List of Nobel laureates affiliated with Johns Hopkins University

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As of October 2019, 39 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Johns Hopkins University. The statue pictured is the Johns Hopkins Monument at the university.

This list of Nobel laureates affiliated with Johns Hopkins University comprehensively shows the alumni, faculty members as well as researchers of Johns Hopkins University who were awarded the Nobel Prize or the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Nobel Prizes, established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, are awarded to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physics, and Physiology or Medicine.[1] An associated prize, the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (commonly known as the Nobel Prize in Economics), was instituted by Sweden's central bank, Sveriges Riksbank, in 1968 and first awarded in 1969.[2]

As of October 2019, there have been 39 Nobel laureates affiliated with Johns Hopkins University, and 29 of them are officially listed as "Johns Hopkins' Nobel Laureates" by the university.[3] Among the 39 laureates, 16 are Johns Hopkins' alumni (graduates and attendees), 15 are long-term faculty members and 16 are researchers (eight overlaps). Subject-wise, 18 Johns Hopkins laureates have won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, more than any other subject.

Woodrow Wilson, who received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins in 1886, was the first Johns Hopkins-affiliated laureate, winning the Nobel Peace Prize in 1919.[4][5] Four Nobel Prizes were shared by Johns Hopkins laureates: George Minot and George Whipple won the 1934 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine,[6] Joseph Erlanger and Herbert Spencer Gasser won the 1944 Nobel Prize in Physiology in Medicine,[7] Daniel Nathans and Hamilton O. Smith won the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine,[8] and David H. Hubel and Torsten N. Wiesel won the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.[9]

Inclusion criteria[edit]

Johns Hopkins University

The university affiliations in this list are all official academic affiliations such as degree programs and official academic employment. Non-academic affiliations such as advisory committee and administrative staff are generally excluded. The official academic affiliations fall into three categories: 1) Alumni (graduates and attendees), 2) Long-term Academic Staff, and 3) Short-term Academic Staff. Graduates are defined as those who hold Bachelor's, Master's, Doctorate, or equivalent degrees from Princeton, while attendees are those who formally enrolled in a degree program at Johns Hopkins but did not complete the program; thus, honorary degrees, posthumous degrees, summer attendees, exchange students, and auditing students are excluded. The category of "Long-term Academic Staff" consists of tenure/tenure-track and equivalent academic positions, while that of "Short-term Academic Staff" consists of lecturers (without tenure), postdoctoral researchers(postdocs), visiting professors/scholars (visitors), and equivalent academic positions. At Johns Hopkins, the specific academic title solely determines the type of affiliation, regardless of the actual time the position was held by a laureate.

Further explanations on "visitors" under "Short-term Academic Staff" are presented as follows. 1) All informal or personal visits are excluded from the list; 2) all employment-based visiting positions, which carry teaching/research duties, are included as affiliations in the list; 3) as for award/honor-based visiting positions, to minimize controversy this list takes a conservative view and includes the positions as affiliations only if the laureates were required to assume employment-level duty (teaching/research) or the laureates specifically classified the visiting positions as "affiliation" or similar in reliable sources such as their curriculum vita. In particular, attending meetings and giving public lectures, talks or non-curricular seminars at Johns Hopkins University is not a form of employment-level duty. Finally, summer visitors are generally excluded from the list unless summer work yielded significant end products such as research publications and components of Nobel-winning work, since summer terms are not part of formal academic years.

Nobel laureates by category[edit]

Nobel laureates in Physics[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1925 James Franck
(shared with Gustav Ludwig Hertz)
Professor of Physics, 1935–38 "for their discovery of the laws governing the impact of an electron upon an atom"[10]
1963 Maria Goeppert-Mayer
(shared with Eugene Wigner and J. Hans D. Jensen)
Assistant in Physics, 1930–32; Associate, 1932–36 "for their discoveries concerning nuclear shell structure"[11]
2002 Riccardo Giacconi
(shared with Raymond Davis, Jr. and Masatoshi Koshiba)
Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 1982–1997; Research Professor of Physics and Astronomy 1998–present "for pioneering contributions to astrophysics, which have led to the discovery of cosmic X-ray sources"[12]
2011 Adam Riess
(shared with Brian Schmidt and Saul Perlmutter)
Krieger-Eisenhower Professor in Physics and Astronomy, Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae."[13]

