the enemy aircraft even if no one actually saw it go down. After the war the USAF reviewed its figures in an investigation code-named Sabre Measure Charlie and downgraded the kill ratio of the North American F-86 Sabre against the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 by half.[4] The Soviets also had lax standards for confirming kills at the beginning of the war, leading to widespread over-claiming.[5] Both sides made extensive use of gun cameras to better track effectiveness, but Soviet cameras were less effective, further contributing to over-claiming.[6]

Records from the United Nations show that 40 American pilots reached ace status. However, records from China, the Soviet Union, and North Korea conflict widely and accounts vary on how many aircraft on each side were lost and who is credited with the victories.[7] Air victory claims, which are often controversial between two sides of a war, were particularly difficult to measure in Korea thanks to the difficulty recovering crashed aircraft and confirming losses, as well as poor records for the two sides which fought the bulk of their engagements in an area known as MiG Alley.[8][9]

The number of aircraft lost during the war is in dispute among both the UN and the Soviet bloc nations.[10] UN pilots claim 840 aircraft shot down during the war, while Chinese, Soviet, and North Korean sources indicate only 600 were lost among the three nations, including non-combat losses. Conversely, the Soviet Union sources claim to have shot down 800 UN aircraft, while the US claims to have lost only 100 aircraft in combat (despite listing 4053 dead aircrew - an average of 40 per aircraft lost[11]). Overestimation of victories on both sides has been attributed to the stress and confusion of air combat situations during the war, as well as the tendency for pilots to deliberately exaggerate claims for career advancement.[8] Historians suggest that numbers in these nations were deliberately exaggerated for propaganda purposes and to appease their superiors. For example, Soviet pilots faced penalties for perceived failure or ineffectiveness, making inaccurate or false claims of victories more common.[12] Conversely, data-matching with Soviet records shows that US pilots claimed up to 400 per cent more kills in some combats than they actually achieved, and that they routinely attributed their own combat losses to landing accidents and other causes.[13]

The Soviet bloc nations claim to have destroyed a combined total of between 1,000 and 1,600 UN aircraft in air-to-air combat, the most common number in sources being 1,106 UN aircraft total, including 651 F-86 Sabres. The most authoritative Soviet numbers indicate 1,016 UN aircraft, including 595 Sabres. Chinese sources claim an additional 330 victories, including 211 Sabres. The most common number used is a total of 271 victories for China and North Korea.[14] Other, more recent works claim 1,337 UN aircraft.[15]

During the entire course of the war, UN air forces lost about 3,000 aircraft. The United States Air Force (USAF) reported a total of 1,466 aircraft lost to all causes.[16] with 757 of them lost to enemy action.[15] Of these only 139 were destroyed in air-to-air combat, with another 305 unknown or missing. Of these, just 78 Sabres were listed as lost in combat, with 26 missing.[14] The United States Navy and United States Marine Corps lost 1,248 aircraft to all causes[17] and the other UN countries lost about 300 aircraft.

Tallying claims for the many Soviet pilots who claim to have achieved ace status is extremely difficult. The system of claims awards in the Soviet Union was unclear and appears to have been highly inconsistent during the war. There is also no single list of victories for each pilot in the Soviet Union, with numbers instead drawn from after action reports and accounts from pilots and unit leaders. These complications, in addition to the intentional exaggeration of kills in order to please superiors, means that the about 50 Soviet pilots claiming ace status have a total number of victories which far exceeds the number of aircraft the UN lost in the Korean War's air battles.[7] Realizing the chronic problem with false claims, Soviet leaders began to tighten the criteria for confirming victories in 1952. As a result, far fewer Soviet pilots were made aces in the second half of the war.[18]

Similarly, data-matching shows that US aces also over-claimed. [19] For example, the US claimed that James Jabara became the world's first jet-versus-jet ace during his first tour of duty, but Soviet data shows he didn't achieve ace status until his second tour.

