List of National Historic Sites of Canada in Saskatchewan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of National Historic Sites (French: Lieux historiques nationaux du Canada) in the province of Saskatchewan. There are 47 National Historic Sites designated in Saskatchewan, 10 of which are administered by Parks Canada (identified below by the beaver icon Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png).[1][2]

There are related federal designations for National Historic Events and National Historic Persons. Events, Sites, and Persons are each typically marked by a federal plaque, but the markers do not indicate which designation a subject has been given. The Rideau Canal is a Site, while the Welland Canal is an Event. The cairn and plaque to John Macdonell does not refer to a National Historic Person, but is erected because his home, Glengarry House, is a National Historic Site.[3][4] Similarly, the plaque to John Guy officially marks not a Person, but an Event—the Landing of John Guy.[5]

This list uses names designated by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada, which may differ from other names for these sites.

National Historic Sites[edit]

Site[1] Date(s) Designated Location Description Image
Addison Sod House [6] 1911 (completed) 2003 Kindersley
51°28′0″N 109°10′0″W / 51.46667°N 109.16667°W / 51.46667; -109.16667 (Addison Sod House)
A well-preserved and rare surviving example of a sod building, which was an important prairie form of construction and used extensively in the tall-grass regions
Batoche Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[7] 1872 (establishment) 1923 Batoche
52°45′14.81″N 106°6′42.3″W / 52.7541139°N 106.111750°W / 52.7541139; -106.111750 (Batoche)
A Métis community and the site of 1885 Battle of Batoche; commemorates both the North-West Rebellion and Métis river lot land use patterns 1885 photograph of the commencement of hostilities at the Battle of Batoche
Battle of Cut Knife Hill [8] 1885 (battle) 1923 Cut Knife
52°50′22″N 108°57′47″W / 52.83944°N 108.96306°W / 52.83944; -108.96306 (Battle of Cut Knife Hill)
Site where an attack during the North-West Rebellion by 300 government troops was repulsed by members of the Poundmaker Cree Nation, led by Pitikwahanapiwiyin Circa 1885 lithograph of a birds-eye view of the Battle of Cut Knife Hill
Battle of Duck Lake [9] 1885 (battle) 1924 Duck Lake
52°49′27″N 106°16′27″W / 52.82417°N 106.27417°W / 52.82417; -106.27417 (Battle of Duck Lake)
A 12-hectare (30-acre) grassy lot that served as the site of the first battle of the North-West Rebellion, considered an important victory for the Métis
Battle of Tourond's Coulee / Fish Creek Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[10] 1885 (battle) 1923 Fish Creek
52°32′25.9″N 106°8′57.18″W / 52.540528°N 106.1492167°W / 52.540528; -106.1492167 (Battle of Tourond's Coulee / Fish Creek)
The 36-hectare (89-acre) site of a battle between Middleton’s North West Field Force and Gabriel Dumont’s Métis and First Nations forces; a psychological victory for the Métis during the North-West Rebellion  Hillcrest above Fish Creek Ravine
Battleford Court House [11] 1909 (completed) 1981 Battleford
52°44′0″N 108°19′0″W / 52.73333°N 108.31667°W / 52.73333; -108.31667 (Battleford Court House)
A three-storey square brick and limestone court house; representative of the public buildings erected by the provincial government following the creation of the Province of Saskatchewan in 1905 Exterior view of the Battleford Court House
Biggar Railway Station (Grand Trunk Pacific) [12] 1910 (completed) 1976 Biggar
52°3′13″N 107°59′11″W / 52.05361°N 107.98639°W / 52.05361; -107.98639 (Biggar Railway Station (Grand Trunk Pacific))
A one-and-a-half-storey, timber-frame train station that commemorates the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway's role in the development of Western Canada and the distinctive contribution its stations made to Canada’s architectural heritage Exterior view of the Biggar Railway Station
Canadian Bank of Commerce [13] 1907 (completed) 1976 Watson
52°7′44″N 104°31′27″W / 52.12889°N 104.52417°W / 52.12889; -104.52417 (Canadian Bank of Commerce)
