List of Norwegian Premier League venues

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The Norwegian Premier League is the top association football league in Norway. It was established in 1963 as the First Division and has consisted of between 10 and 16 teams. Fifty-three different venues have been used to host matches.[1]

Current[edit]

The following is a list of all stadia used for matches in the Norwegian Premier League, including while it was known as the First Division. It consists of the venue's name, the municipality it where it is located, its current capacity, whether it has natural grass or artificial turf (an astrix (*) indicates current artificial turf, but previous natural grass), the number of top-league matches contested on the venue, the teams which have played their home games at the venue and how many matches for each team, and the years the stadium was used at the top level. The data is up to date as of the end of the 2013 season.

List of Norwegian Premier League stadiums
Name Location Capacity Surface Matches Tenant(s) Year(s) Ref(s)
Ullevaal Stadion Oslo 25,572 Natural 643 Lyn (267),[note 1] Vålerenga (240),[note 2] Skeid (114), Frigg (18), Stabæk (3),[note 3] Rosenborg (1)[note 4] 1963–75, 1977– [1][2][4]
Lerkendal Stadion Trondheim 21,850 Natural 577 Rosenborg (553), Strindheim (24)[note 5] 1967–77, 1979– [1][6][4]
Brann Stadion Bergen 17,317 Natural 530 Brann 1963–64, 1968–79, 1981, 1983, 1985, 1987– [1][7][4]
Åråsen Stadion Skedsmo 12,250 Natural 488 Lillestrøm (487), Strømmen (1)[note 6] 1975– [1][9][4]
Stavanger Stadion Stavanger 17,555 Natural 411 Viking 1963–65, 1968–86, 1989–2003 [1][10]
Bislett Stadion Oslo 15,400 Natural 376 Vålerenga (231),[note 7] Skeid (62), Frigg (56), Lyn (25), Stabæk (2) 1963–75, 1977–99 [1]
Alfheim Stadion Tromsø 7,599 Artificial* 331 Tromsø 1985, 1987–2001, 2003–13 [1][11][4]
Kristiansand Stadion Kristiansand 16,600 Natural 322 Start 1969, 1973–1987, 1989–96, 2000, 2002, 2005–06 [1][12]
Marienlyst Stadion Drammen 7,500 Artificial* 291 Strømsgodset 1967–76, 1990–91, 1994, 1996–99, 2001, 2007– [1][13][4]
Skagerak Arena[note 8] Skien 13,000 Artificial* 236 Odd Grenland 1965–67, 1999–2007, 2009– [1][15][4]
Aspmyra Stadion Bodø 7,354 Artificial* 235 Bodø/Glimt 1977–80, 1993–2005, 2008–09, 2014– [1][16]
Fosshaugane Campus Sogndal 4,000 Natural 232 Sogndal 1982, 1988–89, 1991–92, 1994, 1997–98, 2001–04, 2011– [1][17]
Molde Idrettspark[note 9] Molde 15,000 Natural 227 Molde 1974–78, 1980, 1982, 1984–93, 1995–97 [1][18]
Briskeby Arena Hamar 8,068 Artificial* 224 Hamarkameratene (223), Vålerenga (1)[note 10] 1970–74, 1976–77, 1979, 1981–84, 1986–87, 1992–95, 2004–06, 2008 [1][19]
Melløs Stadion Moss 10,085 Natural 220 Moss 1977–85, 1987–90, 1996, 1998–2002 [1][15]
Aker Stadion[note 11] Molde 11,167 Natural 215 Molde 1998–2006, 2008– [4]
Gjemselund Stadion Kongsvinger 5,000 Natural 212 Kongsvinger 1983–99, 2010 [1][21][4]
Old Fredrikstad Stadion[note 12] Fredrikstad 10,500 Natural 208 Fredrikstad 1963–73, 1975–76, 1981–82, 1984, 2004–06 [1][22]
Bryne Stadion Time 8,200 Natural 196 Bryne 1976–88, 2000–2003 [1][23]