List of aces[edit]

China[edit]

Various sources claim that between six and nine Chinese pilots attained ace status during the course of the war.[7] A USAF report listed six Chinese pilots attained ace status during the Korean War.[20] Although all Chinese aces have received the title Combat Hero in acknowledgement of their services,[21] very little information is known of the Chinese pilots during the war due to the lack of published records.[22]

  This with the * indicates that the pilot was either killed in action or killed in a training event during the war.
  This indicates that certain historians have expressed doubt regarding the ace status of the pilot listed.

Photo Name Service Rank Victories Unit Aircraft Notes
Zhao Baotong PLAAF.jpg
Zhao Baotong PLAAF not applicable[note 1] 9[20] 3rd Fighter Aviation Division[23] MiG 15 First Chinese pilot to achieve ace status.[23] Also known as Chao Bao Tun.[22]
Wang Hai in Korean War.jpg
Wang Hai PLAAF not applicable 9[20] 3rd Fighter Aviation Division[24] MiG 15 Although the USAF report listed Wang's nine victories, historian Zhang Xiaoming contended that only four victories were actual kills while other five were damages.[24] Also known as Van Hai.[20]
Li Han PLAAF not applicable 8[20] 4th Fighter Aviation Division[25] MiG 15 First Chinese pilot credited with shooting down a U.S. aircraft.[25]
Lu Min PLAAF not applicable 8[20] 12th Fighter Aviation Division[26] MiG 15 Later purged due to alleged connections with Marshal Lin Biao's coup attempt against Mao Zedong.[27]
Fan Wanzhang PLAAF.jpg
Fan Wanzhang* PLAAF not applicable 8[20] 3rd Fighter Aviation Division[21] MiG 15 Also known as Fan Van Chou.[22] Killed in action on August 8, 1952.[21]
Sun Shenlu PLAAF.jpg
Sun Shenglu* PLAAF not applicable 6[20] 3rd Fighter Aviation Division[28] MiG 15 Killed in action on December 3, 1952 near the Ch'ongch'on River.[28]
Liu Yudi in Korean War.jpg
Liu Yudi PLAAF not applicable 6[21] 3rd Fighter Aviation Division[29] MiG 15 Although Liu was credited with four victories during a single mission on November 23, 1951, USAF records indicated that only two F-84 were actually damaged with no aircraft lost.[30]

North Korea[edit]

There is some controversy as to whether any pilots of the North Korean People's Air Force attained ace status. Various sources claim there were either zero, two or four aces from North Korea.[7] Research by the USAF in 1999 concluded two North Korean pilots may have attained the status.[20] However, historian Michael J. Varhola subsequently contended that Chinese and Soviet records indicate it is unlikely any North Korean pilots attained enough victories for ace status.[22]

  This with the * indicates that the pilot was either killed in action or killed in a training event during the war.
  This indicates that certain historians have expressed doubt regarding the ace status of the pilot listed.

Name Service Rank Victories Unit Aircraft Notes
Kam Den Dek KPAF unknown 8 1st Air Division MiG 15 Ace status disputed.[20]
Kim Di San KPAF unknown 6 1st Air Division MiG 15 Ace status disputed.[20]

Soviet Union[edit]

Various sources claim between 43 and 60 pilots from the Soviet Union attained ace status in the war.[7] Most sources claim around 50 pilots attained ace status during the Korean War, of whom many are very controversial.[14] Research by the USAF named 52 pilots who may have had legitimate claim to the title. Little is known of some of the pilots and their combined tally is incompatible with the number of aircraft the USAF claims to have lost in the war.[7] Subsequent independent sources generally agree the number of aces claimed was around 52, but 15 names differ among the lists, particularly lower-scoring pilots. The number of victories for virtually all of the ace pilots is subject to dispute. Listed are names of 67 Soviet pilots attributed as aces in various sources. Of these, the ace status of 30 are in question among historians.[31]

  This with the * indicates that the pilot was either killed in action or killed in a training event during the war.
  This indicates that certain historians have expressed doubt regarding the ace status of the pilot listed.