A two-storey, wood-frame bank with neoclassical stylings, now housing the local museum; the largest surviving example of the prefabricated banks erected in railway towns across the prairies, and representative of the expansion of the country's large banks into Western Canada Exterior view of the Bank of Commerce building in Watson
Carlton House [14] 1810 (established) 1976 Duck Lake
52°49′4.95″N 106°29′47.35″W / 52.8180417°N 106.4964861°W / 52.8180417; -106.4964861 (Carlton House)
The site of forts built in 1810, 1845 and 1855 (with foundations and archaeological remains existing from the 1855 fort); served as a strategically placed Hudson’s Bay Company fort and a North West Mounted Police post, and the location where Treaty 6 was signed Fortifications of Carlton House
Claybank Brick Plant [15] 1912 (established) 1994 Claybank
50°3′0″N 105°14′0″W / 50.05000°N 105.23333°W / 50.05000; -105.23333 (Claybank Brick Plant)
A former industrial complex used for the manufacture of clay bricks from 1914 to 1989; key structures and brick-making equipment of the 1912-1937 period remain remarkably intact
College Building [16] 1912 (original building completed) 2001 Saskatoon
52°8′12″N 106°37′51″W / 52.13667°N 106.63083°W / 52.13667; -106.63083 (College Building)
The centrepiece of the best grouping of Collegiate Gothic university buildings in Canada, surrounding a grassy oval known as "The Bowl"; the earliest and most important building on the University of Saskatchewan campus Front facade of the College Building
Cumberland House [17] 1774 (established) 1924 Cumberland House
53°57′35″N 102°15′53″W / 53.95972°N 102.26472°W / 53.95972; -102.26472 (Cumberland House)
The Hudson’s Bay Company's first inland fur-trading post, around which Saskatchewan’s oldest permanent settlement was founded by Samuel Hearne; only visible remnant today is a stone-walled 1890s gunpowder house
Cypress Hills Massacre Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[18] 1873 (massacre) 1964 Maple Creek
49°33′1.75″N 109°53′19.76″W / 49.5504861°N 109.8888222°W / 49.5504861; -109.8888222 (Cypress Hills Massacre)
The site where American traders attacked a Nakoda camp and killed a number of inhabitants; one of the first major tests of Canada's law enforcement policies in Western Canada Distant view of the valley in which the Cypress Hills Massacre occurred
Doukhobor Dugout House [19] 1899 (completed) 2008 Blaine Lake
52°45′17″N 106°43′28″W / 52.75472°N 106.72444°W / 52.75472; -106.72444 (Doukhobor Dugout House)
One of many such dugout houses constructed by Doukhobors upon arrival in Canada, and a shelter type used by many settlers of various ethnicities upon their arrival on the prairies; the only known partially surviving example of this type of shelter
Doukhobors at Veregin [20] 1905 (established) 2006 Veregin
51°35′0″N 102°4′53″W / 51.58333°N 102.08139°W / 51.58333; -102.08139 (Doukhobors at Veregin)
The administrative, distribution and spiritual centre for the Doukhobor settlements in the region, the focus of which is a large prayer house Exterior view of the Veregin Prayer House
Esterhazy Flour Mill [21] 1907 (completed) 2009 Esterhazy
50°39′11″N 102°4′16″W / 50.65306°N 102.07111°W / 50.65306; -102.07111 (Esterhazy Flour Mill)
A rare and complete flour milling complex, of the type that was crucial to the grain industry in Saskatchewan and which contributed to the development of farming communities such as Esterhazy Exterior view of the flour mill in winter
Forestry Farm Park and Zoo [22] 1913 (established) 1990 Saskatoon
52°9′30″N 106°35′3″W / 52.15833°N 106.58417°W / 52.15833; -106.58417 (Forestry Farm Park and Zoo)
Opened as a tree nursery station and model farm under the federal Department of the Interior in order to develop new and scientific farming methods; now a municipal zoo Superintendent's residence at the Forestry Farm Park and Zoo
Former Prince Albert City Hall [23] 1893 (completed) 1984 Prince Albert
53°12′7″N 105°45′31″W / 53.20194°N 105.75861°W / 53.20194; -105.75861 (Former Prince Albert City Hall)
Former city hall with bell tower, now serving as an arts centre; one of the few remaining 19th-century town halls on the Canadian Prairies, and a reflection of the town's status and optimism at the time of the hall's construction Former Prince Albert ,Saskatchewan city hall.
