List of Nobel laureates affiliated with the University of Chicago

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Some of the Nobel laureates of the University of Chicago include Arthur Holly Compton (first from left), Werner Heisenberg (second from left), and Robert S. Mulliken (third from right). At the University of Chicago, Compton was a professor from 1923 to 1945,[1] Heisenberg was a visitor in Spring 1929,[2] and Mulliken (Ph.D. in 1921) was a professor from 1928 to 1986.[3]

This list of Nobel laureates affiliated with the University of Chicago comprehensively shows the alumni, faculty members as well as researchers of the University of Chicago who were awarded the Nobel Prize or the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Nobel Prizes, established by the 1895 will of Alfred Nobel, are awarded to individuals who make outstanding contributions in the fields of Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physics, and Physiology or Medicine.[4] An associated prize, the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (commonly known as the Nobel Prize in Economics), was instituted by Sweden's central bank, Sveriges Riksbank, in 1968 and first awarded in 1969.[5]

As of October 2019, 100 Nobel laureates have been affiliated with the University of Chicago. Among the 100 laureates, 95 are the laureates of the scientific Nobel Prizes and the Nobel Prize in Economics; 34 are UChicago alumni (graduates and attendees) and 48 have been long-term academic members of the university; and, subject-wise, 33 have won the Nobel Prize in Economics, more than any other subject (for verification, see "Summary"). This list considers Nobel laureates as equal individuals and does not consider their various prize shares or if they received the prize more than once.[6]

Inclusion criteria[edit]

General rules[edit]

View of the University of Chicago from the Midway Plaisance.

The affiliations of the University of Chicago in this list include all the official academic affiliations such as official academic employment and degree programs of the university. The official academic affiliations include alumni (graduates and attendees), long-term faculty members, and short-term academic staff.

Graduates are defined as those who hold bachelor's, master's, doctorate, or equivalent degrees from the university, while attendees are those who studied at the university, but did not complete the degree program or obtain a formal degree. Honorary degrees, posthumous degrees, summer attendees, exchange students, and auditing students are excluded from this list. Those who hold certificates or studied as non-degree students at the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies, the extension school of the university, are also excluded.

The long-term faculty members consist of tenure or tenure-track and equivalent academic positions, while short-term academic staff consist of lecturers (without tenure), postdoctoral researchers (postdocs), visiting professors or scholars (visitors), and equivalent academic positions. At the University of Chicago, the specific academic title solely determines the type of affiliation, regardless of the actual time the position was held by a laureate.

Further explanations on visitors under short-term academic staff are presented as follows. 1) All informal or personal visits are excluded from the list; 2) all employment-based visiting positions, which carry teaching or research duties, are included as affiliations in the list; 3) as for award or honor-based visiting positions, to minimize controversy this list takes a conservative view and includes the positions as affiliations only if the laureates were required to assume employment-level duty (teaching or research) or the laureates specifically classified the visiting positions as "affiliation" or similar in reliable sources such as their curriculum vita. To be specific, visiting positions such as the "Albert Dorfman Memorial Lecture" and "Greensfelder Memorial Lecture" are awards or honors or recognition without employment-level duty, and thus will not be counted in this list. In particular, attending meetings and giving public lectures, talks or non-curricular seminars is not a form of employment-level duty. This list also exclude those who held non-academic positions (for instance, advisory committee, administrative staff, etc.) at the university. Finally, summer visitors are generally excluded from the list unless summer work yielded significant end products such as research publications and components of Nobel-winning work, since summer terms are not part of formal academic years; the same rule applies to the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies.

This list does not include Nobel-winning organizations or any individuals affiliated with those organizations. It also doesn't include affiliates of institutions that later merged and became part of the University of Chicago. For instance, the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy (founded in 1908) merged with the university in 1920 to become one of its graduate schools, the School of Social Service Administration;[7] the affiliates of the School before 1920 are excluded from this list.