Name Service Rank[31] Victories[20] Unit[31] Aircraft Notes
Nikolai Sutyagin VVS Major 22 17th Fighter Air Regiment, 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 The 'Ace of Aces' in the Korean War, with the highest number of kills for any pilot. Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union.[32][33]
Yevgeny Pepelyaev VVS Colonel 20 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union.[32] Various sources credit Pepelyaev with 19, 20, or 23 aircraft. Of the issue, Pepelyaev claimed he was "absolutely sure" of only six of his victories, of which he had seen only two of the aircraft crash into the ground.[14]
Lev Schukin VVS Captain 15 18th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Alexander Smorchkov VVS Lieutenant colonel 15 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Dmitry Oskin VVS Major 14 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Number of victories is disputed, and may be 11.[20]
Mikhail Ponomaryev VVS Major 14 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Number of victories is disputed, and may be 11.[20]
Sergey Kramarenko VVS Captain 13 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union. Scored between 3 and 14 victories in World War II. He is one of four Soviet pilots to claim ace status in both wars. One of Kramarenko's victories in Korea is disputed.[32]
Ivan Suchkov VVS Captain 12 176th Guards Fighter Regiment MiG 15 Number of victories is disputed and may be 10.[20]
Konstantin Sheberstov VVS Major 12 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Number of victories is disputed. In 1951, he made a false claim on one of Yevgeny Pepelyaev's victories and was exposed, disgracing Sheberstov.[32]
Stepan Bakhayev VVS Major 11 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Nikolai Dokashenko VVS Captain 11 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Grigoy Okhay VVS Captain 11 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Also claimed 6 or 8 victories in World War II.[34]
Yevgeny Pomaz VVS unknown 11 494th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Dmitry Samoilov VVS Senior lieutenant 10 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Pavel Milaushkin VVS Captain 10 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Grigory Pulov VVS Lieutenant colonel 10 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Number is disputed, and may be 8.[20]
Mikhail Mihin VVS Captain 9 518th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union.[18]
Serafim Subbotin VVS Major 9 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union. Some sources claim Subbotin had up to 15 victories, though most sources agree on 9.[32]
Vladimir Zabelin VVS Major 9 256th Fighter Air Regiment and 821st Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Grigory Ges VVS Captain 8 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Also claimed 5 victories in World War II. Some sources claim Ges may have had up to 10 victories, though most sources agree on 8.[34]
Vladimir Alfeev VVS Captain 7 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources.[35]
Pavel Antonov VVS Major 7 18th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Nikolai Babonin VVS unknown 7 18th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Semyon Fedorets VVS Major 7 913th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Lev Ivanov VVS Captain 7 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Aleksandr Karasev VVS Lieutenant colonel 7 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[31]
Aleksey Mitusov VVS Lieutenant colonel 7 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Vasily Shulev VVS Captain 7 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Nikolai Volkov VVS Captain 7 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Ivan Zaplavnev VVS Captain 7 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Stepan Artemchenko VVS Major 6 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35] Also claimed 6 kills in World War II
Arkady Boitsov VVS Major 6 16th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union.[18]
Boris Bokach VVS Captain 6 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Vladimir Khvostontsev VVS unknown 6 unknown MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report as an ace.[20] Other sources credit him with three kills.
Nikolai Ivanov VVS unknown 6 726th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Aleksey Kalyuzhniy VVS Major 6 Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Anatoly Nikolayev VVS unknown 6 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Pavel Nikulin VVS unknown 6 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report as an ace.[20] Other sources credit him with one kill.
Fyodor Shebanov* VVS Senior lieutenant 6 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Killed in action 29 October 1951.[36]
Sergey Vishnyakov VVS Colonel 6 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Nikolai Zameskin VVS Major 6 878th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Boris Abakumov VVS Captain 5 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Anatoly Bashman VVS Major 5 148th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Vasily Belousov VVS unknown 5 324th Fighter Air Division (IAD), 303rd Fighter Air Division (IAD) MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Grigory Berelidze VVS Captain 5 224th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Georgy Bogdanov VVS unknown 5 unknown MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Sergey Bychkov VVS Captain 5 17th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not the US Air Force.[35]
Nikolai Gerasimenko VVS unknown 5 18th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Sergey Danilov VVS unknown 5 unknown MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Grigory Dmitryuk VVS Major 5 821st Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Nikolai Goncharov VVS Captain 5 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Anatoly Karelin VVS Major 5 351st Fighter Air Regiment, 303rd Fighter Air Division (IAD) MiG 15 Awarded Hero of the Soviet Union.[18]
Viktor Kolyadin VVS Lieutenant colonel 5 28th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[31]
Nikolai Korniyenko VVS Captain 5 18th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Aleksandr Kochegarov VVS unknown 5 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Vasily Lepikov VVS unknown 5 415th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Viktor Muravyov VVS Captain 5 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Stepan Naumenko VVS Captain 5 29th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 First Soviet ace in the war, scoring his fifth kill on December 24, 1950.[31]
Boris Obraztsov* VVS unknown 5 176th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Killed in action. Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
Afanasy Olenitsa VVS Major 5 821st Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Viktor Popov VVS Captain 5 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Aleksey Prudnikov VVS unknown 5 821st Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by the USAF report but not independent sources.[20]
German Shatalov* VVS Senior lieutenant 5 523rd Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Killed in action November 28, 1951. Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[31]
Boris Siskov VVS Captain 5 224th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Final soviet ace of the war, scoring his fifth victory on July 20, 1953.[35]
Nikolai Shelamanov VVS Captain 5 196th Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15
Vasily Stepanov VVS Senior lieutenant 5 18th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 Listed by independent sources but not the USAF report.[35]
Nikolai Shkodin VVS unknown 5 147th Guards Fighter Air Regiment MiG 15 The USAF report found Shkodin had been credited with 5 victories but could only confirm three of them. Independent sources do not list Shkodin on lists of aces.[20]

