List of Maryland Terrapins football seasons

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The Maryland Terrapins football team represents the University of Maryland in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS). In its 116 active years, the team has played in over a thousand games, including 23 post-season bowl game appearances. The Terrapins have been awarded 2 national championships, 11 conference champions, and 17 times received a final ranking in the Associated Press (AP) Poll. Maryland is the only Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) team to have twice secured three consecutive outright conference championships.[1][2] Many Maryland alumni have continued their playing careers in professional football, including Randy White, Boomer Esiason, Shawne Merriman, Dick Modzelewski, and Stan Jones.[3]

The modern Maryland Terrapins football program traces its beginning to the team first formed by quarterback Will Skinner in 1892 at what was then known as the Maryland Agricultural College. Since then, the Terrapins (commonly known as the "Terps") have experienced their most success under head coaches Jim Tatum, Jerry Claiborne, Bobby Ross, and Ralph Friedgen.[1][2]

Between 1947 and 1955, Jim Tatum led the Terps to two national championships, two ACC championships, a Southern Conference championship, and five bowl game appearances.[1][2] In 1952, Maryland quarterback Jack Scarbath was the runner-up to the Heisman Trophy, which is awarded to college football's most outstanding player.[4] The next year, coach Tatum led the team through an undefeated regular season. This resulted in Maryland being awarded the 1953 National Championship.[1][2]

During Jerry Claiborne's tenure, from 1972 to 1981, the team captured three consecutive ACC championships and made seven bowl game appearances, the most of any Maryland coach to date. In Bobby Ross's five years at Maryland, from 1982 to 1986, he led the team to three consecutive ACC championships and four bowl appearances.[1][2] In 1984, quarterback Frank Reich led the team to victory from a 31–0 halftime deficit against Miami in what was then the greatest comeback in NCAA football history.[5][6][nb 1] This period was marked by bitter competition for ACC primacy with 1981 national champions Clemson, and between 1974 and 1988, each team won six conference championships.[1][2]

In 1986, when Maryland basketball star Len Bias suffered a drug overdose, it sent a ripple-effect through the athletic department. Bobby Ross said that he was offended by unfounded "innuendo, insinuation and guilt by association" aimed at the football team and resigned as head coach. In the following fourteen years, Maryland had two winning seasons and appeared in one bowl game.[2][8]

In 2001, Ralph Friedgen took over a Maryland team that had one winning season in the past decade, and led them to an ACC championship and a Bowl Championship Series (BCS) game in his first season. In the following two years, Friedgen became the only ACC head coach to have led his team to win ten games in each of his first three seasons.[1][2] In his ten-year tenure, Friedgen led the Terrapins to seven bowl appearances. Most recently, Maryland concluded the 2010 season with a 9-4 record, a win in the Military Bowl, and a top 25 national ranking.

Seasons[edit]

Legend

      National Championship ‡
      Conference Championship †
      Bowl game win
      Bowl game tie
      Bowl game loss

