List of NCAA Division I men's basketball champions

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A room with glass display cases containing rectangular, wooden trophies that are gold-plated.
The University of California, Los Angeles (trophy room pictured) has won the Men's Division I Basketball Championship a record 11 times.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men's Division I Basketball Championship, or NCAA Tournament, is a single-elimination tournament for men's college basketball teams in the United States. It determines the champion of Division I, the top level of play in the NCAA,[1] and the media often describes the winner as the national champion of college basketball.[2][3] The NCAA Tournament has been held annually since 1939, and its field grew from eight teams in the beginning to sixty-five teams by 2001; as of 2011, sixty-eight teams take part in the tournament.[4][5] Teams can gain invitations by winning a conference championship or receiving an at-large bid from a 10-person committee.[6] The semifinals of the tournament are known as the Final Four and are held in a different city each year, along with the championship game;[7] Indianapolis, the city where the NCAA is based, will host the Final Four every five years until 2040.[8] Each winning university receives a rectangular, gold-plated trophy made of wood.[9]

The first NCAA Tournament was organized by the National Association of Basketball Coaches.[10] Oregon won the inaugural tournament, defeating Ohio State 46–33 in the first championship game. Before the 1941 tournament, control of the event was given to the NCAA.[10] In the early years of the tournament, it was considered less important than the National Invitation Tournament (NIT), a New York City-based event.[11][12] Teams were able to compete in both events in the same year, and three of those that did so—Utah in 1944, Kentucky in 1949, and City College of New York (CCNY) in 1950—won the NCAA Tournament.[13] The 1949–50 CCNY team won both tournaments (defeating Bradley in both finals), and is the only college basketball team to accomplish this feat.[14] By the mid-1950s, the NCAA Tournament became the more prestigious of the two events,[15] and in 1971 the NCAA barred universities from playing in other tournaments, such as the NIT, if they were invited to the NCAA Tournament.[16]

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) has been the most successful college in the NCAA Tournament, winning 11 national titles. Ten of those championships came during a 12-year stretch from 1964 to 1975. UCLA also holds the record for the most consecutive championships, winning seven in a row from 1967 to 1973. Kentucky has the second-most titles, with eight. North Carolina is third with six championships, while Duke and Indiana follow with five each. Villanova is the most recent champion, having defeated Michigan in the final of the 2018 tournament. Among head coaches, John Wooden is the all-time leader with 10 championships; he coached UCLA during their period of success in the 1960s and 1970s. Duke's Mike Krzyzewski is second all-time with five titles.

Championship games[edit]