Some attendees and visitors not qualified as official academic affiliates
Name Nobel Prize Year Role in the University of Chicago
George Akerlof Economic Sciences 2001 Summer attendee (1965) (Participated in a workshop organized by Hirofumi Uzawa)[8][9]
Joseph Stiglitz Economic Sciences 2001 Summer attendee (1965) (Participated in a workshop organized by Hirofumi Uzawa)[8][9]
Wolfgang Paul Physics 1989 Guest lecturer (1978)[10][11]
Gerald Edelman Physiology or Medicine 1972 Albert Dorfman Memorial Lecture (1984)[12]
Donald A. Glaser Physics 1960 A possible visiting researcher; will not be included until further confirmation.[13][14]
Max Born Physics 1954 Visiting lecturer (Summer 1912), delivered lectures on the theory of relativity[15][16][17][18]
T. S. Eliot Literature 1948 Visiting lecturer at the Committee on Social Thought (1950), delivered four public lectures on "Education"[19][20][21]
Hermann Joseph Muller Physiology or Medicine 1946 Visiting lecturer (Summer 1925) and a civilian advisor (non-academic role) in the Manhattan project[22][23]
Corneille Heymans Physiology or Medicine 1938 Greensfelder Memorial Lecture (1937)[24]
Jane Addams Peace 1931 Taught college courses through the extension division of UChicago;[25] She also taught at the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy[26]
Jacobus Hoff Chemistry 1901 Visiting lecturer (Summer 1901)[27][28]

Affiliated organizations[edit]

Argonne National Laboratory has been operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since the laboratory was established in 1946.[29] The lab belongs to the DOE, and is directly operated by a limited liability company named UChicago Argonne LLC, which is a subsidiary of University of Chicago.[30] The affiliates of the lab since 1946 are included in this page. However, some Nobel laureates were only facility users at the lab, and didn't form official academic affiliations with the lab. In such cases, the laureates are excluded from the list. For instance, although Nobel laureates Alan J. Heeger, Brian K. Kobilka, Johann Deisenhofer and John A. Pople used the Argonne lab facilities such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), they are not included because they did not form official academic affiliations with the lab.[31][32][33]

The Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, established in 1932 by Alfred Cowles at Colorado Springs, Colorado, moved to Chicago in 1939, and had formed an affiliation with University of Chicago until 1955.[34] In this list, the affiliates of the Foundation by 1955 are included.[35]

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has been operated by Fermi Research Alliance LLC for the DOE Office of Science since 2007.[36] Fermi Research Alliance LLC is a joint venture of University of Chicago and the Universities Research Association (URA), an association of several research universities.[37] Since, Fermilab is not directly affiliated with or operated by UChicago, the affiliates of the lab are excluded from this list.

Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) became formally affiliated with the University of Chicago on July 1, 2013.[29] MBL scientists include Resident Scientists, who are the full-time researchers of MBL, and also MBL Fellows and Whitman Center Scientists, who are employees of other universities and research organizations, and come to the lab for specific research projects.[38] Resident Scientists of the lab since July 1, 2013 are included in this list.

Summary[edit]

According to Wikipedia policies on no original research and objectivity/neutrality, it is not possible in Wikipedia to assign various weights to different types of affiliations. Hence, all types of affiliations count equally in the following table and throughout the whole page.

The following table summarizes the Nobel laureates affiliated with the University of Chicago. In the table, the number following a person's name is the year they received the prize; in particular, a number with asterisk (*) means the person received the award while they were working at the University of Chicago (including emeritus staff). A name underlined implies that this person has already been listed in a previous category (i.e., multiple affiliations). The table doesn't provide citations or details on entries; for citations and details, see "Nobel laureates by category".