  • "W" represents wins, "L" losses, and "T" ties.
  • A "†" indicates a conference championship.
  • A "‡" indicates both a national championship and conference championship.
  • A "♦" indicates a tie; the number of "♦"s represents the number of teams tied with Maryland.
(Example: "2nd♦♦♦" indicates Maryland tied for 2nd place with three other teams)
Maryland Terrapins
Season Head coach
Conference
Season results
[nb 2][nb 3][nb 4]
Bowl result Final ranking
Conference Division W L T AP Poll
[14][nb 5]
Coaches' Poll
[17][nb 6]
2016 D. J. Durkin Big Ten East (3-6) 5th
(2-4)
6 7 0 Quick Lane Bowl: L
v. Boston College (36-30)
2015 Randy Edsall
Mike Locksley
Big Ten East (1–7) 6th
(1–5)
3 9 0
2014 Randy Edsall Big Ten East (4–4) 3rd
(3–3)
7 6 Foster Farms Bowl: L
v. Stanford (45–21)
2013 ACC Atlantic (3–5) 5th
(1–5)
7 6 Military Bowl: L
v. Marshall (20–31)
2012 ACC Atlantic (2–6) 5th
(1–4)
4 8
2011 ACC Atlantic (1–7) 6th
(0–5)
2 10
2010 Ralph Friedgen ACC Atlantic (5–3) 2nd
(4–2)
9 4 Military Bowl: W
v. East Carolina (51–20)
23rd 24th
2009 ACC Atlantic (1–7) 6th
(1–4)
2 10
2008 ACC Atlantic (4–4) 3rd♦♦♦
(3–2)
8 5 Humanitarian Bowl: W
v. Nevada (42–35)
2007 ACC Atlantic (3–5) 5th
(2–3)
6 7 Emerald Bowl: L
v. Oregon State (14–21)
2006 ACC Atlantic (5–3) 2nd♦♦
(3–2)
9 4 Champs Sports Bowl: W
v. Purdue (24–7)
2005 ACC Atlantic (3–5) 4th♦♦
(1–4)
5 6
2004 ACC 8th
(3–5)
5 6
2003 ACC 2nd
(6–2)
10 3 Gator Bowl: W
v. West Virginia (41–7)
17th 20th
2002 ACC 2nd
(6–2)
11 3 Peach Bowl: W
v. Tennessee (30–3)
13th 13th
2001 ACC 1st
(7–1)
10 2 Orange Bowl: L
v. Florida (23–56)
11th 10th
2000 Ron Vanderlinden ACC 6th
(3–5)
5 6
1999 ACC 8th
(2–6)
5 6
1998 ACC 8th
(1–7)
3 8
1997 ACC 7th
(1–7)
2 9
1996 Mark Duffner ACC 6th
(3–5)
5 6
1995 ACC 5th
(4–4)
6 5 0
1994 ACC 7th
(2–6)
4 7 0
1993 ACC 7th
(2–6)
2 9 0
1992 ACC 8th
(2–6)
3 8 0
1991 Joe Krivak ACC 6th
(2–5)
2 9 0
1990 ACC 4th
(4–3)
6 5 1 Independence Bowl: T
v. Louisiana Tech (34–34)
1989 ACC 6th
(2–5)
3 7 1
1988 ACC 4th
(4–3)
5 6 0
1987 ACC 5th
(3–3)
4 7 0
1986 Bobby Ross ACC 5th
(2–3–1)
5 5 1
1985 ACC 1st
(6–0)
9 3 0 Cherry Bowl: W
v. Syracuse (35–18)
18th USA: 17th
UPI: 19th
1984 ACC 1st
(6–0)
9 3 0 Sun Bowl: W
v. Tennessee (28–27)
12th USA: 9th
UPI: 11th
1983 ACC 1st[nb 7]
(5–1)
8 4 0 Citrus Bowl: L
v. Tennessee (23–30)
USA: 24th
UPI: –
1982 ACC 2nd
(5–1)
8 4 0 Aloha Bowl: L
v. Washington (20–21)
20th 20th
1981 Jerry Claiborne ACC 3rd
(4–2)
4 6 1
1980 ACC 2nd
(5–1)