United States[edit]

Of 40 United States military servicemen who attained ace status in Korea, all but one of them flew primarily the F-86 Sabre during their air-to-air fights. Early in the war against the older North Korean People's Air Force aircraft, US pilots flew a variety of aircraft including the F-51 Mustang, F-80 Shooting Star and F-82 Twin Mustang. However, with the introduction of the MiG-15 when the People's Liberation Army Air Force entered the war, only the Sabre fighter could match the Soviet-built fighters in single combat.[37]

Similarly to the Chinese and Soviet aces, the kill totals of many American pilots are disputed. Their combined tally is incompatible with recorded losses by communist forces, and data-matching with Soviet records shows that many of the aces' claimed kills were erroneous. In some cases, American pilots over-claimed by 400 per cent after air combat.[38]

The pilots who attained ace status in the war scored a disproportionate number of kills in the war. Of 1,000 fighter pilots who served in the war, only 355 were credited with aerial victories. A total of 756.5 victories were credited for aircraft shot down by the UN, with the 40 aces shooting down a total of 310.5 aircraft, or 40 percent of the total. The top five aces are credited with a combined ten percent of the UN aircraft victories of the war.[39] In addition to the 40 pilots who attained ace status in the Korean War, another 17 US pilots who had been aces in World War II claimed additional kills in the Korean War. Two Canadian World War II aces, J. Lindsay and John McKay, also garnered additional kills in the war.[20]


  This with the * indicates that the pilot was either killed in action or killed in a training event during the war.