Category Alumni Long-term academic staff Short-term academic staff
Physics (32)
  1. George E. Smith - 2009
  2. Frank Wilczek - 2004
  3. Daniel Tsui - 1998
  4. Jerome I. Friedman - 1990
  5. Jack Steinberger - 1988
  6. James Cronin - 1980
  7. Luis W. Alvarez - 1968
  8. Owen Chamberlain - 1959
  9. C. N. Yang - 1957
  10. T. D. Lee - 1957
  11. Ernest Lawrence - 1939
  12. Clinton Davisson - 1937
  1. Yoichiro Nambu - 2008*
  2. Alexei A. Abrikosov - 2003
  3. Masatoshi Koshiba - 2002
  4. Leon Lederman - 1988
  5. S. Chandrasekhar - 1983*
  6. James Cronin - 1980*
  7. John Schrieffer - 1972
  8. Maria Mayer - 1963
  9. Murray Gell-Mann - 1969
  10. Enrico Fermi - 1938
  11. Arthur Compton - 1927*
  12. James Franck - 1925
  13. Robert Millikan - 1923
  14. Albert Michelson - 1907*
  1. Kip Thorne - 2017
  2. Peter Grünberg - 2007
  3. Masatoshi Koshiba - 2002
  4. Norman Ramsey - 1989
  5. Luis W. Alvarez - 1968
  6. Hans Bethe - 1967
  7. Julian Schwinger - 1965
  8. Eugene Wigner - 1963
  9. C. N. Yang - 1957
  10. Werner Heisenberg- 1932
Chemistry (19)
  1. John B. Goodenough - 2019
  2. Irwin Rose - 2004
  3. Frank Rowland - 1995
  4. Herbert C. Brown - 1979
  5. Robert Mulliken - 1966
  1. Paul Crutzen - 1995
  2. Y. T. Lee - 1986
  3. Henry Taube - 1983
  4. Ilya Prigogine - 1977
  5. Gerhard Herzberg - 1971
  6. Robert Mulliken - 1966*
  7. Willard Libby - 1960
  8. Harold Urey - 1934
  1. Ada Yonath - 2009
  2. Richard Smalley - 1996
  3. Jerome Karle - 1985
  4. Herbert C. Brown - 1979
  5. William H. Stein - 1972
  6. Robert Mulliken - 1966
  7. Karl Ziegler - 1963
  8. Lord Todd- 1957
  9. Glenn Seaborg - 1951
Physiology or Medicine (11)
  1. Bruce Beutler - 2011
  2. Roger Sperry - 1981
  3. James Watson - 1962
  4. Edward Tatum - 1958
  1. Roger Sperry - 1981
  2. Charles Huggins - 1966*
  3. Konrad Bloch - 1964
  4. George Beadle - 1958
  1. George Wald - 1967
  2. John C. Eccles - 1963
  3. Edward Doisy - 1943
  4. Alexis Carrel - 1912
Economic Sciences (33)
  1. Paul Romer - 2018
  2. Eugene Fama - 2013
  3. Myron Scholes - 1997
  4. Robert Lucas Jr. - 1995
  5. Gary Becker - 1992
  6. Harry Markowitz - 1990
  7. James M. Buchanan - 1986
  8. George Stigler - 1982
  9. Herbert A. Simon - 1978
  10. Milton Friedman - 1976
  11. Paul Samuelson - 1970
  1. Paul Romer - 2018
  2. Richard Thaler - 2017*
  3. Eugene Fama - 2013*
  4. Lars P. Hansen - 2013*
  5. Thomas Sargent - 2011
  6. Roger Myerson - 2007*
  7. Edward Prescott - 2004
  8. James Heckman - 2000*
  9. Robert Mundell - 1999
  10. Robert Lucas Jr- 1995*
  11. Robert Fogel - 1993*
  12. Gary Becker - 1992*
  13. Ronald Coase - 1991*
  14. Merton Miller - 1990*
  15. George Stigler- 1982*
  16. Theodore Schultz - 1979*
  17. Milton Friedman - 1976*
  18. Friedrich Hayek - 1974
  19. Kenneth Arrow - 1972
  1. Michael Kremer - 2019
  2. Bengt Holmström - 2016
  3. Thomas Sargent - 2011
  4. Leonid Hurwicz - 2007
  5. Edward Prescott - 2004
  6. Daniel McFadden - 2000
  7. Robert Mundell - 1999
  8. Robert Lucas Jr - 1995
  9. Robert Fogel - 1993
  10. Gary Becker- 1992
  11. Trygve Haavelmo- 1989
  12. Franco Modigliani - 1985
  13. Gérard Debreu - 1983
  14. Lawrence Klein - 1980
  15. Tjalling Koopmans - 1975
Literature (3)
  1. Saul Bellow - 1976
  1. Saul Bellow- 1976*
  2. J. M. Coetzee - 2003*
  1. Bertrand Russell - 1950
Peace (2)
  1. Emily Balch - 1946
  1. Barack Obama - 2009

Nobel laureates by category[edit]

Nobel laureates in Physics[edit]

