List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career 3-point scoring leaders

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Travis Bader (No. 3) of Oakland University holds the Division I record.

A three-point field goal (also known as a "three-pointer" or "3-pointer") is a field goal in a basketball game, made from beyond the three-point line, a designated arc radiating from the basket. A successful attempt is worth three points, in contrast to the two points awarded for shots made inside the three-point line. The members on this list are the top 25 in 3-point field goals made in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I competition. The statistic was first recognized in the 1986–87 season when 3-point field goals were officially instituted by the NCAA.[1] From the 1986–87 season through the 2007–08 season, the three-point perimeter was marked at 19 ft 9 in (6.02 m) for both men's and women's college basketball.[2] On May 3, 2007, the NCAA men's basketball rules committee passed a measure to extend the distance of the men's three-point line back to 20 ft 9 in (6.32 m), while the women's line would remain the same.[2]

The all-time leader in three-point field goals made is Travis Bader of Oakland. He made 504 threes in 1,246 attempts (40.5%) in his four-year career. The career record for three-point attempts is also held by Bader. Only one player in the top 25 all-time earned his way onto this list in only three seasons: Stephen Curry of Davidson played from 2006–07 through 2008–09 but left for the National Basketball Association (NBA) after his junior season. Curry also played in the fewest games (104) out of all of the other players in the top 25 and currently ranks seventh all-time.

Four players split their collegiate careers at two schools apiece: Keith Veney, who made 409 threes, first played at Lamar before transferring to Marshall; Akeem Richmond, who made 416, started at Rhode Island before transferring to East Carolina; Rotnei Clarke, who made 389, played three seasons at Arkansas before transferring to Butler for his final season; and Robert Vaden, who made 379, started at Indiana before transferring to UAB. The player with the highest three-point percentage for his career on this list is Mark Alberts of Akron (43.9%), while Joe Zeglinski of Hartford has the lowest (34.5%). Only one school (UMKC) has two different players represented in this list.

Key[edit]

3-point field goal leaders[edit]

J. J. Redick made 457 three-pointers, second all-time in Division I.
Stephen Curry finished with 414 in three seasons.
Player Pos. Team Games
played
Career start Career end 3PM 3PA 3P% Ref.
Bader, TravisTravis Bader G Oakland 137 2010 2014 504 1246 40.5 [3]
Redick, J. J.J. J. Redick G Duke 139 2002 2006 457 1126 40.6 [4]
Holston, DavidDavid Holston G Chicago State 119 2005 2009 450 1147 39.2 [5]
Clark, KeydrenKeydren Clark G Saint Peter's 118 2002 2006 435 1192 36.5 [6]
Lynn, DamonDamon Lynn G NJIT 118 2013 2017 434 1225 35.4 [7]
Foster, KevinKevin Foster G Santa Clara 133 2008 2013 431 1184 36.4 [8]
Lofton, ChrisChris Lofton G Tennessee 128 2004 2008 431 1021 42.2 [9]
Richmond, AkeemAkeem Richmond G Rhode Island / East Carolina 139 2009 2014 416 1082 38.4 [10]
Curry, StephenStephen Curry G Davidson 104 2006 2009 414 1004 41.2 [11]
Staples, CurtisCurtis Staples G Virginia 122 1994 1998 413 1079 38.2 [12]
Leasure, JackJack Leasure G Coastal Carolina 117 2004 2008 411 1009 40.7 [13]
Veney, KeithKeith Veney G Lamar / Marshall 111 1993 1997 409 1014 40.3 [14][15]
Day, DougDoug Day G Radford 117 1989 1993 401 1068 37.5 [16]
McNamara, GerryGerry McNamara G Syracuse 135 2002 2006 400 1131 35.4 [17]
Goudelock, AndrewAndrew Goudelock G Charleston 140 2007 2011 396 958 41.3 [18]
Zeglinski, JoeJoe Zeglinski G Hartford 135 2006 2011 393 1140 34.5 [19]
Watson, MichaelMichael Watson G UMKC 117 2000 2004 391 1098 35.6 [20]
Clarke, RotneiRotnei Clarke G Arkansas / Butler 125 2008 2013 389 935 41.6 [21]
Abrams, A. J.A. J. Abrams G Texas 144 2005 2009 389 976 39.9 [22]
Dunn, LaceDariusLaceDarius Dunn G Baylor 134 2007 2011 388 985 39.4 [23]
Vaden, RobertRobert Vaden G Indiana / UAB 127 2004 2009 379 993 38.2 [24]
Schmitz, RonnieRonnie Schmitz G UMKC (2) 112 1989 1993 378 948 39.9 [25]
Wittman, RyanRyan Wittman G Cornell 121 2006 2010 377 874 43.1 [26]
Alberts, MarkMark Alberts G Akron 107 1989 1993 375 853 43.9 [27]
Diebler, JonJon Diebler G Ohio State 144 2007 2011 374 900 41.5 [28]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "2009–10 NCAA Men's Basketball Records" (PDF). 2009–10 NCAA Men's Basketball Media Guide. National Collegiate Athletic Association. 2009. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Katz, Andy (May 3, 2007). "Committee extends men's 3-point line to 20-9". ESPN. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Travis Bader". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 8, 2014. 
  4. ^ "J. J. Redick". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  5. ^ "David Holston". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Keydren Clark". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Damon Lynn". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  8. ^ "Kevin Foster stats". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 23, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Chris Lofton". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Akeem Richmond". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 19, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Stephen Curry". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  12. ^ "1998 NBA Draft Prospect: Curtis Staples". SportsIllustrated.com. CNN. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  13. ^ "Jack Leasure". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Marshall basketball records" (PDF). 2009–10 Men's Basketball Media Guide. Marshall University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Lamar basketball records" (PDF). 2006–07 Men's Basketball Media Guide. Lamar University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  16. ^ "2009–10 Men's Basketball Media Guide" (Flash). RUHighlanders.com. Radford University. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Gerry McNamara". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Andrew Goudelock". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 4, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Joe Zeglinski". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved January 4, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Michael Watson". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  21. ^ "Rotnei Clarke player profile". ESPN. Retrieved March 24, 2013. 
  22. ^ "A. J. Abrams". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  23. ^ "LaceDarius Dunn". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  24. ^ "Robert Vaden". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  25. ^ "2008–09 Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). UMKCkangaroos.com. University of Missouri at Kansas City. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 4, 2012. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  26. ^ "Ryan Wittman". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 12, 2010. 
  27. ^ "2009–10 Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). Records and History. University of Akron. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  28. ^ "Jon Diebler stats". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved March 19, 2011.