List of Muslim feminists

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This is a list of important participants in Muslim feminism, originally sorted by surname within each period.

It may include, for instance, earlier authors who did not self-identify as feminists but have been claimed to have furthered "feminist consciousness" by a resistance of male dominance expressed in their works.

Early and mid 19th-century feminists[edit]

Born between 1801 and 1874.

Period (birth) Name Country Born Died Comments Source
1801–1874 Qasim Amin Egypt 1863 1908 early advocate of women's rights [1][2]
1801-1874 Nawab Faizunnesa Bangladesh 1834 1903 female education advocate [3]
1801-1874 Hamida Javanshir Azerbaijan 1873 1955 women's rights activist, philanthropist [4]
1801-1874 Aisha Taymur Egypt 1840 1902 social activist, novelist [5]
1801-1874 Fatma Aliye Topuz Turkey 1862 1936 women's rights activist, novelist [6]
1801-1874 Jamil Sidqi al-Zahawi Iraq 1863 1936 poet, Islamic philosopher
1911-1991 Ismat Chughtai Pakistan 1911 1991 novelist

Late 19th-century and early 20th-century feminists[edit]

Born between 1875 and 1939.

Period (birth) Name Country Born Died Comments Source
1940-2018 Iffat Ara Bangladesh 1939 writer, social activist [7]
1875-1939 Eugénie Le Brun Egypt 1908 [8]
1875–1939 Hamid Dalwai India 1932 1977 Socialist feminist
1875–1939 Tahar Haddad Tunisia 1897 1935 [9]
1875–1939 Zaib-un-Nissa Hamidullah British India 1921 2000 pioneer in (pre)Pakistan [10]
1875-1939 Shamsiah Fakeh Bangladesh 1924 2008 political leader, Malaysian nationalist [11]
1936–present Hameeda Hossain Bangladesh 1936 human rights activist, academic [12]
1875–1939 Fatima Ahmed Ibrahim Sudan 1933 2017
1875–1939 Raden Adjeng Kartini Indonesia 1879 1904 Javanese advocate for native Indonesian women, critic of polygamous marriages and lack of education opportunities for women [1]
1911–1999 Sufia Kamal Bangladesh 1911 1999 advocate, nationalist, poet [13]
1875–1939 Anbara Salam Khalidi Lebanon 1897 1986 author [14][15]
1875-1939 Shamsunnahar Mahmud Bangladesh 1908 1964 leader of the women's rights movement in Bengal [16]
1875-1939 Malak Hifni Nasif Egypt 1886 1918 [17]
1875-1939 Nizar Qabbani Syria 1923 1998 poet, progressive intellectual [18]
1875-1939 Alifa Rifaat Egypt 1930 1996 novelist [19]
1880-1932 Begum Rokeya Bangladesh 1880 1932 writer, educator [20][21][22]
1875–1939 Huda Sha'arawi Egypt 1879 1947 organiser; founder of Egyptian Feminist Union [23]
1875-1939 Hidaya Sultan al-Salem Kuwait 1936 2001 writer, campaigner, suffragist [24][25]
1875-1939 Rasuna Said Indonesia 1910 1965 political leader, nationalist [26]
1875-1939 Saiza Nabarawi Eqypt 1897 1985 journalist [27]
1937-2003 Salma Sobhan Bangladesh 1937 2003 lawyer, academic [28]
1875-1939 Nurkhon Yuldasheva Uzbekistan 1913 dancer [29]

Mid to late 20th-century and notable 21st-century feminists[edit]