Name Year Affiliation with the University of Chicago
Kip Thorne 2017 Visiting Associate Professor of Physics (January–June 1968)[39][40]
George Elwood Smith 2009 Ph.D. in Physics (1959)[41]
Yoichiro Nambu 2008 Research Associate (1954–1956), Associate Professor of Physics (1956–1958), Professor of Physics (1958–1971), Distinguished Service Professor (1971–1976), Chairman of the Department of Physics (1973–1976), Harry Judson Distinguished Service Professor (1976–1991), and Harry Judson Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus (1991–2015)[42]
Peter Grünberg 2007 Visiting Researcher at Argonne National Laboratory (1984–1985)[43][44]
Frank Wilczek 2004 B.S. in Mathematics (1970)[45]
Alexei Alexeyevich Abrikosov 2003 Distinguished Senior Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory (1991–2017)[46]
Masatoshi Koshiba 2002 Research Associate (July 1955–February 1958), and Senior Research Associate with the honorary rank of Associate Professor and the Acting Director of the Laboratory of High Energy Physics and Cosmic Radiation at the Department of Physics (November 1959–August 1962)[47]
Daniel Tsui 1998 M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics (1967)[48]
Jerome Isaac Friedman 1990 B.A. (1950) and Ph.D. in Physics (1956)[49]
Norman Foster Ramsey Jr. 1989 Visiting Professor (1988)[50]
Leon M. Lederman 1988 Frank L. Sulzberger Professor of Physics (1989–1992)[51]
Jack Steinberger 1988 B.S. in Chemistry (1942) and Ph.D in Physics (1948)[52][53]
Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar 1983 Assistant Professor to Professor (January 1937–1946), Distinguished Service Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics (1947–1952), Morton D. Hull Distinguished Service Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics (1952–1985), and Morton D. Hull Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus (1986–1995)[54][55]
James Cronin 1980 M.S. (1953) and Ph.D. (1955) in Physics; Professor of Physics (1971–1996), and Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, Astrophysics, and Physics (1996–2016)[56]
John Robert Schrieffer 1972 Assistant Professor of Physics (1958–1959)[57]
Murray Gell-Mann 1969 Instructor (1952–1953), and Assistant Professor (1953–1954)[58]
Luis Walter Alvarez 1968 B.S. (1932), M.S. (1934), and Ph.D. (1936)[59]
Hans Albrecht Bethe 1967 Worked on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1942)[60][61]
Julian Schwinger 1965 Worked on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1943)[62]
Maria Goeppert-Mayer 1963 Professor at the Department of Physics, and the Institute for Nuclear Studies (1946–1960)[63]
Eugene Paul Wigner 1963 Worked on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1942–1945)[64]
Owen Chamberlain 1959 Ph.D. in Physics (1949)[65]
Tsung-Dao Lee 1957 Ph.D. in Physics (1950)[66]
Chen Ning Yang 1957 Ph.D. in Physics (1948); Instructor (1948–1949)[67]
Ernest Lawrence 1939 Graduate attendee (1923–1924)[68]
Enrico Fermi 1938 Worked on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1942) and Professor at the Institute for Nuclear Studies (1946–1954)[69]
Clinton Davisson 1937 B.S. (August 1908)[70]
Werner Heisenberg 1932 Visiting lecturer (Spring 1929)[2]
Arthur Holly Compton 1927 Professor of Physics (1923–1929) and Swift Distinguished Service Professor (1929–1945)[1][71]
James Franck 1925 Professor of Physical Chemistry (1938–1947) and Professor Emeritus of Physical Chemistry (1947–1964)[72]
Robert Andrews Millikan 1923 Assistant in Physics (1896–1897), Associate in Physics (1897–1899), Instructor in Physics (1899–1902), Assistant Professor of Physics (1902–1907), Associate Professor of Physics (1907–1910), and Professor of Physics (1910–1921)[73]
Albert Abraham Michelson 1907 Professor of Physics and the first Head of the Department of Physics in 1892; he was professor until the World War I, and he returned to the Department of Physics in 1918; the Distinguished Service Professor (1925–1929)[74]

Nobel laureates in Chemistry[edit]

