List of Nobel laureates affiliated with Imperial College London

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Fifteen Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Imperial College London. The building pictured is the Royal School of Mines.

The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the Karolinska Institute, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of chemistry, physics, literature, peace, and physiology or medicine.[1] They were established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, which dictates that the awards should be administered by the Nobel Foundation. Another prize, the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, was established in 1968 by the Sveriges Riksbank, the central bank of Sweden, for contributors to the field of economics.[2] Each prize is awarded by a separate committee: the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awards the Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, and Economics, the Karolinska Institute awards the Prize in Physiology or Medicine, and the Norwegian Nobel Committee awards the Prize in Peace.[3] Each recipient receives a medal, a diploma and a cash prize that has varied throughout the years.[2] In 1901, the winners of the first Nobel Prizes were given 150,782 SEK, which is equal to 7,731,004 SEK in December 2007. In 2008, the winners were awarded a prize amount of 10,000,000 SEK.[4] The awards are presented in Stockholm in an annual ceremony on December 10, the anniversary of Nobel's death.[5]

As of 2009, there have been 15 Nobel laureates affiliated with Imperial College London. Imperial College considers laureates who attended the university as undergraduate students, graduate students or were members of the faculty as affiliated laureates.[6] Frederick Gowland Hopkins, who attended the Royal School of Mines from 1881 to 1883, was the first Imperial College-affiliated laureate, winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1929.[7] One Nobel Prize was shared by two Imperial College laureates; Ernst Boris Chain and Alexander Fleming won the 1945 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.[8] Thirteen of the fifteen Imperial College laureates were members of the faculty.[6] Nine laureates were fellows of the college. No Imperial College laureate has won the Nobel Prize in Literature, the Nobel Peace Prize, or the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.

Laureates[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Category Rationale
1929 Hopkins, Frederick GowlandFrederick Gowland Hopkins
(shared with Christiaan Eijkman)
Student, Royal School of Mines, 1881–1883 Physiology or Medicine "for his discovery of the growth-stimulating vitamins"[7]
1937 George Paget Thomson.jpg Thomson, George PagetGeorge Paget Thomson
(shared with Clinton Davisson)
Professor of Physics 1930–1952; Fellow of Imperial College, 1955 Physics "for their experimental discovery of the diffraction of electrons by crystals"[9]
1945 Chain, Ernst BorisErnst Boris Chain
(shared with Alexander Fleming and Howard Florey, Baron Florey)
Professor of Bacteriology, 1928–1948, St Mary's Hospital Medical School Physiology or Medicine "for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effect in various infectious diseases"[8]
1945 Faroe stamp 079 europe (fleming).jpg Fleming, AlexanderAlexander Fleming
(shared with Ernst Boris Chain and Howard Florey, Baron Florey)
Professor of Bacteriology, 1928–1948, St Mary's Hospital Medical School Physiology or Medicine "for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effect in various infectious diseases"[8]
1948 Blackett-large.jpg Blackett, Patrick Blackett, BaronPatrick Blackett, Baron Blackett Professor of Physics, 1953–65; Fellow of Imperial College, 1967 Physics "for his development of the Wilson cloud chamber method, and his discoveries therewith in the fields of nuclear physics and cosmic radiation"[10]
1956 Hinshelwood, Cyril NormanCyril Norman Hinshelwood
(shared with Nikolay Semenov)
Senior Research Fellow Imperial College, 1964–1967 Chemistry "for their researches into the mechanism of chemical reactions"[11]
1963 Andrew huxley trinity.png Huxley, AndrewAndrew Huxley
(shared with John Carew Eccles and Alan Lloyd Hodgkin)
Fellow of Imperial College, 1980 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the ionic mechanisms involved in excitation and inhibition in the peripheral and central portions of the nerve cell membrane"[12]
1967 Porter, GeorgeGeorge Porter
(shared with Manfred Eigen and Ronald George Wreyford Norrish)
Visiting Professor, Department of Biology 1978–2002; Fellow of Imperial College, 1987 Chemistry "for their studies of extremely fast chemical reactions, effected by disturbing the equilibrium by means of very short pulses of energy"[13]
1969 Barton, DerekDerek Barton
(shared with Odd Hassel)
Professor of Organic Chemistry, 1957–1978; Fellow of Imperial College, 1980; Emeritus Professor, 1978 Chemistry "for their contributions to the development of the concept of conformation and its application in chemistry"[14]
1971 Gabor, DennisDennis Gabor Professor of Electron Physics, 1958–67; Fellow of Imperial College, 1970 Physics "for his invention and development of the holographic method"[15]
1972 Porter, Rodney RobertRodney Robert Porter
(shared with Gerald Edelman)
Pfizer Professor of Immunology, ; St Mary's Hospital Medical School 1960–1967 Physiology or Medicine "for their discoveries concerning the chemical structure of antibodies"[16]
1973 Wilkinson, GeoffreyGeoffrey Wilkinson
(shared with Ernst Otto Fischer)
Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, 1956–1996; Emeritus Professor 1988; Fellow of Imperial College, 1993 Chemistry "for their pioneering work, performed independently, on the chemistry of the organometallic, so called sandwich compounds"[17]
1979 Salam, AbdusAbdus Salam
(shared with Sheldon Lee Glashow and Steven Weinberg)
Professor of Theoretical Physics, 1957–1996; Emeritus Professor, 1993; Fellow of Imperial College, 1994 Physics "for their contributions to the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interaction between elementary particles, including, inter alia, the prediction of the weak neutral current"[18]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "Alfred Nobel – The Man Behind the Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  2. ^ a b "The Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  3. ^ "The Nobel Prize Awarders". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  4. ^ "The Nobel Prize Amounts". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. [dead link]
  5. ^ "The Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. [dead link]
  6. ^ a b "Nobel Laureates". Imperial College London. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  7. ^ a b "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1929". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  8. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1945". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  9. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1937". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  10. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1948". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  11. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1956". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  12. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1963". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  13. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1967". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  14. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1969". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  15. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1971". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  16. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1972". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  17. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1973". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 
  18. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1979". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14. 

External links[edit]