Born between 1940 and 2017

Period (birth) Name Country Born Died Comments Source
1940-2018 Saleemah Abdul-Ghafur United States 1974 Global health advocate [30]
1940-2018 Sitara Achakzai Afghanistan 1956 leading Afghan women's rights activist, member of the regional parliament in Kandahar [31]
1940-2018 Jamila Afghani Afghanistan 1974 women's rights activist, created the first "gender-sensitive training in Afghanistan for Imams" [32][33]
1940-2018 Mahnaz Afkhami Iran 1941 women's rights activist, Minister without portfolio for Women's Affairs, Founder and President of Women's Learning Partnership [34][35]
1940-2018 Haleh Afshar, Baroness Afshar United Kingdom 1944 professor of politics and women's studies, member of the British House of Lords [36]
1940-2018 Nazir Afzal United Kingdom 1962 - Public prosecutor and campaigner focusing on violence against women and so-called honour crimes [37]
1940-2018 Leila Ahmed Egypt 1940 Writer on Islam and feminism [38]
1940-2018 Safia Ahmed-jan Afghanistan 1941 Afghan women's rights advocate [39]
1940-2018 Kecia Ali United States 1972 scholar on the study of Islamic Jurisprudence (fiqh) and Women [40]
1940-2018 Mariam Alhassan Alolo Ghana 1957 female Islamic missionary [41]
1940-2018 Amat Al Alim Alsoswa Yemen 1958 journalist [42]
1940-2018 Fadela Amara France 1964 politician [43]
1940-2018 Zainah Anwar Malaysia head of Sisters in Islam [44]
1940-2018 Seyran Ateş Germany 1963 lawyer [45][46]
1940-2018 Shukria Barakzai Afghanistan 1970 politician, journalist [47]
1940-2018 Farzana Bari Pakistan 1952 human rights activist [48][49]
1940-2018 Asma Barlas Pakistan 1950 academics [50]
1940-2018 Benazir Bhutto Pakistan 1953 2007 Prime Minister of Pakistan from 1988 to 1990 and from 1993 to 1996 [51]
1940-2018 Susan Carland Australia 1978 academic [52]
1940-2018 Kamala Chandrakirana Indonesia human rights activist [53]
1940-2018 Shirin Ebadi Iran 1947 ; activist, Nobel Peace Prize winner for her efforts for the rights of women and children [54]
1940-2018 Mona Eltahawy Egypt 1967 journalist [55]
1940-2018 Farid Esack South Africa 1959 Muslim scholar, gender equity commissioner
1940-2018 Zahra Eshraghi Iran 1964 activist, former government official [56][57]
1940-2018 Soumaya Naamane Guessous Morocco sociologist, women's rights activist [58]
1940-2018 Fatemeh Haghighatjoo Iran 1968 reformist politician, contributed proposing a bill to join Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women [59][60]
1940-2018 Mohammad Shafiq Hamdam Afghanistan 1981 Chairman of the Afghan Anti-Corruption Network (AACN)
1940-2018 Suheir Hammad Jordan 1973 poet, political activist
1940-2018 Riffat Hassan Pakistan 1943 theologian, scholar of the Qur'an [61]
1940-2018 Hissa Hilal Saudi Arabia poet [62]
1940-2018 Lubna al-Hussein Sudan journalist, human rights activist [63]
1940-2018 Samira Ibrahim Egypt 1987 activist [64]
1940-2018 Ramziya al-Iryani Yemen 1954 novelist, diplomat [65][66]
1940-2018 Na'eem Jeenah South Africa 1965 academic [67]
1940-2018 Mohja Kahf Syria 1967
1940-2018 Meena Keshwar Kamal Afghanistan 1956 1987 women's rights activist, founder of Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan [68][69][70][71]
1940-2018 Sultana Kamal Bangladesh 1950 activist [72][73]
1940-2018 Sadiq Khan United Kingdom 1970 Mayor of London since 2016 [74]
1940-2018 Noushin Ahmadi Khorasani Iran 20th century
1940-2018 Fawzia Koofi Afghanistan 1975 or 1976 politician, women' rights activist [75]
1940-2018 Elaheh Koulaei Iran 1956
1940-2018 Konca Kuriş Turkey 1961 1999 writer [76]
1940-2018 Asma Lamrabet Morocco [77]
1940-2018 Mukhtār Mā'ī Pakistan 1972 advocate for women's rights [78]
1940-2018 Irshad Manji Canada 1968 [79]
1940-2018 Farideh Mashini Iran 2012 women's rights activist [80]
1940-2018 Fatima Mernissi Morocco 1940 [81]
1940-2018 Ziba Mir-Hosseini Iran 1952 academic of Islamic law and gender [82][83]
1940-2018 Fakhrossadat Mohtashamipour Iran reformist activist, head of women's affairs at the Ministry of Interior [84]
1940-2018 Ilham Moussaïd France 1989 politician [85][86]
1940-2018 Shirin Neshat Iran 1957 visual artist [87][88]
1940-2018 Asra Nomani India 1965 [89]
1940-2018 Queen Noor of Jordan Jordan 1951 queen consort of Jordan
1940-2018 Ayaz Latif Palijo Pakistan 1968 politician
1940-2018 Zahra Rahnavard Iran 1945 academic, politician [90]
1940-2018 Queen Rania of Jordan Jordan 1970 queen consort of Jordan
1940-2018 Raheel Raza Pakistan 1949 journalist, activist [91][92]
1940-2018 Nilofar Sakhi Afghanistan 20th century human rights activist [93]
1940-2018 Zainab Salbi Iraq 1969 humanitarian, CEO of Women for Women International [94][95]
1940-2018 Linda Sarsour United States 1980 political activist [96]
1940-2018 Marjane Satrapi France, Iran 1969 [97]
1940-2018 Shamima Shaikh South Africa 1960 1998 South African activist, member of the Muslim Youth Movement of South Africa, proponent of Islamic gender equality [98]
1940-2018 Shahla Sherkat Iran 1956 journalist
1940-2018 Nasrin Sotoudeh Iran 1963 human rights lawyer [99]
1940-2018 Hidayet Şefkatli Tuksal Turkey 1963 human rights activist [100]
1940-2018 Zil-e-Huma Usman Pakistan 1971 politician, women's rights activist [101]
1940-2018 Amina Wadud United States 1952 [102]
1940-2018 Rama Yade France 1976 politician, writer [103]
1940-2018 Nadia Yassine Morocco 1958 [104]
1940-2018 Malala Yousafzai Pakistan 1997 - Pakistani activist for female education [105]
1940-2018 Bilkisu Yusuf Nigeria 1952 2015 journalist, NGO adviser [106]
1940-2018 Kadra Yusuf Norway 1980 activist [107]
1940-2018 Musdah Mulia Indonesia 1960 human rights activist, Islamic scholar, theologian, proponent of Islamic gender equality and LGBTIQ, interfaith activist, one of founders and leaders of ICRP - Indonesian Conference on Religion and Peace [108]

Islamic feminist movements[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]