Name Year Affiliation with the University of Chicago
John B. Goodenough 2019 M.S. (1951) and Ph.D. in Physics (1952)[75]
Ada Yonath 2009 Visiting Scientist (1977–1978)[76]
Irwin Rose 2004 B.S. (1948) and Ph.D. in Biochemistry (1952)[77]
Richard E. Smalley 1996 Postdoctoral researcher (1973–1976)[78]
Paul J. Crutzen 1995 Professor (part-time) at the Department of Geophysical Sciences (1987–1991)[79]
F. Sherwood Rowland 1995 M.S. (1951) and Ph.D. (1952)[80]
Yuan T. Lee 1986 Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry and the James Franck Institute (October 1968–1971), Associate Professor (October 1971–1973), and Professor (January 1973–1974)[81]
Jerome Karle 1985 Researcher at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1943–1944) during the Manhattan Project[82][83]
Henry Taube 1983 Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor (1946–1961)[84]
Herbert C. Brown 1979 B.S. (1936) and Ph.D. (1938)[85]
Ilya Prigogine 1977 Visiting Professor of Chemistry at the Department of Chemistry and the Enrico Fermi Institute for Nuclear Studies (1961–1966)[86][87]
William Howard Stein 1972 Visiting Professor (1961)[88]
Gerhard Herzberg 1971 Professor of Spectroscopy at the Yerkes Observatory (1945–1948)[89]
Robert S. Mulliken 1966 Ph.D. (1921); NRC Fellow (1921–1925), Associate Professor of Physics (1928–1931), Professor of Physics (1931–1961), Ernest de Witt Burton Distinguished Service Professor (1956–1961), and Distinguished Service Professor of Physics and Chemistry (1961–1986)[3]
Karl Ziegler 1963 Visiting Professor (1936)[90]
Willard Libby 1960 Professor of Chemistry at the Department of Chemistry and Institute for Nuclear Studies (1945–1954)[91]
Alexander R. Todd 1957 Visiting Professor of Biochemsitry (Autumn 1948)[92]
Glenn Theodore Seaborg 1951 Worked on the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory (1942–1946)[93]
Harold Clayton Urey 1934 Distinguished Service Professor of Chemistry (1945–1952) and Martin A. Ryerson Professor (1952–1958)[94]

Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine[edit]

Name Year Affiliation with the University of Chicago
Bruce Beutler 2011 M.D. (1981)[95]
Roger Sperry 1981 Ph.D. in Zoology (1941); Assistant professor, Department of Anatomy (1946–1952) and Associate Professor of Psychology (1952–1953)[96]
George Wald 1967 National Research Council Fellowship in Biology (1933–1934)[97]
Charles Brenton Huggins 1966 Instructor in Surgery (1927–1929), Assistant Professor (1929–1933), Associate Professor (1933–1936), Professor of Surgery (1936–1962), and William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor (1962–1997); also Director at Ben May Laboratory for Cancer Research[98]
Konrad Emil Bloch 1964 Assistant Professor of Biochemistry (1946–1948), Associate Professor of Biochemistry (1948–1950), and Professor of Biochemistry (1950–1954)[99]
John Carew Eccles 1963 Researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research (1966–1968)[100]
James Dewey Watson 1962 B.S. in Zoology (1947)[101]
George Beadle 1958 Chancellor of the University of Chicago (January 1961–August 1961), and President of the University of Chicago (Autumn of 1961–1968)[102][103]
Edward Lawrie Tatum 1958 Undergraduate attendee (studied for two years during the 1920s)[104]
Edward Adelbert Doisy 1943 Lecturer in Medicine (1940)[105]
Alexis Carrel 1912 Worked in the Department of Physiology (1904–1905)[106]

Nobel Memorial Prize laureates in Economic Sciences[edit]