Photo Name[1] Service Rank Victories[40] Unit Aircraft Notes
Joseph McConnell.JPG Joseph C. McConnell USAF Captain 16 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Was a navigator for the B-24 Liberator during World War II. Killed in a 1954 training accident.[40]
JamesJabaraPortrait1940s.jpg James Jabara USAF Major 15 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre America's first jet ace. Also claimed 1.5 kills (1 shared) flying a P-51 Mustang in World War II.[1]
Capt. Manuel J. Fernandez Jr. of the 34th Fighter Intercepter Wing.jpg Manuel J. "Pete" Fernandez USAF Captain 14.5 (1 Shared) 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Killed in a 1980 aircraft crash.[1][41]
George Andrew Davis.jpg George A. Davis* USAF Major 14 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Shot down 10 February 1952. His death generated controversy between China and the Soviet Union, in which both MiG pilots Zhang Jihui and Mikhail A. Averin had claimed to be his assailant.[41] Received the Medal of Honor for his actions and posthumously promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel. Also claimed 7 kills in the P-47 Thunderbolt in World War II.[1]
Royal N. Baker.jpg Royal N. "King" Baker USAF Colonel 13 48th Fighter Group F-86 Sabre Also claimed 3.5 kills (1 shared) in World War II.[1]
Frederick Blesse portrait.jpg Frederick C. "Boots" Blesse USAF Major 10 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron P-51 Mustang
F-80 Shooting Star
F-86 Sabre
Harold E Fischer.jpg Harold E. Fischer USAF First Lieutenant 10 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Shot down and captured in China on April 7, 1953.[42]
Col James K. Johnson.jpg James K. Johnson USAF Colonel 10 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Also claimed 1 kill in World War II.[1]
Lonnie Moore.jpg Lonnie R. Moore USAF Captain 10 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Killed in a 1956 aircraft crash.[1][40]
Ralph Parr.jpg Ralph Parr USAF Captain 10 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre [1]
Vermont Garrison.jpg Vermont Garrison USAF Lieutenant Colonel 10 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Also claimed 7.3 kills (1 Shared among three pilots) in World War II[1]
Cecil G. Foster.jpg Cecil G. Foster USAF Captain 9 16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
James F. Low.jpg James F. Low USAF First Lieutenant 9 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
James P. Hagerstrom.jpg James P. Hagerstrom USAF Major 8.5 (1 Shared) 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
67th Fighter-Bomber Squadron
F-86 Sabre Also claimed 6 kills in World War II.[1]
James Robinson Risner in flight suit.jpg James Robinson "Robbie" Risner USAF Major 8 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
George Ruddell.jpg George I. Ruddell USAF Lieutenant Colonel 8 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Henry Buttelmann.jpg Henry Buttelmann USAF First Lieutenant 7 25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Was the youngest American ace of the war, claiming 5 victories in 12 days.[1]
Clifford D. Jolley.jpg Clifford D. Jolley USAF Captain 7 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Leonard W. Lilley USAF Captain 7 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Donald E. Adams.jpg Donald E. Adams* USAF Major 6.5 (1 Shared) 16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Killed in an airshow crash on August 30, 1952.[43]
Mb-gabreski-1956.jpg Francis S. "Gabby" Gabreski USAF Colonel 6.5 (1 Shared) 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing,
51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing
F-86 Sabre Also claimed 28 kills in World War II.[1]
George L. Jones USAF Lieutenant Colonel 6.5 (1 Shared) 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing
F-86 Sabre
Winton W. Marshall.jpg Winton W. Marshall USAF Major 6.5 (1 Shared) 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
John F. Bolt 1953.jpg John F. Bolt USMC Major 6 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Also claimed 6 kills in World War II.[1]
James H Kasler.jpg James H. Kasler USAF First Lieutenant 6 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Robert J. Love.jpg Robert J. Love USAF Captain 6 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
William T. Whisner 2.jpg William T. Whisner USAF Major 5.5 (1 Shared) 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron
F-86 Sabre Also claimed 16.4 kills in World War II
Robert P. Baldwin.jpg Robert P. Baldwin USAF Colonel 5 16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron
F-86 Sabre
Richard S. Becker USAF Captain 5 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Bettinger.jpg Stephen L. Bettinger USAF Major 5 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Also claimed 1 kill in World War II.[1] Was the final American ace of the war with his final victory claimed on July 20, 1953. Was subsequently shot down and taken prisoner.[44]
Lt Guy Bordelon USN fighter ace Korea.jpeg Guy Bordelon USN Lieutenant (navy) 5 Composite Squadron 3 F4U-5NL Corsair Only US Navy aviator to be awarded ace status.[44]
Richard D. Creighton USAF Major 5 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Clyde A. Curtin.jpg Clyde A. Curtin USAF Captain 5 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Ralph D. "Hoot" Gibson USAF Colonel 5 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre]
Iven Kincheloe photo portrait head and shoulders.jpg Iven C. Kincheloe USAF Captain 5 25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Killed in a 1958 aircraft crash.[45]
Robert T. Latshaw.jpg Robert T. Latshaw USAF Captain 5 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre
Robert H. Moore.jpg Robert H. Moore USAF Captain 5 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron
F-86 Sabre
Dolph Overton.jpg Dolphin D. Overton USAF Captain 5 16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Attained Ace status in the shortest time of any American pilot in the war with five victories in four days.[44]
Harrison Thyng.jpg Harrison R. Thyng USAF Colonel 5 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing
F-86 Sabre Also claimed 5 kills in World War II. Credited to have shot down pilots of more nationalities of any American ace, with victories against Nazi Germany, Vichy France and the Empire of Japan.[44]
Willaim Wescott.jpg William Westcott USAF Major 5 25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron,
51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing
F-86 Sabre
Lieutenant General Charles Cleveland.jpg Charles G. Cleveland USAF First Lieutenant 5 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-86 Sabre Fifth victory was not recognized by the US Air Force until 2008.[46]