Fort à la Corne [24] 1753 (established) 1926 Kinistino
53°9′0″N 104°48′0″W / 53.15000°N 104.80000°W / 53.15000; -104.80000 (Fort à la Corne)
Site near where Louis de la Corne built Fort St. Louis in 1753, the furthest western point of New France; subsequently the site of several fur trade posts, including a post established in 1846 by the Hudson's Bay Company and named after Corne
Fort Battleford Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[25] 1876 (established) 1923 Battleford
52°43′36.58″N 108°17′42.32″W / 52.7268278°N 108.2950889°W / 52.7268278; -108.2950889 (Fort Battleford)
An early North West Mounted Police post, representative of the role of the police force in the 1876 to 1885 period and specifically of the role played by the force during the North-West Rebellion Fort Battleford as seen from a distance
Fort Espérance Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[26] 1785 (established) 1944 Rocanville
50°29′32″N 101°34′39″W / 50.49222°N 101.57750°W / 50.49222; -101.57750 (Fort Espérance)
An archaeological site believed to contain the remains of two late 18th- and early 19th-century fur trade forts; the earliest and most permanent of the North West Company’s posts related to the Assiniboine River fur trade
Fort Livingstone Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[27] 1874 (established) 1923 Pelly
51°53′58″N 101°57′44″W / 51.899444°N 101.962222°W / 51.899444; -101.962222 (Fort Livingstone)
An archaeological site at the location of the former capital of the Northwest Territories (1876-1877) and which once housed the first North West Mounted Police barracks in Western Canada 1877 sketch of Fort Livingstone
Fort Pelly Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[28] 1856 (established) 1953 Pelly
51°46′35″N 101°59′51″W / 51.77639°N 101.99750°W / 51.77639; -101.99750 (Fort Pelly)
An archaeological site on the site of the Hudson’s Bay Company fur trade post located at the elbow of the Assiniboine River near the Swan River; the headquarters of the company's Swan River District for almost 50 years
Fort Pitt [29] 1829 (established) 1954 Fort Pitt Provincial Park
53°39′1″N 109°45′6″W / 53.65028°N 109.75167°W / 53.65028; -109.75167 (Fort Pitt)
An archaeological site containing the remains of two Hudson's Bay Company forts; the second fort was burned during the North-West Rebellion by Big Bear’s followers after the North West Mounted Police had withdrawn to Battleford
Fort Qu'Appelle [30] 1864 (established) 1953 Fort Qu'Appelle
50°46′18″N 103°47′51″W / 50.77167°N 103.79750°W / 50.77167; -103.79750 (Fort Qu'Appelle)
Originally a major Hudson's Bay Company provision post for the southern Prairies surrounded by a log palisade; now located at the town’s northern edge, with one remaining one original building that serves as a museum Circa 1914 postcard of the one remaining fort building, now the museum
Fort Walsh Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[31] 1875 (established) 1924 Merryflat
49°34′21.89″N 109°52′53.24″W / 49.5727472°N 109.8814556°W / 49.5727472; -109.8814556 (Fort Walsh)
A fort which served as headquarters of the North West Mounted Police from 1878 to 1882 1878 photograph of NWMP members at Fort Walsh
Frenchman Butte Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[32] 1885 (battle) 1929 Frenchman Butte
53°37′38″N 109°34′33″W / 53.62722°N 109.57583°W / 53.62722; -109.57583 (Frenchman Butte)
The site where the Wood Cree and the Alberta Field Force waged the Battle of Frenchman's Butte on May 28, 1885 as part of the North-West Rebellion
Government House [33] 1891 (completed) 1968 Regina
50°27′14″N 104°38′52″W / 50.45389°N 104.64778°W / 50.45389; -104.64778 (Government House)
The former residence of the Lieutenant Governor of the Northwest Territories and now an event venue, museum and offices for the Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan; one of the few surviving territorial government buildings Government House