Name Year Affiliation with the University of Chicago
Michael Kremer 2019 Visiting Assistant Professor (Spring 1993)[107]
Paul Romer 2018 B.S. (1977), M.A. (1978), and Ph.D. in Economics (1983); Professor of Economics (1988–1990)[108][109]
Richard Thaler 2017 Charles R Walgreen Distinguished Service Professor of Economics and Behavioral Science, and Director of the Center for Decision Research at the Booth School of Business (since 1995)[110]
Bengt R. Holmström 2016 Visiting Associate Professor of Economics (Spring 1982) and Visiting Professor at the Initiative on Global Markets (Fall 2006)[111]
Eugene Fama 2013 M.B.A. (1963) and Ph.D. (1964) at the Booth School of Business; Assistant Professor of Finance (1963–1965), Associate Professor of Finance (1966–1968), Professor of Finance (1968–1973), Theodore O. Yntema Professor of Finance (1973–1984), Theodore O. Yntema Distinguished Service Professor of Finance (1984–1993), and Robert R. McCormick Distinguished Service Professor of Finance (since 1993) at the Booth School of Business[112]
Lars Peter Hansen 2013 Associate Professor (1981–1984), Professor in Economics (1984–1990), Homer J. Livingston Professor in Economics (1990–1997), Homer J. Livingston Distinguished Service Professor in Economics (1997–2010), Visiting Professor at the Booth School of Business (2003–2005), Professor in Statistics (since 2007), and David Rockefeller Distinguished Service Professor (since 2010)[113]
Thomas J. Sargent 2011 Ford Foundation Visiting Research Professor of Economics (September 1976–June 1977) and David Rockefeller Professor of Economics (July 1991–July 1998)[114]
Roger Myerson 2007 Visiting Professor of Economics (1985–1986, 2000–2001), Professor of Economics (since 2001), and Glen A. Lloyd Distinguished Service Professor (since 2007)[115][116]
Leonid Hurwicz 2007 Worked in the Institute of Meteorology during the 1940s;[117] Research Associate at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics (1944–1946)[118]
Edward C. Prescott 2004 Ford Visiting Research Professor (1978–1979), Visiting Professor (Spring 1997), and Professor of Economics (1998–1999)[119][120]
James J. Heckman 2001 Associate Professor (1973–1977) (tenured in 1974), Professor of Economics (since 1977), Henry Schultz Professor (1985–1995), Affiliated Faculty at the Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy (1990–2011), Director of the Center for Social Program Evaluation at the Harris School of Public Policy (since 1991), Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor (since 1995), Director of the Economics Research Center at the University of Chicago (1998–2006), Director of the Center for the Study of Childhood Development at the Harris School of Public Policy (2009–2014), Professor of Law at the University of Chicago School of Law (since 2011), Professor at the Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy (since 2011), and Director of the Center for the Economics of Human Development (since 2014)[121][122]
Daniel L. McFadden 2000 Visiting Associate Professor (1966–1967)[123][124]
Robert A. Mundell 1999 Postdoctoral fellow in Political Economy (1956–1957),[125] and Professor of Economics (1966–1971)[126]
Myron Scholes 1997 M.B.A (1964) and Ph.D (1969); Associate Professor (1973–1983)[127]
Robert Lucas Jr. 1995 B.A. in History (1959) and Ph.D. in Economics (1964); Lecturer in the Department of Economics(1962–1963), Ford Foundation Visiting Research Professor of Economics (1974–1975), Professor of Economics (1975–1980), and John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor of Economics (since 1980)[128][129]
Robert Fogel 1993 Ford Foundation Visiting Research Professor (1963–1964), Associate Professor (1964–1965), and Professor (1965–1975; since 1981)[130][131]
Gary Becker 1992 M.A. (1953) and Ph.D. (1955); Assistant Professor of Economics (1954–1957) and Professor of Economics (1970–2014); also held appointments in the Department of Sociology (1984), Booth School of Business, and the Law School[132]
Ronald H. Coase 1991 Professor in the Department of Economics (1964–2013)[133]
Harry Markowitz 1990 Ph.B. in Liberal Arts (1947), M.A. in Economics (1950), and Ph.D. in Economics (1954)[134]
Merton H. Miller 1990 Professor at the Booth School of Business (1961–2000)[135]
Trygve Haavelmo 1989 Researcher at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics (1946–1947)[136]
James M. Buchanan 1986 Ph.D. (1948)[137]
Franco Modigliani 1985 Research Associate (1948–1949) and Research Consultant (1949–1952), Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics at the University of Chicago[138][139]
Gérard Debreu 1983 Research Associate at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics (1950–1955)[140]
George Stigler 1982 Ph.D. (1938); Professor (1958–1991)[141]
Lawrence R. Klein 1980 Researcher at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics (1944–1947); worked under the econometrics team[142][143][144]
Theodore W. Schultz 1979 Professor in the Department of Economics (1943–1998)[145]
Herbert A. Simon 1978 B.S. in Political Science (1937) and Ph.D. in Political Science (1943)[146]
Milton Friedman 1976 M.A. in Economics (1933); Research Assistant (1934–1935) and Professor (1946–1977)[147][148]
Tjalling C. Koopmans 1975 Research Associate (1944–1948) at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics, Associate Professor in the Department of Economics (1946–1948), and Director of Research of the Cowles Commission and Professor of Economics (1948–1955)[149]
Friedrich August von Hayek 1974 Professor of Social and Moral Science at the Committee on Social Thought (1950–1962)[150]
Kenneth J. Arrow 1972 Research Associate at the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics (partly) (1946–1949) and Assistant Professor of Economics (1948–1949)[151]
Paul Samuelson 1970 B.A. (1935)[152]