Nobel laureates in Chemistry[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1934 Harold Urey Associate in Chemistry, 1924–28 "for his discovery of heavy hydrogen"[14]
1955 Vincent du Vigneaud
(shared with Cyril Norman Hinshelwood and Nikolay Semenov)
National Research Fellow, Pharmacology 1927–28 "for his work on biochemically important sulphur compounds, especially for the first synthesis of a polypeptide hormone"[15]
1968 Lars Onsager Associate in Chemistry, 1927–28 "for the discovery of the reciprocal relations bearing his name, which are fundamental for the thermodynamics of irreversible processes"[16]
1972 Christian B. Anfinsen, NIH portrait, 1969.jpg Christian B. Anfinsen
(shared with Stanford Moore and William Howard Stein)
Professor of Biology, 1982–1995 "for his work on ribonuclease, especially concerning the connection between the amino acid sequence and the biologically active conformation"[17]
2003 Peter Agre
(shared with Roderick MacKinnon)
M.D., 1974; Postdoctoral fellow, Department of Pharmacology, 1974–75; Research Associate/Instructor, Cell Biology and Anatomy, and Medicine, 1981–83; Assistant Professor, 1984–88; Associate Professor, 1988–93; Professor of Biological Chemistry and Medicine, 1993–2005 "for discoveries concerning channels in cell membranes [...] for the discovery of water channels"[18]

Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1933 Thomas Hunt Morgan Ph.D., 1890; LL.D., 1915 "for his discoveries concerning the role played by the chromosome in heredity"[19]
1934 George Minot
(shared with George Whipple and William P. Murphy)
Assistant in Medicine, 1914–15 "for their discoveries concerning liver therapy in cases of anaemia"[6]
1934 George Whipple
(shared with George Minot and William P. Murphy)
M.D., 1905; Associate Professor in Pathology, 1910–14 "for their discoveries concerning liver therapy in cases of anaemia"[6]
1944 Joseph Erlanger
(shared with Herbert Spencer Gasser)
M.D., 1899; Assistant in Physiology, 1900–01; Instructor, 1901–03; Associate, 1903–04; Associate Professor, 1904–06; LL.D., 1947 "for their discoveries relating to the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibres"[7]
1944 Herbert Spencer Gasser
(shared with Joseph Erlanger)
M.D., 1915 "for their discoveries relating to the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibres"[7]
1966 Francis Peyton Rous
(shared with Charles Brenton Huggins)
A.B., 1900; M.D., 1905 "for his discovery of tumour-inducing viruses"[20]
1967 Haldan Keffer Hartline
(shared with Ragnar Granit and George Wald)
M.D. 1927; Professor of Biophysics, 1949–54 "for their discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye"[21]
1978 Daniel Nathans
(shared with Werner Arber and Hamilton O. Smith)
Assistant Professor, 1962–65; Associate Professor, 1965–67; Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 1967–1999; Interim President, 1995–96 "for the discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to problems of molecular genetics"[8]
1978 Hamilton Smith.jpg Hamilton O. Smith
(shared with Werner Arber and Daniel Nathans)
M.D., 1956; Assistant Professor of Microbiology, 1967–69; Associate Professor, 1969–1973; Professor, 1973–1998; Professor Emeritus 1998–present "for the discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to problems of molecular genetics"[8]
1981 David H. Hubel
(shared with Torsten N. Wiesel)
Assistant Resident, Neurology, 1954–55; Fellow, Neuroscience, 1958–59 "for their discoveries concerning information processing in the visual system"[9]
1981 Torsten N. Wiesel
(shared with David H. Hubel)
Fellow, Ophthalmology, 1955–58; Assistant Professor, 1958–59 "for their discoveries concerning information processing in the visual system"[9]
1994 Martin Rodbell
(shared with Alfred G. Gilman)
B.A., 1949 "for their discovery of G-proteins and the role of these proteins in signal transduction in cells"[22]
2000 Paul Greengard
(shared with Arvid Carlsson and Eric Kandel)
Ph.D., 1953 "for their discoveries concerning signal transduction in the nervous system"[23]
2004 Richard Axel
(shared with Linda B. Buck)
M.D., 1971 "for their discoveries of odorant receptors and the organization of the olfactory system"[24]
2006 Andrew Fire
(shared with Craig Mello)
Adjunct professor of biology, 1989–present "for their discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by double-stranded RNA"[25]
2009 Carol Greider
(shared with Elizabeth H. Blackburn and Jack W. Szostak)
Daniel Nathans Professor and the Director of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins Institute of Basic Biomedical Sciences "for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase"[26]
2019 Gregg L. Semenza
(shared with William G. Kaelin and Peter J. Ratcliffe)
C. Michael Armstrong Professor of Genetic Medicine, Biological Chemistry, Medicine, Pediatrics, Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences and Director of the Vascular Program at the Johns Hopkins Institute of Cell Engineering "for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability"[27]
2019 William Kaelin Jr. Medical Resident and Postdoctoral Fellow[28]