Gravelbourg Ecclesiastical Buildings [34] 1919 (Cathedral completed) 1995 Gravelbourg
49°52′20″N 106°33′26″W / 49.87222°N 106.55722°W / 49.87222; -106.55722 (Gravelbourg Ecclesiastical Buildings)
A Cathedral, Bishop’s residence and convent; symbolic of the efforts of the Roman Catholic Church in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to colonize Western Canada with French Canadians
Gray Burial Site [35] 3000 BCE (c.) 1973 Swift Current
50°20′38″N 107°52′43″W / 50.34389°N 107.87861°W / 50.34389; -107.87861 (Gray Burial Site)
One of oldest burial sites on the Prairies
Holy Trinity Church [36] 1860 (completed) 1970 Stanley Mission
55°25′3″N 104°33′2″W / 55.41750°N 104.55056°W / 55.41750; -104.55056 (Holy Trinity Church)
A large, wooden church on a rocky point on the banks of the Churchill River, the spire of which can be seen for a great distance against the forest backdrop; the oldest existing building in Saskatchewan, and the oldest church west of the Red River Front facade with spire of Holy Trinity
Humboldt Post Office [37] 1912 (completed) 1977 Humboldt
52°11′56″N 105°7′22″W / 52.19889°N 105.12278°W / 52.19889; -105.12278 (Humboldt Post Office)
A Romanesque Revival-style former post office which remains, more than a century after construction, one of the dominant buildings on Main Street and a landmark in the town; representative of the extension of federal services across the west in the early 20th century Exterior view of the Humboldt Post Office
Île-à-la-Crosse [38] 1775 (trading post established) 1954 Île-à-la-Crosse
55°27′0″N 107°53′0″W / 55.45000°N 107.88333°W / 55.45000; -107.88333 (Île-à-la-Crosse)
A pre-contact gathering place for Aboriginal peoples, where Louis Primeau established a trading post in 1775; the site served as an important provision depot for the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company established its first post here in 1799
Keyhole Castle [39] 1913 (completed) 1975 Prince Albert
53°11′43″N 105°45′6″W / 53.19528°N 105.75167°W / 53.19528; -105.75167 (Keyhole Castle)
A two-and-a-half storey mansion in the Queen Anne Revival-style, the name of which derives from the shape of the windows in its corner tower; exemplifies the eclecticism and individualism in late 19th and early 20th-century architecture, and represents the optimism of the early citizens of this community
Last Mountain Lake Bird Sanctuary[fr] [40] 1887 (established) 1987 Last Mountain Valley
51°19′52.52″N 105°14′2.72″W / 51.3312556°N 105.2340889°W / 51.3312556; -105.2340889 (Last Mountain Lake Bird Sanctuary)
On the recommendation of Edgar Dewdney, Lieutenant-Governor of the North-West Territories, this sanctuary located at the northern end of Last Mountain Lake was set aside in 1887 for the protection of wildfowl, the first such reserve on the continent
Marr Residence[41] 1884 2016 Saskatoon
52°07′07″N 106°39′48″W / 52.118640°N 106.663290°W / 52.118640; -106.663290 (Marr Residence)
Part of the area's first European settlement and a temperance colonization effort; field hospital during the North-West Rebellion
Melville Railway Station[42] 1908 2016 Melville
50°55′35″N 102°48′26″W / 50.9263°N 102.8072°W / 50.9263; -102.8072 (Melville Railway Station)
Major Grand Trunk Pacific Railway station helped settle and develop the West
Montgomery Place[43] 1945 2016 Saskatoon
52°06′43″N 106°43′41″W / 52.112001°N 106.727965°W / 52.112001; -106.727965 (Montgomery Place)
A post-World War II veterans community which became a commemorative landscape and historic district
Moose Jaw Court House [44] 1909 (completed) 1981 Moose Jaw
50°23′37″N 105°32′14″W / 50.39361°N 105.53722°W / 50.39361; -105.53722 (Moose Jaw Court House)
A brick court house with Beaux-Arts design, Neoclassical detailing and Bedford stone trim; symbolic of the new provincial justice system of Saskatchewan of 1908, and the only court house in the province designed by Pearson and Darling