Nobel laureates in Literature[edit]

Name Year Affiliation with the University of Chicago
JM Coetzee 2003 Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought (1996–2003)[153]
Saul Bellow 1976 Undergraduate attendee (1933–1935), and professor at the Committee on Social Thought (1962–1993)[154]
Bertrand Russell 1950 Visiting Professor of Philosophy (1938–1939)[155][156]

Nobel Peace Prize laureates[edit]

Name Year Affiliation with the University of Chicago
Barack Obama 2009 Taught constitutional law at the University of Chicago Law School as a Lecturer (1992–1996) and as a Senior Lecturer (1996–2004)[157][158]
Emily Greene Balch 1946 Graduate attendee (studied sociology under Albion W. Small in 1895)[159][160]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Arthur H. Compton - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Kursunoglu, Behram N.; Wigner, Eugene P. (April 26, 1990). Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac: Reminiscences about a Great Physicist. Cambridge University Press. p. 132. ISBN 0521386888.
  3. ^ a b "Robert S. Mulliken - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  4. ^ "Alfred Nobel – The Man Behind the Nobel Prize". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  5. ^ "The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  6. ^ "Nobel Prize facts". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved September 29, 2019.
  7. ^ "Guide to the Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy. Records 1903-1922". University of Chicago Library. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  8. ^ a b "Joseph E. Stiglitz - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  9. ^ a b Aoki, Masahiko (2018). Transboundary Game of Life: Memoir of Masahiko Aoki. Springer. p. 59. ISBN 9811327572.
  10. ^ "Wolfgang Paul - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  11. ^ Whitney, Craig R. (December 9, 1993). "Dr. Wolfgang Paul, 80, Is Dead; German Winner of Physics Nobel". The New York Times. Retrieved October 2, 2019.
  12. ^ "Gerald M. Edelman - Curriculum Vitae". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  13. ^ GLASER, DONALD A. "Elementary particles and bubble chambers (Nobel Lecture)" (PDF). The Nobel Prize.
  14. ^ "THE BUBBLE CHAMBER, BIOENGINEERING, BUSINESS CONSULTING, AND NEUROBIOLOGY" (PDF). UC Berkeley.
  15. ^ Chicago, University of (1912). Announcements.
  16. ^ Jones, Sheilla (May 28, 2008). The Quantum Ten: A Story of Passion, Tragedy, Ambition, and Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 112. ISBN 0199740852.
  17. ^ Born, Max (May 9, 2014). My Life: Recollections of a Nobel Laureate. Routledge. p. 147. ISBN 1317699289.
  18. ^ "Max Born - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  19. ^ Regnery, Henry (July 1, 1985). Memoirs of a Dissident Publisher. Regnery Publishing. p. 56. ISBN 0895268027.
  20. ^ Kirk, Russell (April 22, 2014). Eliot and His Age: T. S. Eliot's Moral Imagination in the Twentieth Century. Open Road Media. ISBN 9781497635739.
  21. ^ Eliade, Mircea (1988). 1937-1960, Exile's Odyssey. University of Chicago Press. p. 192. ISBN 0226204111.
  22. ^ "Hermann J. Muller". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  23. ^ "Hermann J. Muller". manhattanprojectvoices.org. Retrieved March 4, 2018.
  24. ^ "Corneille Heymans - Biographical". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  25. ^ Jane Addams is listed as lecturer in the Extension Division of UChicago for several years (e.g. 1902, 1909, and 1912). For a copy of the syllabus of one of the courses delivered by Addams, see "Survivals and Intimations in Social Ethics," Ely Papers, Wisconsin State Historical Society, 1900. John C. Farrell noted the syllabus of another course in his footnotes, see Beloved Lady: A History of Jane Addams' Ideas on Reform and Peace (page 83); the title was "A Syllabus of a Course of Twelve Lectures, Democracy and Social Ethics."
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