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The Chinese military did not have military ranks until 1955.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Varhola 2000, p. 42
  2. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20130604071241/http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_315.shtml
  3. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20130604071241/http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_315.shtml
  4. ^ Brune 1996, p. 215
  5. ^ Krylov & Tepsurkaev 2008, p. 7
  6. ^ Krylov & Tepsurkaev 2008, p. 8
  7. ^ a b c d e f Werrell 2005, p. 214
  8. ^ a b Werrell 2005, p. 141
  9. ^ Krylov & Tepsurkaev 2008, p. 6
  10. ^ Krylov & Tepsurkaev 2008, p. 9
  11. ^ https://www.dpaa.mil/portals/85/Documents/KoreaAccounting/korwald_all.pdf
  12. ^ Werrell 2005, p. 142
  13. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20130604071241/http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_315.shtml
  14. ^ a b c d Werrell 2005, p. 143
  15. ^ a b Werrell 2005, p. 213
  16. ^ Futrell 1961, p. 645
  17. ^ Hallion 1986, p. 286
  18. ^ a b c d Krylov & Tepsurkaev 2008, p. 86
  19. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20130604071241/http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_315.shtml
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Bowers, Al (1999-05-17), Fighter Pilot Aces, United States Air Force, retrieved 2011-08-28
  21. ^ a b c d 中华英雄鏖战世界强敌 抗美援朝"战斗英雄"全景扫描 (Profiles on Combat Heroes During the Korean War) (in Chinese), Beijing, China: Xinhua, 2010-10-26, retrieved 2011-08-29
  22. ^ a b c d Varhola 2000, p. 44
  23. ^ a b Zhang 2004, p. 149.
  24. ^ a b Zhang 2004, p. 152.
  25. ^ a b Zhang 2004, p. 105.
  26. ^ Zhang 2004, p. 193.
  27. ^ 林彪叛逃后的林立衡:1974年曾自杀 (Lin Biao's Daughter After Father's Downfall: Suicide Attempts in 1974) (in Chinese), Beijing, China: Xinhua, 2010-11-25, archived from the original on 2010-11-28, retrieved 2011-08-29
  28. ^ a b 空中突击手孙生禄 (Sun Shenlu: The Aerial Vanguard) (in Chinese), Beijing, China: Xinhua, 2003-10-25, retrieved 2011-08-29
  29. ^ Zhang 2004, p. 153.
  30. ^ Zhang 2004, p. 155.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g Krylov & Tepsurkaev 2008, p. 88
  32. ^ a b c d e Werrell 2005, p. 216
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Sources[edit]