8 4 0 Tangerine Bowl: L
v. Florida (20–35)
1979 ACC 2nd♦♦
(4–2)
7 4 0
1978 ACC 2nd
(5–1)
9 3 0 Sun Bowl: L
v. Texas (0–42)
20th
1977 ACC 3rd
(4–2)
8 4 0 Hall of Fame Classic: W
v. Minnesota (17–7)
1976 ACC 1st
(5–0)
11 1 0 Cotton Bowl Classic: L
v. Houston (21–30)
8th 11th
1975 ACC 1st
(5–0)
9 2 1 Gator Bowl: W
v. Florida (13–0)
13th 11th
1974 ACC 1st
(6–0)
8 4 0 Liberty Bowl: L
v. Tennessee (3–7)
13th 13th
1973 ACC 2nd
(5–1)
8 4 0 Peach Bowl: L
v. Georgia (16–17)
20th 18th
1972 ACC 3rd
(3–2–1)
5 5 1
1971 Roy Lester ACC 7th
(1–5)
2 9 0
1970 ACC 6th
(2–4)
2 9 0
1969 ACC 3rd♦♦♦
(3–3)
3 7 0
1968 Bob Ward ACC 7th
(2–5)
2 8 0
1967 ACC 8th
(0–6)
0 9 0
1966 Lou Saban ACC 3rd
(3–3)
4 6 0
1965 Tom Nugent ACC 4th[nb 8]
(3–3)
4 6 0
1964 ACC 2nd♦♦
(4–3)
5 5 0
1963 ACC 5th
(2–5)
3 7 0
1962 ACC 3rd
(5–2)
6 4 0
1961 ACC 3rd
(3–3)
7 3 0
1960 ACC 3rd
(5–2)
6 4 0
1959 ACC 3rd
(4–2)
5 5 0
1958 Tommy Mont ACC 5th
(3–3)
4 6 0
1957 ACC 3rd♦♦
(4–3)
5 5 0
1956 ACC 4th[nb 9]
(2–2–1)
2 7 1
1955 Jim Tatum ACC 1st
(4–0)
10 1 0 Orange Bowl: L
v. Oklahoma (6–20)
3rd 3rd
1954 ACC 2nd
(4–0–1)
7 2 1 8th
1953 ACC 1st
(5–0)
10 1 0 Orange Bowl: L
v. Oklahoma (0–7)
1st 1st
1952 Southern[nb 10] 7 2 0 13th 13th
1951 Southern 1st
(5–0)
10 0 0 Sugar Bowl: W
v. Tennessee (28–13)
3rd 4th
1950 Southern 5th
(4–1–1)
7 2 1
1949 Southern 2nd
(4–0)
9 1 0 Gator Bowl: W
v. Missouri (20–7)
14th
1948 Southern 6th
(4–2)
6 4 0
1947 Southern 6th
(3–2–1)
7 2 2 Gator Bowl: T
v. Georgia (20–20)
1946 Clark Shaughnessy Southern 12th
(2–5)
3 6 0
1945 Bear Bryant Southern 5th
(3–2)
6 2 1
1944 Clarence Spears Southern 6th
(1–1)
1 7 1
1943 Southern 2nd
(2–0)
4 5 0
1942 Clark Shaughnessy Southern 13th
(1–2)
7 2 0
1941 Jack Faber Southern 12th
(1–2)
3 5 1
1940 Southern 12th
(0–1–1)
2 6 1
1939 Frank Dobson Southern 14th
(0–1)
2 7 0
1938 Southern 12th
(1–2)
2 7 0
1937 Southern 1st
(3–0)
8 2 0
1936 Southern 5th
(4–2)
6 5 0
1935 Jack Faber Southern 3rd
(3–1–1)
7 2 2
1934 Curley Byrd Southern 2nd
(3–1)
7 3 0
1933 Southern 9th
(1–4)
3 7 0
1932 Southern 15th
(2–4)
5 6 0
1931 Southern 5th
(4–1–1)
8 1 1
1930 Southern 5th
(4–2)
7 5 0
1929 Southern 17th
(1–3–1)
4 4 2
1928 Southern 14th
(2–3–1)
6 3 1
1927 Southern 12th♦♦
(3–5)
4 7 0
1926 Southern 17th
(1–3–1)
5 4 1
1925 Southern 20th♦♦
(0–4)
2 5 1
1924 Southern 16th
(1–2–1)
3 3 3
1923 Southern 8th
(2–1)
7 2 1
1922 Southern 11th♦♦♦♦
(1–2)
4 5 1
1921 Southern
(1–2–0)
3 5 1
1920 South Atlantic
Intercollegiate
Athletic Association