Legend for "Championship games" table below
Indicator Meaning
* Game was decided in an overtime period
dagger Game was decided in a third overtime period
Score Each score is linked to an article about that particular championship game, when available
Year Each year is linked to an article about that particular NCAA Tournament
Championship games, by year, showing winners and losers, final scores and venues
Year Winning team Winning head coach Score Losing team Losing head coach Venue City Ref.
1939 Oregon Howard Hobson 46–33 Ohio State Harold Olsen Patten Gymnasium Evanston, Illinois [17]
1940 Indiana Branch McCracken 60–42 Kansas Phog Allen Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [18]
1941 Wisconsin Bud Foster 39–34 Washington State Jack Friel Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [19]
1942 Stanford Everett Dean 53–38 Dartmouth O. B. Cowles Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [20]
1943 Wyoming Everett Shelton 46–34 Georgetown Elmer Ripley Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [21]
1944 Utah Vadal Peterson 42–40* Dartmouth Earl Brown Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [22][23]
1945 Oklahoma A&M Henry Iba 49–45 NYU Howard Cann Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [24]
1946 Oklahoma A&M Henry Iba 43–40 North Carolina Ben Carnevale Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [25]
1947 Holy Cross Doggie Julian 58–47 Oklahoma Bruce Drake Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [26]
1948 Kentucky Adolph Rupp 58–42 Baylor Bill Henderson Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [27]
1949 Kentucky Adolph Rupp 46–36 Oklahoma A&M Henry Iba Hec Edmundson Pavilion Seattle, Washington [28]
1950 CCNY Nat Holman 71–68 Bradley Forddy Anderson Madison Square Garden New York City, New York [29]
1951 Kentucky Adolph Rupp 68–58 Kansas State Jack Gardner Williams Arena Minneapolis, Minnesota [30]
1952 Kansas Phog Allen 80–63 St. John's Frank McGuire Hec Edmundson Pavilion Seattle, Washington [31]
1953 Indiana Branch McCracken 69–68 Kansas Phog Allen Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [32]
1954 La Salle Ken Loeffler 92–76 Bradley Forddy Anderson Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [33]
1955 San Francisco Phil Woolpert 77–63 La Salle Ken Loeffler Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [34]
1956 San Francisco Phil Woolpert 83–71 Iowa Bucky O'Connor McGaw Hall Evanston, Illinois [35]
1957 North Carolina Frank McGuire 54–53dagger Kansas Dick Harp Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [36]
1958 Kentucky Adolph Rupp 84–72 Seattle John Castellani Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky [37]
1959 California Pete Newell 71–70 West Virginia Fred Schaus Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky [38]
1960 Ohio State Fred Taylor 75–55 California Pete Newell Cow Palace Daly City, California [39][40]
1961 Cincinnati Ed Jucker 70–65* Ohio State Fred Taylor Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [41]
1962 Cincinnati Ed Jucker 71–59 Ohio State Fred Taylor Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky [42]
1963 Loyola Chicago George Ireland 60–58* Cincinnati Ed Jucker Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky [43]
1964 UCLA John Wooden 98–83 Duke Vic Bubas Municipal Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri [44]
1965 UCLA John Wooden 91–80 Michigan Dave Strack Memorial Coliseum Portland, Oregon [45]
1966 Texas Western Don Haskins 72–65 Kentucky Adolph Rupp Cole Field House College Park, Maryland [46]
1967 UCLA John Wooden 79–64 Dayton Don Donoher Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky [47]
1968 UCLA John Wooden 78–55 North Carolina Dean Smith Sports Arena Los Angeles, California [48]
1969 UCLA John Wooden 92–72 Purdue George King Freedom Hall Louisville, Kentucky [49]
1970 UCLA John Wooden 80–69 Jacksonville Joe Williams Cole Field House College Park, Maryland [50]
1971 UCLA John Wooden 68–62 Villanova[a] Jack Kraft Astrodome Houston, Texas [51]
1972 UCLA John Wooden 81–76 Florida State Hugh Durham Memorial Sports Arena Los Angeles, California [52]
1973 UCLA John Wooden 87–66 Memphis State Gene Bartow St. Louis Arena St. Louis, Missouri [53]
1974 North Carolina State Norm Sloan 76–64 Marquette Al McGuire Greensboro Coliseum Greensboro, North Carolina [54]
1975 UCLA John Wooden 92–85 Kentucky Joe B. Hall San Diego Sports Arena San Diego, California [55]
1976 Indiana Bob Knight 86–68 Michigan Johnny Orr Spectrum Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [56]
1977 Marquette Al McGuire 67–59 North Carolina Dean Smith Omni Coliseum Atlanta, Georgia [57]
1978 Kentucky Joe B. Hall 94–88 Duke Bill Foster The Checkerdome St. Louis, Missouri [58]
1979 Michigan State Jud Heathcote 75–64 Indiana State Bill Hodges Special Events Center Salt Lake City, Utah [59]
1980 Louisville Denny Crum 59–54 UCLA[a] Larry Brown Market Square Arena Indianapolis, Indiana [60]
1981 Indiana Bob Knight 63–50 North Carolina Dean Smith Spectrum Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [61]
1982 North Carolina Dean Smith 63–62 Georgetown John Thompson Louisiana Superdome New Orleans, Louisiana [62]
1983 North Carolina State Jim Valvano 54–52 Houston Guy Lewis University Arena Albuquerque, New Mexico [63]
1984 Georgetown John Thompson 84–75 Houston Guy Lewis Kingdome Seattle, Washington [64]
1985 Villanova Rollie Massimino 66–64 Georgetown John Thompson Rupp Arena Lexington, Kentucky [65]
1986 Louisville Denny Crum 72–69 Duke Mike Krzyzewski Reunion Arena Dallas, Texas [66]
1987 Indiana Bob Knight 74–73 Syracuse Jim Boeheim Louisiana Superdome New Orleans, Louisiana [67]
1988 Kansas Larry Brown 83–79 Oklahoma Billy Tubbs Kemper Arena Kansas City, Missouri [68]
1989 Michigan Steve Fisher 80–79* Seton Hall P. J. Carlesimo Kingdome Seattle, Washington [69]
1990 UNLV Jerry Tarkanian 103–73 Duke Mike Krzyzewski McNichols Sports Arena Denver, Colorado [70]
1991 Duke Mike Krzyzewski 72–65 Kansas Roy Williams Hoosier Dome Indianapolis, Indiana [71]
1992 Duke Mike Krzyzewski 71–51 Michigan[a] Steve Fisher Metrodome Minneapolis, Minnesota [72]
1993 North Carolina Dean Smith 77–71 Michigan[a] Steve Fisher Louisiana Superdome New Orleans, Louisiana [73]
1994 Arkansas Nolan Richardson 76–72 Duke Mike Krzyzewski Charlotte Coliseum Charlotte, North Carolina [74]
1995 UCLA Jim Harrick 89–78 Arkansas Nolan Richardson Kingdome Seattle, Washington [75]
1996 Kentucky Rick Pitino 76–67 Syracuse Jim Boeheim Continental Airlines Arena East Rutherford, New Jersey [76]
1997 Arizona Lute Olson 84–79* Kentucky Rick Pitino RCA Dome Indianapolis, Indiana [77]
1998 Kentucky Tubby Smith 78–69 Utah Rick Majerus Alamodome San Antonio, Texas [78]
1999 Connecticut Jim Calhoun 77–74 Duke Mike Krzyzewski Tropicana Field St. Petersburg, Florida [79]
2000 Michigan State Tom Izzo 89–76 Florida Billy Donovan RCA Dome Indianapolis, Indiana [80]
2001 Duke Mike Krzyzewski 82–72 Arizona Lute Olson Metrodome Minneapolis, Minnesota [81]
2002 Maryland Gary Williams 64–52 Indiana Mike Davis Georgia Dome Atlanta, Georgia [82]
2003 Syracuse Jim Boeheim 81–78 Kansas Roy Williams Louisiana Superdome New Orleans, Louisiana [83]
2004 Connecticut Jim Calhoun 82–73 Georgia Tech Paul Hewitt Alamodome San Antonio, Texas [84]
2005 North Carolina Roy Williams 75–70 Illinois Bruce Weber Edward Jones Dome St. Louis, Missouri [85]
2006 Florida Billy Donovan 73–57 UCLA Ben Howland RCA Dome Indianapolis, Indiana [86]
2007 Florida Billy Donovan 84–75 Ohio State Thad Matta Georgia Dome Atlanta, Georgia [87]
2008 Kansas Bill Self 75–68* Memphis[a] John Calipari Alamodome San Antonio, Texas [88]
2009 North Carolina Roy Williams 89–72 Michigan State Tom Izzo Ford Field Detroit, Michigan [89]
2010 Duke Mike Krzyzewski 61–59 Butler Brad Stevens Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis, Indiana [90]
2011 Connecticut Jim Calhoun 53–41 Butler Brad Stevens Reliant Stadium Houston, Texas [91]
2012 Kentucky John Calipari 67–59 Kansas Bill Self Mercedes-Benz Superdome New Orleans, Louisiana [92]
2013 Louisville[a] Rick Pitino 82–76 Michigan John Beilein Georgia Dome Atlanta, Georgia [93]
2014 Connecticut Kevin Ollie 60–54 Kentucky John Calipari AT&T Stadium Arlington, Texas [94]
2015 Duke Mike Krzyzewski 68–63 Wisconsin Bo Ryan Lucas Oil Stadium Indianapolis, Indiana [95]
2016 Villanova Jay Wright 77–74 North Carolina Roy Williams NRG Stadium Houston, Texas [96]
2017 North Carolina Roy Williams 71–65 Gonzaga Mark Few University of Phoenix Stadium Glendale, Arizona [97]
2018 Villanova Jay Wright 79–62 Michigan John Beilein Alamodome San Antonio, Texas [98]