Motherwell Homestead Beaver 1 (PSF)(retouched)(transparent).png[45] 1882 (established) 1966 Abernethy
50°43′8″N 103°25′30″W / 50.71889°N 103.42500°W / 50.71889; -103.42500 (Motherwell Homestead)
A 3.59-hectare (8.9-acre) farmstead with a two-storey, stone farmhouse; noted for its associations with William Richard Motherwell and illustrative of a prairie homestead from the Western Canada settlement period
Next of Kin Memorial Avenue [46] 1923 (completed) 1992 Saskatoon
52°8′49″N 106°39′29″W / 52.14694°N 106.65806°W / 52.14694; -106.65806 (Next of Kin Memorial Avenue)
A 0.7-kilometre (0.43 mi)-long lane beginning at a pair of stone pedestals, flanked on either side by a single row of mature elm trees and commemorative bronze plaques, and ending in a paved circle surrounding a stone memorial cairn; an excellent example of the "Roads of Remembrance" phenomenon which developed to honour the dead of the First World War View looking down tree-lined Next of Kin Memorial Avenue
Old Government House / Saint-Charles Scholasticate [47] 1879 (completed) 1973 Battleford
52°42′43″N 108°18′29″W / 52.71194°N 108.30806°W / 52.71194; -108.30806 (Old Government House / Saint-Charles Scholasticate)
The site of the first Government House of the (then) Northwest Territories; the house was destroyed by fire in 2003 1870s photo of old government house
Saskatchewan Legislative Building and Grounds [48] 1912 (completed) 2005 Regina
50°25′57″N 104°36′54″W / 50.43250°N 104.61500°W / 50.43250; -104.61500 (Saskatchewan Legislative Building and Grounds)
A buff-coloured limestone legislative building on the shores of Lake Wascana which, along with its grounds, represents one of the best examples of Beaux-Arts and City Beautiful design in Canada; a highly visible symbol of the province, and one which represents the ambition and drive of the people of Saskatchewan The front entrance and dome of the Saskatchewan Legislative Building
Saskatoon Railway Station (Canadian Pacific) [49] 1908 (completed) 1976 Saskatoon
52°7′56″N 106°40′16″W / 52.13222°N 106.67111°W / 52.13222; -106.67111 (Saskatoon Railway Station (Canadian Pacific))
A two-storey, Château-style railway station; commemorates the Canadian Pacific Railway and the smaller stations built by the line during its prosperous years Exterior view of the Saskatoon railway station in winter
Seager Wheeler's Maple Grove Farm [50] 1898 (established) 1994 Rosthern
52°40′25″N 106°13′5″W / 52.67361°N 106.21806°W / 52.67361; -106.21806 (Seager Wheeler's Maple Grove Farm)
A 17-hectare (42-acre) farmstead established by farmer, agronomist and pioneering seed breeder Seager Wheeler; representative of a typical prairie farm of the 1898-1940 era, and reflective of Seager's work during that era
Steele Narrows [51] 1885 (battle) 1950 Loon Lake
54°2′26″N 109°18′34″W / 54.04056°N 109.30944°W / 54.04056; -109.30944 (Steele Narrows)
The site of the last engagement of the North-West Rebellion; a cavalry troop led by Sam Steele overtook a party of Cree led by Wandering Spirit and Big Bear
Wanuskewin [52] 4000 BCE (c.) 1986 Corman Park
52°13′25″N 106°35′42″W / 52.22361°N 106.59500°W / 52.22361; -106.59500 (Wanuskewin)
Archaeological sites representing nearly 6000 years of the history of the Northern Plains peoples, located within a 57-hectare (140-acre) conservation area on the South Saskatchewan River Wooden sign at entrance to Wanuskewin Heritage Park

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Saskatchewan". Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  2. ^ Saskatchewan, National Historic Sites of Canada - administered by Parks Canada
  3. ^ Federal plaque to John Macdonell on Ontarioplaques.com
  4. ^ Glengarry House NHS in Directory of Federal Heritage Designations (DFHD)
  5. ^ Landing of John Guy NHE in DFHD
