List of Naga tribes

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Naga is a vaguely defined umbrella term for several tribes in North-East India and Upper Burma.

S. R. Tohring (2010) lists 66 Naga tribes.[1] The 1991 Census of India listed 35 Naga groups as Scheduled Tribes: 17 in Nagaland, 15 in Manipur and 3 in Arunachal Pradesh.[2]

In the past, writers such as Dr. Rev Dozo (in The Cross over Nagaland) and Renthy Keitzar, have classified the Kuki as one of the Naga tribes.

Naga tribes[edit]

SN Tribe Traditional territory Recognized as Scheduled Tribe in Reference for classification as Naga Population[3] Comments
1 Angami India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 132,000
2 Ao India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 261,000
3 Chang India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 62,4000
4 Chirr India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 ?
5 Chiru India Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 ?
6 Htangan Burma S. R. Tohring, 2010 ?
7 Kharam (also Purum) India Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 1,400
8 Khiamniungan (or Khiamnungam) Burma, India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 37,800 Nokaw (Noko) founded in Burma is also a Khiamniungan tribe.
Konyak Burma, India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 248,000
10 Leinong (also Lainong or Lainung) Burma S. R. Tohring, 2010 7,000
11 Liangmai (also Liangmai or Lingmai) India (Tamenglong, Manipur) Manipur, Assam (under Community Zeliangrong) S. R. Tohring, 2010 34,200 Also known as Koireng (or Quireng) — not to be confused with the Koireng Kukis
12 Lotha India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 170,000
13 Makury (sometimes spelt Makuri) Burma Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 2,500
14 Mao (also Ememei) Senapati district, Manipur and Kohima and Dimapur districts, Nagaland (India) Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 81,000 Also called Shiipfomei together with Poumai[4]
15 Maram Senapati district (India) Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 37,3000
16 Maring Chandel district (India) Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 22,300
17 Mzieme Nagaland William Frawley, 2003[5] 29,000
18 Nokaw (or Noko) Burma S. R. Tohring, 2010 ? Now they are known as Khiamniungan tribe.
19 Nocte (or Nokte) India Patkai hills of Tirap district, Arunachal Pradesh. S. R. Tohring, 2010 33,000 It is a sub-tribe of Tangshang Naga.
20 Para Burma S. R. Tohring, 2010 ?
21 Pochury India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 16,700
22 Phom India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 123,000
23 Poumai Senapati District, Manipur and Phek district, Nagaland (India) S. R. Tohring, 2010 1,50,000
24 Puimei (Inpui or kabui) India (Manipur and Assam) William Frawley, 2003[5] 3,000 Not to be confused with Poumai
25 Rengma India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 North-13000, South-21000
26 Rongmei India Assam, Manipur and Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 90,372 Rongmei are part of Major Community called as Zeliangrong
27 Sangtam India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 84,300
28 Sumi (or Sema) India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 104,000
29 Tangkhul Ukhrul district (India), Burma Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 India-142,000, Myanmar-4,000
30 Tangshang (or Tase in language coding name) India, Burma Arunachal Pradesh, Burma S. R. Tohring, 2010 ? Formerly known as Pangmi and Heimi (Haimi in Burma; and Rangpang, Tangsa, Wancho, Nocte, Tutsa in India.
31 Tarao India S. R. Tohring, 2010 870
32 Thangal India (Mao and Sadar Hills, Manipur) S. R. Tohring, 2010 23,600
33 Tikhir India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 ?
34 Tutsa India Robin Tribhuwan, 2005[6] 25,5000 It is a sub-tribe of Tangshang Naga.
35 Wancho India Arunachal Pradesh S. R. Tohring, 2010 49,100 It is a sub-tribe of Tangshang Naga.
36 Yimchunger Burma, India Nagaland S. R. Tohring, 2010 92,100
37 Zeme India: Tamenglong, Senapati districts (Manipur); Peren district (Nagaland); NC Hills district (Assam) Zeliang in Nagaland, Zeme in Assam & Manipur S.R.Tohring 34,100 Zeme is a part of Zeliangrong Community

Tribes sometimes classified as Naga[edit]

Tribe Traditional territory Recognized as Scheduled Tribe in Reference for classification as Naga Population Comments
Anal Chandel district (India), Burma Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 Also classified as Kuki[7]
Chothe India Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 Also classified as Kuki-Chin[7]
Inpui India S. R. Tohring, 2010
Khoibu India Manipur Romesh Singh, 2006[8] Recognized as a sub-tribe of Maring by some; however, they have a different origin and dialect
Lamkang (also Lamgang or Langang) Tengnoupal district (India) Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010
Monsang Tengnoupal district (India) Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 Not to confused with the sub-tribe of Tangshang Naga called, 'Moshang or Mossang'
Moyon Tengnoupal district (India), Burma Manipur S. R. Tohring, 2010 Linguistically, the Moyons are closer to the Chin-Kuki-Mizo tribes, and have been classified as an "Old Kuki" tribe in the anthropological literature. However, now, they prefer to place themselves within the Naga fold.[9][10][11]

Composite tribes or communities[edit]

  • Chakhesang: Chakru, Kheza and Sangtam combined[4]
  • Kabui: Rongmei and Inpui together[4]
  • Shepfomei or Shepoumai (Mao-Poumai): Ememei, Lepaona, Chiliivai and Paomata together[4]
  • Zeliangrong: Zeme, Liangmai and Rongmei together[7]
  • Zeliang: Zeme and Liangmei together are called Zeliang in Nagaland[2]
  • Tangshang: A combination term, Tang from Tangnyu Vang (Wang) and Shang from Shangnyu Vang (Wang) chieftains, which were formerly known as and includes Heimi (Haimi), Pangmi, Rangpang, Tangsa, Wancho, Nocte, and Tutsa now.

References[edit]

  1. ^ S. R. Tohring (2010). Violence and identity in North-east India: Naga-Kuki conflict. Mittal Publications. pp. xv–xvii. ISBN 978-81-8324-344-5. 
  2. ^ a b U. A. Shimray (2007). Naga population and integration movement. Mittal Publications. pp. 25–33. ISBN 978-81-8324-181-6. 
  3. ^ http://www.ethnologue.com/
  4. ^ a b c d William Nepuni (2010). Socio-cultural history of Shüpfomei Naga tribe. Mittal Publications. pp. 24–25. ISBN 978-81-8324-307-0. 
  5. ^ a b William Frawley (1 May 2003). International Encyclopedia of Linguistics. Oxford University Press. pp. 1–. ISBN 978-0-19-513977-8. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  6. ^ Robin D. Tribhuwan (1 January 2005). Tribal Housing Issues. Discovery Publishing House. pp. 56–. ISBN 978-81-7141-917-3. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c G. K. Ghosh, Shukla Ghosh (1997). Women of Manipur (illustrated ed.). APH Publishing. p. 4. ISBN 978-81-7024-897-2. 
  8. ^ M. Romesh Singh (1 January 2006). Tribal Development in 21st Century: An Experience from Manipur. Mittal Publications. pp. 60–. ISBN 978-81-8324-150-2. Retrieved 8 September 2013. 
  9. ^ Sipra Sen (1992). Tribes and Castes of Manipur: Description and Select Bibliography. Mittal Publications. p. 58. ISBN 978-81-7099-310-0. 
  10. ^ Folk tales of Moyon-Monsang. Directorate for Development of Tribals and Backward Classes, Manipur. 1982. p. 1. 
  11. ^ G. K. Ghosh, Shukla Ghosh (1997). Women of Manipur. APH. p. 54. ISBN 9788170248972.