Multiple champions[edit]

A map of the United States, with college basketball programs that have won the NCAA Division I men's basketball championship highlighted by the schools' location.
UCLA
UCLA
Kentucky
Kentucky
NorthCarolina
North
Carolina
Duke
Duke
Indiana
Indiana
Connecticut
Connecticut
Kansas
Kansas
Louisville
Louisville
San Francisco
San Francisco
Villanova
Villanova
Florida
Florida
NC State
NC State
Oklahoma State
Oklahoma State
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Michigan State
Michigan State
Arkansas
Arkansas
HolyCross
Holy
Cross
La Salle
La Salle
Loyola
Loyola
Marquette
Marquette
UTEP
UTEP
Arizona
Arizona
UNLV
UNLV
Stanford
Stanford
California
California
Georgetown
Georgetown
Maryland
Maryland
Ohio State
Ohio State
Utah
Utah
CCNY
CCNY
Wyoming
Wyoming
Michigan
Michigan
Syracuse
Syracuse
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Oregon
Oregon
Schools that have won the NCAA championship
Pink pog.svg – 11 championships, Purple pog.svg – 8 championships, Blue pog.svg – 6 championships, Red pog.svg – 5 championships
Green pog.svg – 4 championships , Yellow pog.svg – 3 championships, Black pog.svg – 2 championships, White pog.svg – 1 championship
Teams with multiple championships
Team Wins Years won
UCLA 11 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995
Kentucky 8 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1996, 1998, 2012
North Carolina 6 1957, 1982, 1993, 2005, 2009, 2017
Duke 5 1991, 1992, 2001, 2010, 2015
Indiana 5 1940, 1953, 1976, 1981, 1987
Connecticut 4 1999, 2004, 2011, 2014
Kansas 3 1952, 1988, 2008
Villanova 3 1985, 2016, 2018
Louisville 2 1980, 1986, 2013[c]
Michigan State 2 1979, 2000
Cincinnati 2 1961, 1962
Florida 2 2006, 2007
North Carolina State 2 1974, 1983
Oklahoma State[b] 2 1945, 1946
San Francisco 2 1955, 1956
Coaches with multiple championships
Coach Wins Years won
John Wooden 10 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975
Mike Krzyzewski 5 1991, 1992, 2001, 2010, 2015
Adolph Rupp 4 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958
Jim Calhoun 3 1999, 2004, 2011
Bob Knight 3 1976, 1981, 1987
Roy Williams 3 2005, 2009, 2017
Denny Crum 2 1980, 1986
Billy Donovan 2 2006, 2007
Henry Iba 2 1945, 1946
Ed Jucker 2 1961, 1962
Branch McCracken 2 1940, 1953
Dean Smith 2 1982, 1993
Phil Woolpert 2 1955, 1956
Jay Wright 2 2016, 2018

