List of LGBT awareness periods

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The following are lists of internationally-recognized and domestically-recognized LGBTIQ+ awareness periods, i.e. awareness days, weeks and months that focus on LGBTIQ+ matters.[1]

Internationally-recognized[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
Agender Pride Day 19 May 2017 A day celebrated internationally[2][3] to promote awareness of agender individuals.[4]
Aromantic Spectrum Awareness Week[5] The week after 14 February (Sunday-Saturday)[6] 2014 A week to promote information and awareness about aromantic spectrum identities (“a sexuality within the LGBTQIA+ community in which someone doesn't experience romantic attraction."[7]) and the issues they face.[8] This week was first recognized from 10-17 November 2014, under the name Aromantic Awareness Week. In 2015, it was moved to late February and the name was changed to Aromantic Spectrum Awareness Week, to be more inclusive of all arospec identities.[9]
International Asexuality Day 6 April 2021 IAD is a coordinated worldwide campaign promoting the ace umbrella, including demisexual, grey-asexual and other ace identities.[10][11][12]

The four themes of IAD are Advocacy, Celebration, Education and Solidarity.[13]

Asexual Awareness Week Last full week in October 2010 Week to promote awareness of those on the asexual spectrum.[14] It was founded by Sara Beth Brooks in 2010.[15][16]
Bisexual Awareness Week 16-22 September 2014 Also referred to as BiWeek and Bisexual+ Awareness Week.[17]
Celebrate Bisexuality Day 23 September 1999 Also referred to as Bisexual Pride Day, CBD, Bisexual Pride, and Bi Visibility Day.[18]
Drag Day 16 July 2009 A day that aims to celebrate and recognize the drag art all around the world.[19] Created by Adam Stewart[20] in 2009 through his Facebook fan page[21] for drag queens.[22]
International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia 17 May 2005 The main purpose of the 17 May mobilizations is to raise awareness of violence, discrimination, abuse, and repression of LGBT communities worldwide.
Intersex Awareness Day 26 October 1996 Celebrated in October to commemorate the first intersex protest, which took place in Boston, Massachusetts.[23]
Intersex Day of Remembrance 8 November[24] 2005 A day designed to raise awareness of the issues faced by intersex people. It marks the birthday of Herculine Barbin, a French intersex person. The event began as Intersex Solidarity Day, following an invitation issued by Joëlle-Circé Laramée, the then Canadian spokeswoman for Organization Intersex International.[25]
Lesbian Day[26] 8 October 1980 (NZ) or 1990 (Aus)[27] An annual day celebrating lesbian culture that originated in New Zealand and Australia,[28] but is now celebrated internationally.[29]
Lesbian Visibility Day 26 April 2008 Annual day to celebrate, recognize, and bring visibility to lesbians.[30][31][32]
National Coming Out Day 11 October 1988[33] A day to celebrate the act of "coming out", i.e. when an LGBT person decides to publicly share their gender identities or sexual orientation.[34] National Coming out Day was founded in the United States by gay rights activists Robert Eichberg and Jean O' Leary on 1988 in Washington, DC, United States. By 1990 it was being celebrated in all 50 states.[35] Although still named "National Coming Out Day", it is currently observed around the world, in countries such as Canada, Germany, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and Australia also on 11 October, and in the United Kingdom on 12 October.
Non-Binary Awareness Week The week, starting Sunday[36]/Monday,[37] surrounding 14 July 2020[38][39] A week dedicated to those who do not fit within the traditional gender binary,[40] i.e. those who do not exclusively identify as a man or a woman, or who may identify as both a man and a woman, or may fall outside of these categories altogether.[41] Promoted on Twitter as @NBWeek.[42]
Non-Binary People's Day 14 July 2012 An annual day to celebrate and bring visibility to people who are non-binary in the LGBT+ community. The date is the precise midpoint between International Men's Day and International Women's Day.[43]
Pansexual & Panromantic Awareness Day 24 May[44] 2015 An annual day to promote awareness of, and celebrate, pansexual and panromantic identities.
Pronouns Day The third Wednesday in October 2018 An annual event that seeks to make sharing, respecting and educating about personal pronouns commonplace.[45][46][47]
Trans Awareness Month November[48][49] 2017 A month to celebrate transgender and gender nonconforming communities and to raise awareness for this community through education and advocacy activities.
Trans Awareness Week 13-19 November[50] 2017 A week to educate about transgender and gender non-conforming people, and the issues associated with their transition and/or identity.
Transgender Day of Remembrance 20 November 1999 Day to memorialize those who have been murdered as a result of transphobia.
Trans Day of Visibility 31 March[51] 2009[52] A day to celebrate the trans community in a positive light, celebrating their lives and cultural achievements. This observance date was founded in 2009 by transgender activist Rachel Crandall (Michigan, United States),[53] the head of Transgender Michigan,[54] as a reaction to the lack of a day celebrating transgender people.
Trans Parent Day The first Sunday in November[55] 2009[56] A day that celebrates life and the love between transgender parents and their children, and between parents and their transgender children.[57]
Zero Discrimination Day 1 March[58] 2014 A United Nations (UN) recognized day[59] promoting equality before the law, and in practice, throughout all of the member countries of the UN. This day was first celebrated by the UN on 1 March 2014, after UNAIDS (a UN program on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and (AIDS)) propelled its Zero Discrimination Campaign on World AIDS Day in December 2013.[60]