(1–1)
7 2 0
1919 South Atlantic
Intercollegiate
Athletic Association
5 4 0
1918 South Atlantic
Intercollegiate
Athletic Association
4 1 1
1917 Independent 4 3 1
1916 Independent 6 2 0
1915 Independent 6 3 0
1914
[nb 11]
Independent 5 3 0
1913
[nb 12]
Independent 6 3 0
1912 Independent 6 1 1
1911 Independent 4 4 2
1910 Royal Alston Independent 4 3 1
1909 Bill Lang
Ed Larkin[nb 13]
Independent 2 5 0
1908 Bill Lang Independent 3 8 0
1907 Charles Melick Independent 3 6 0
1906 Fred Nielsen Independent 5 3 0
1905 Independent 6 4 0
1904 John Markey Independent 2 4 2
1903 Independent 7 4 0
1902 Independent 3 5 2
1901 Emmons Dunbar Independent 1 7 0
1900 F.H. Peters Independent 3 4 1
1899 S.M. Cooke Independent 1 4 0
1898 Frank Kenly Independent 2 5 1
1897 John Lillibridge Maryland
Intercollegiate
Football Association
2 4 0
1896
[nb 14]
Grenville Lewis Maryland
Intercollegiate
Football Association
6 2 2
1895 The Maryland Agricultural College did not field a football team in 1895
1894 J.G. Bannon Maryland
Intercollegiate
Football Association
4 3 0
1893
[nb 15]
Samuel Harding Independent 6 0 0
1892 Will Skinner Independent 0 3 0
Total 598 526 41 Regular season games (1,153)
10 12 2 Bowl games (24)
626 565 43 All games (1,164)
References: [1][2][29][30][31]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ In 2006, this record was broken, when Michigan State recovered from a 35-point deficit against Northwestern in the third quarter, to win 41–38.[7]
  2. ^ Season results include bowl game results where applicable.
  3. ^ In 2005, the ACC became a divisional conference, consisting of the Atlantic Division (including Maryland) and the Coastal Division. Boston College joined the ACC as its 12th member, allowing, under NCAA regulations, the conference to re-organize into two divisions and hold a championship game.[9][10][11]
  4. ^ In 1996, the NCAA instituted overtime rules which made ties no longer possible.[12][13]
  5. ^ The AP Poll has been published continuously since 1936. The number of teams ranked has varied over time: it ranked the top-20 teams from its start until 1961, the top-10 (1962–1967), the top-20 (1968–1988), and it currently ranks the top-25 from 1989 to the presentday.[15][16]
  6. ^ From 1950 to 1990, the Coaches' Poll was featured by United Press International; from 1991 to the present day, it is featured by USA Today.[18][19]
  7. ^ In 1983, Clemson played its conference games, but with no games counting towards its or its opponents' records due to illegal recruiting practices during the 1982 season.[20][21]
  8. ^ In 1965, South Carolina was forced to forfeit all wins and its 4–2 record was amended to 0–6 due to the use of two ineligible players. Therefore, South Carolina finished in last place instead of finishing as ACC co-champions with Duke. Maryland finished the season tied for fourth-place, instead of fifth.[22]
  9. ^ In 1956, North Carolina was forced to forfeit all wins and its 2–3 record was amended to 0–5 due to the use of an ineligible player. Maryland's loss to North Carolina was counted as a win due to forfeiture.[23]
  10. ^ In 1952, Maryland was disallowed any Southern Conference games due to participation in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. This was in accordance with a Southern Conference regulation to discourage postseason play that had been adopted mid-season the previous year. Clemson was likewise sanctioned for 1952, and dissatisfaction with the rule contributed to the formation of the ACC in 1953.[24][25]
  11. ^ In 1914, the Maryland Agricultural College was awarded the state championship after defeating three of four other universities in the state of Maryland.[26]
  12. ^ In 1913, the Maryland Agricultural College was awarded the state championship after defeating four other universities in the state of Maryland.[26]
  13. ^ In 1909, Bill Lang and Edward Larkin served as co-head coaches.[2]
  14. ^ In 1896, the Maryland Agricultural College was awarded the Maryland state championship after Maryland-Baltimore forfeited a game due to an illegal use of extra players.[27]