  6. ^ Addison Sod House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  7. ^ Batoche. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  8. ^ Battle of Cut Knife Hill. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  9. ^ Battle of Duck Lake. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  10. ^ Battle of Tourond's Coulee / Fish Creek. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  11. ^ Battleford Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  12. ^ Biggar Railway Station (Grand Trunk Pacific). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  13. ^ Canadian Bank of Commerce. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 6 August 2012.
  14. ^ Carlton House. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  15. ^ Claybank Brick Plant. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  16. ^ College Building. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  17. ^ Cumberland House. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  18. ^ Cypress Hills Massacre. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  19. ^ Doukhobor Dugout House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  20. ^ Doukhobors at Veregin. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 August 2012.
  21. ^ Esterhazy Flour Mill. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 August 2012.
  22. ^ Forestry Farm Park and Zoo. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 August 2012.
  23. ^ Former Prince Albert City Hall. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 11 August 2012.
  24. ^ Fort à la Corne. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  25. ^ Fort Battleford. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  26. ^ Fort Espérance. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  27. ^ Fort Livingstone. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  28. ^ Fort Pelly. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  29. ^ Fort Pitt. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  30. ^ Fort Qu'Appelle. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  31. ^ Fort Walsh. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  32. ^ Frenchman Butte. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 August 2012.
  33. ^ Government House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 13 August 2012.
  34. ^ Gravelbourg Ecclesiastical Buildings. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  35. ^ Gray Burial Site. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  36. ^ Holy Trinity Church. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  37. ^ Humboldt Post Office. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  38. ^ Île-à-la-Crosse. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  39. ^ Keyhole Castle. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  40. ^ Last Mountain Lake Bird Sanctuary. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 18 August 2012.
  41. ^ Marr Residence, Parks Canada news release, July 4, 2016
  42. ^ Melville Railway Station, Melville, Saskatchewan, Parks Canada backgrounder, Feb. 15, 2016
  43. ^ Montgomery Place, Parks Canada backgrounder, July 4, 2016
  44. ^ Moose Jaw Court House. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  45. ^ Motherwell Homestead. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  46. ^ Next of Kin Memorial Avenue. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  47. ^ Old Government House / Saint-Charles Scholasticate. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  48. ^ Saskatchewan Legislative Building and Grounds. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  49. ^ Saskatoon Railway Station (Canadian Pacific). Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  50. ^ Seager Wheeler's Maple Grove Farm. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  51. ^ Steele Narrows. Directory of Federal Heritage Designations. Parks Canada. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  52. ^ Wanuskewin. Canadian Register of Historic Places. Retrieved 19 August 2012.