Domestically-recognized[edit]

Australia[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
LGBT History Month October 1994 Based on a similarly-named awareness period in the United States, this is a month encouraging openness and education about LGBTI history and rights.
Mardi Gras Parade The first Saturday of March 1978 A day in the annual Mardi Gras festival held in the Australia state of New South Wales which features a pride parade, commemorating the first rally in 1978 where numerous participants were arrested by the police. The current Mardi Gras Parade maintains the original rallies' political flavour, with many of the marching groups and floats promoting LGBTQI rights issues and/or themes.
Wear it Purple Day The final Friday of August 2010 A day to foster supportive, safe, empowering and inclusive environments for rainbow young people. The day was co-founded by Katherine Hudson and Scott Williams.[61] Comparable days exist in a number of other countries, including the Netherlands (Purple Friday) and the United States (Spirit Day).

Canada[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
LGBT History Month October 1994 Based on a similarly-named awareness period in the United States, this is a month encouraging openness and education about LGBTI history and rights.

Chile[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
Lesbian Visibility Day 9 July 2015 Commemorates the anniversary of Mónica Briones' murder, the first documented act of lesbophobia in Chile.

Ireland[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
Irish Marriage Referendum 22 May 2015 A commemoration of Ireland legalizing same-sex marriage through a plebiscite.

Netherlands[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
Purple Friday The second Friday of December 2010 A day aimed at reducing bullying and increasing inclusivity in schools, using a purple theme in which people are encouraged to wear purple clothes. In December 2010, COC Nederland named the second Friday of December "Paarse Vrijdag" (Dutch: Purple Friday).[62] The Gender Sexuality Alliance Network has continued to celebrate its observance annually since then.[63] Comparable days exist in a number of other countries, including Australia (Wear it Purple Day) and the United States (Spirit Day).

United States[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
Bisexual Health Awareness Month March 2014 A month to raise awareness about the bisexual+ community's social, economic, and health disparities, advocate for resources, and inspire actions to improve bi+ people's well-being.[64] Promoted on social media through #BiHealthMonth.[65]
Day of Silence The second Friday in April 1996 A student-orientated day to end the silencing effect of anti-LGBT bias. Initially created by then-student Maria Pulzetti, the first event was organized by students at University of Virginia in 1996.[66] It is currently organized by GLSEN. In 1997, one year after the day's creation, it went national, with over 100 institutions participating.[67] Whilst there has been some participation from other countries, including New Zealand and Singapore, as of 2021 it is still categorized as a "national student-led demonstration".[68]
Harvey Milk Day 22 May 2010 Celebrated to honor Harvey Milk, assassinated politician, on his birthday. It is celebrated officially in California, Milk's home state.[69]
HIV Long-Term Survivors Awareness Day 5 June 2014 A day to highlight the resilience and strengths of people living longest with HIV and AIDS, while pointing out the challenges facing this population and demanding action to improve their quality of life.[70] It was started by Tez Anderson, founder of Let's Kick ASS (LKA)[71] and promoted on social media using #HLTSAD.[72]
LGBT History Month October 1994 It was declared a national history month by President Barack Obama in 2009. The month was created with the intent to encourage openness and education about LGBT history and rights.
LGBT Pride Month June[73][74][75] June is celebrated as Pride in honor of the Stonewall Riots, though Pride events occur all year round. It also marks the month that same-sex marriage was legalized in the United States.
Pulse Night of Remembrance 12 June 2017 Annual day of US remembrance for the loss of 49 LGBT people in the Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida.[76]
Spirit Day The third Thursday in October[77] 2010 Support for LGBTQ+ youth who are the victims of bullying, as well as to honor LGBTQ+ victims of bullying-related suicide. Comparable days exist in a number of other countries, including Australia (Wear it Purple Day) and the Netherlands (Purple Friday).
Stonewall Riots Anniversary 28 June[78] 1969 A day to remember the Stonewall Riots, a reaction to the NYPD raid of the Stonewall Inn.[79] This initial event was a galvanizing force for LGBT political activism, and argued by some to be the birth of the gay rights movement, in the United States and around the world.[80][81] The world's first pride parade occurred on the 1st anniversary (28 June 1970).

United Kingdom[edit]

Name Date Year Started Notes
LGBT History Month February 2005 Celebrated throughout February since 2005. Founded by Schools OUT UK - The LGBT+ Education Charity.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]