Nobel Memorial Prize laureates in Economics[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1971 Simon Kuznets Professor of Political Economy, 1954–60 "for his empirically founded interpretation of economic growth which has led to new and deepened insight into the economic and social structure and process of development"[29]
1984 Richard Stone Visiting Professor, Political Economy 1953–54 "for having made fundamental contributions to the development of systems of national accounts and hence greatly improved the basis for empirical economic analysis"[30]
1990 Merton Miller
(shared with Harry Markowitz and William F. Sharpe)
Ph.D., 1952; Honorary doctorate, 1993 "for their pioneering work in the theory of financial economics"[31]
1993 Robert Fogel
(shared with Douglass North)
Ph.D., 1963 "for having renewed research in economic history by applying economic theory and quantitative methods in order to explain economic and institutional change"[32]
1999 Rmundell.jpg Robert Mundell Visiting faculty at SAIS Bologna Center, 2000–2001; AGIP Chair in International Economics at the center, 1997–98; also was on the center's faculty, 1959–61 "for his analysis of monetary and fiscal policy under different exchange rate regimes and his analysis of optimum currency areas"[33]

Nobel laureates in Literature[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
2003 J.M. Coetzee.JPG J. M. Coetzee Hinkley Visiting Professor in the Writing Seminars, January 1, 1989 to June 30, 1989 "who in innumerable guises portrays the surprising involvement of the outsider"[34]

Nobel Peace Prize laureates[edit]

Year Image Laureate Relation Rationale
1919 President Woodrow Wilson portrait December 2 1912.jpg Woodrow Wilson Ph.D., 1886 "President of United States of America; Founder of the League of Nations"[5]
1931 Nicholas Murray Butler
(shared with Jane Addams)
Lecturer, 1890–91 "President, Columbia University; Promoter of Briand Kellogg Pact"[35]
1997 JodyWilliams1.jpg Jody Williams
(shared with the International Campaign to Ban Landmines)
M.A., 1984 "for their work for the banning and clearing of anti-personnel mines"[36]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alfred Nobel – The Man Behind the Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  2. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 18 May 2017.
  3. ^ "Nobel Prize winners". Johns Hopkins University. Retrieved 2019-04-17.
  4. ^ "Nobel Prize Winners". Johns Hopkins University. Archived from the original on 2014-02-08. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  5. ^ a b "Nobel Peace Prize 1919". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-01-24.
  6. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1934". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  7. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1944". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  8. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1978". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  9. ^ a b c "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1981". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  10. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1925". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-01-24.
  11. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 1963". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-01-24.
  12. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2002". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-01-24.
  13. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physics 2011". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2011-10-14.
  14. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1934". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  15. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1955". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  16. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1968". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  17. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1972". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  18. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2003". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  19. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1933". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  20. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1966". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  21. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1967". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  22. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1994". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  23. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2000". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  24. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2004". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  25. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2006". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.
  26. ^ "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2009". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2010-01-26.
  27. ^ https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2019/press-release. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  28. ^ "William G. Kaelin, Jr. | Researcher". Breast Cancer Research Foundation. 2014-06-19. Retrieved 2019-10-15.
  29. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1971". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  30. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1984". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  31. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1990". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  32. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1993". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  33. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 1999". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  34. ^ "Nobel Prize in Literature 2003". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-14.
  35. ^ "Nobel Peace Prize 1931". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-01-24.
  36. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1997". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 2009-03-13.

External links[edit]