  15. ^ In 1893, the Maryland Agricultural College was awarded the Maryland state championship and District of Columbia championship.[2][28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Maryland Terrapins". 2008 ACC Football Media Guide. Atlantic Coast Conference. 2008. Retrieved 8 December 2008. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Year-by-Year Results" (PDF). 2008 Maryland Terrapins Football Media Guide. University of Maryland. 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 June 2009. Retrieved 9 December 2008. 
  3. ^ "Terps in the Pros – Former Maryland players who have seen action in the NFL". University of Maryland Terrapins football official website. Retrieved 9 December 2008. 
  4. ^ 1952 – 18th Award Archived 2009-06-25 at WebCite, Heisman.com, retrieved 10 December 2008.
  5. ^ Pete Fiutak, 100 Greatest College Football Finishes, Scout.com, 9 July 2007, retrieved 10 December 2008.
  6. ^ College football's best of the last 20 years, USA Today, 19 November 2002.
  7. ^ Spartans stun Cats for biggest comeback in I-A history, ESPN, 21 October 2006, retrieved 16 December 2008.
  8. ^ Ross to Leave Maryland, The New York Times, 2 December 1986, retrieved 10 December 2008.
  9. ^ New ACC eager to grab football spotlight, USA Today, 26 August 2004, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  10. ^ ACC Unveils Future League Seal, Divisional Names Archived 2013-05-25 at the Wayback Machine., Atlantic Coast Conference, 18 October 2004, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  11. ^ Introduction (PDF), 2008 ACC Football Media Guide, Atlantic Coast Conference, 2008, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  12. ^ King Kaufman, Why I love college football's overtime system, Salon.com, 6 November 2002, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  13. ^ It's early, but OTs already making mark on NCAA gridiron, USA Today, 11 September 2006, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  14. ^ "Associated Press (Writers and Broadcasters) Final Polls" (PDF). Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Records. NCAA. July 2008. pp. 96–99. Retrieved 9 December 2008. 
  15. ^ All Time Final AP Football Poll, National Collegiate Athletic Association, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  16. ^ AP Football Poll Archive, AP Poll Archive, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  17. ^ "USA Today/ESPN (Coaches) Weekly Poll Leaders" (PDF). Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Records. NCAA. July 2008. pp. 101–105. Retrieved 9 December 2008. 
  18. ^ Football Almanac, The Sporting News, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  19. ^ USA Today Division I-A Coaches' Poll, American Football Coaches Association, 8 October 2006, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  20. ^ Section 1, ACC Record Book, 2008 ACC Football Media Guide, p. 110, Atlantic Coast Conference, 2008, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  21. ^ Clemson University Placed on NCAA Probation[permanent dead link], Public Infraction Report, National Collegiate Athletic Association, 22 November 1982, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  22. ^ Section 1, ACC Record Book, 2008 ACC Football Media Guide, p. 101, Atlantic Coast Conference, 2008, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  23. ^ Section 1, ACC Record Book, 2008 ACC Football Media Guide, p. 96, Atlantic Coast Conference, 2008, retrieved 11 December 2008.
  24. ^ David Ungrady, Tales from the Maryland Terrapins, p. 77–78, Sports Publishing LLC, 2003.
  25. ^ K. Adam Powell and Woody Durham, Border Wars: The First Fifty Years of Atlantic Coast Conference Football, p. xvi, Scarecrow Press, ISBN 0-8108-4839-2, 2004, retrieved 26 January 2009.
  26. ^ a b Reveille, Maryland Agricultural College Yearbook, Class of 1915, p. 172.
  27. ^ David Ungrady, Tales from the Maryland Terrapins, p. 9, Sports Publishing LLC, 2003.
  28. ^ David Ungrady, Tales from the Maryland Terrapins, p. 5, Sports Publishing LLC, 2003.
  29. ^ "Maryland Coaches and Records" (PDF). Maryland Terrapins, 2008 ACC Football Football Media Guide. Atlantic Coast Conference. 2008. Retrieved 8 December 2008. 
  30. ^ "Southern Conference Year-by-Year Statistics" (PDF). 2007 Southern Conference media guide. Southern Conference. 2007. pp. 140–142. Retrieved 9 December 2008. 
  31. ^ Conference Affiliations Archived 2009-01-21 at the Wayback Machine., Maryland Historical Data, College Football Data Warehouse, retrieved 16 December 2008.