Champions by conference status[edit]

Champions by conference at the time of tournaments[edit]

Championships by conference membership at the time of tournaments
Conference Wins Years won Ref(s)
Pac-12 Conference (1915–current) 15 1939, 1942, 1959, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995, 1997 [17][38][99][100][101]
Atlantic Coast Conference (1953–current) 14 1957, 1974, 1982, 1983, 1991, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2015, 2017 [102][103][104][105][106]
Southeastern Conference (1932–current) 11 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2006, 2007, 2012 [107][108][109][110][111][112][113][114][115][116][117]
Big Ten Conference (1896–current) 10 1940, 1941, 1953, 1960, 1976, 1979, 1981, 1987, 1989, 2000 [118]
Big East Conference (1979–current) 8 1984, 1985, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2011, 2013,[c] 2016, 2018 [93][119][120][121][122]
Independents 6 1944, 1947, 1954, 1963, 1966, 1977 [46][123][124][125][126][127]
Missouri Valley Conference (1907–current) 4 1945, 1946, 1961, 1962 [128][129][130][131]
Big 8 Conference (1907–1996) 2 1952, 1988 [31][68]
Metro Conference (1975–1995) 2 1980, 1986 [132]
West Coast Conference (1952–current) 2 1955, 1956 [133]
American Athletic Conference (2014–current) 1 2014 [94]
Big 12 Conference (1994–current) 1 2008 [134]
Big West Conference (1969–current) 1 1990 [135]
Metropolitan New York Conference (1933–1963) 1 1950 [136]
Mountain States Conference (1938–1962) 1 1943 [137]

Championships by current conference membership[edit]

Championships by current conference membership
Conference Wins Years won Ref(s)
Atlantic Coast Conference 16 1957, 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1991, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013,[c] 2015, 2017 [138][139]
Pac-12 Conference 16 1939, 1942, 1944, 1959, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995, 1997 [140][141]
Southeastern Conference 11 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2006, 2007, 2012 [142]
Big Ten Conference 11 1940, 1941, 1953, 1960, 1976, 1979, 1981, 1987, 1989, 2000, 2002 [143]
American Athletic Conference 6 1961, 1962, 1999, 2004, 2011, 2014 [144][145][146]
Big 12 Conference 5 1945, 1946, 1952, 1988, 2008 [147][148][149]
Big East Conference 5 1977, 1984, 1985, 2016, 2018 [122][150][151]
Mountain West Conference 2 1943, 1990 [152][153]
West Coast Conference 2 1955, 1956 [154]
Atlantic 10 Conference 1 1954 [155]
City University of New York Athletic Conference 1 1950 [156]
Conference USA 1 1966 [157]
Missouri Valley Conference 1 1963 [158]
Patriot League 1 1947 [159]

Championships by state[edit]

Championships by state
State Wins Years won
California 15 1942, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995
North Carolina 13 1957, 1974, 1982, 1983, 1991, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2015, 2017
Kentucky 10 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1980, 1986, 1996, 1998, 2012, 2013[c]
Indiana 5 1940, 1953, 1976, 1981, 1987
Connecticut 4 1999, 2004, 2011, 2014
Pennsylvania 4 1954, 1985, 2016, 2018
Ohio 3 1960, 1961, 1962
Kansas 3 1952, 1988, 2008
Michigan 3 1979, 1989, 2000
Oklahoma 2 1945, 1946
Wisconsin 2 1941, 1977
New York 2 1950, 2003
Florida 2 2006, 2007
Oregon 1 1939
Wyoming 1 1943
Utah 1 1944
Massachusetts 1 1947
Illinois 1 1963
Texas 1 1966
Washington, D.C. 1 1984
Nevada 1 1990
Arkansas 1 1994
Arizona 1 1997
Maryland 1 2002
  • Indicates vacated by NCAA

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

General

Specific

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