Nadderud Stadion Bærum 7,000 Natural 182 Stabæk 1995–2004, 2006–2008, 2012, 2014– [1][12]
Nedre Eiker Stadion Nedre Eiker 4,500 Natural 151 Mjøndalen (143), Strømsgodset (8)[note 13] 1972–77, 1979, 1982–83, 1985–87, 1992, 1996 [1][25]
Viking Stadion Stavanger 16,300 Natural 140 Viking 2004– [4]
Sarpsborg Stadion Sarpsborg 4,900 Natural 133 Sarpsborg (118), Sarpsborg 08 (15)[note 14] 1963–72, 1974, 2011, 2013 [1][26]
Haugesund Stadion Haugesund 5,000 Natural 122 Haugesund (100), Djerv 1919 (11),[note 15] Vard Haugesund (11)[note 16] 1976, 1988, 1997–98, 2000, 2010– [1][11][23][27][4]
Color Line Stadion[note 17] Ålesund 10,778 Artificial 114 Aalesund 2005, 2007–
Sør Arena[note 18] Kristiansand 14,563 Natural 88 Start 2007, 2009–11, 2013– [4]
Høddvoll Stadion Ulsteinvik 4,433 Natural 60 Hødd 1966, 1969–72, 1995 [1][27]
Fredrikstad Stadion Fredrikstad 12,560 Natural 72 Fredrikstad 2007–09, 2011–12
Guldbergaunet Stadion Steinkjer 0 Natural 47 Steinkjer 1963, 1965–67, 1978 [1][5]
Aka Arena[note 19] Ringerike 4,256 Artificial 45 Hønefoss 2010, 2012–13
Telenor Arena[note 20] Bærum 15,000 Artificial 42 Stabæk 2009–11 [2][4]
Komplett.no Arena[note 21] Sandefjord 9,000 Natural 36 Sandefjord 2007, 2009–10 [28][29]
Tønsberg Gressbane Tønsberg 3,600 Natural 33 Eik-Tønsberg 1983–1985 [1][23]
Raufoss Stadion Vestre Toten 0 31 Raufoss 1964, 1973–74 [1][30]
Sandnes Idrettspark Sandnes 3,085 30 Sandnes Ulf 2012–
Narvik Stadion Narvik 0 22 Mjølner 1972, 1989 [1][31]
Strømmen Stadion Skedsmo 1,800 22 Strømmen 1986, 1988 [1][5]
Varden Amfi Bergen 12,000 22 Fyllingen 1990, 1993 [1][19][32]
Valhall Stadion Tromsø 0 20 Tromsø 1986–87 [1][33][34]
Storstadion Sandefjord 0 20 Sandefjord 2006–07 [28][29]
Sandefjord Stadion Sandefjord 0 18 Sandefjord BK 1964–65 [1][26]
Kråmyra Stadion Ålesund 9,665 13 Aalesund 2003
Voldsløkka Stadion Oslo 0 12 Skeid 1999 [1][35]
Krohnsminde Bergen 0 11 Fyllingen 1991 [1][32]
Kuventræ Stadion Os 0 11 Os 1975 [1][30]
Sakkestadbanen Haugesund 0 11 Haugar 1981 [1][27]
Gjøvik Stadion Gjøvik 0 9 Gjøvik/Lyn 1963 [1][19]
Lisleby Stadion Fredrikstad 0 9 Lisleby 1966 [1][9]
Pors Stadion Porsgrunn 0 9 Pors 1970 [1][30]
Nordlandshallen Bodø 5,500 Artificial 2 Bodø/Glimt 1993, 1997 [1][36][37]
Tromsdalen Stadion Tromsø 0 Artificial 2 Tromsø [1][38]
Aurland Stadion Aurland 0 Natural 1 Sogndal 1998 [1][39]
Grue Stadion Grue 0 Natural 1 Kongsvinger 1990 [1][40]

Future[edit]

List of Norwegian Premier League stadiums planned or under construction
Name Location Capacity Surface Matches Tenant(s) Year(s) Ref(s)
Valle Hovin Oslo 18,000 Artificial 0 Vålerenga [note 22] 2017– [1][41][4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lyn has had Ullevaal has it main home venue, and has played in the top league in 1963–69, 1971–73, 1978, 1980–81, 1991–93, 1997, 2001–09
  2. ^ Vålerenga has had Ullevaal as their main home ground in 1994–1996 and since 2000, although they prior to that often had a minority of their home games at Ullevaal, and were not in the top league in 2001
  3. ^ Stabæk played three matches at Ullevaal in 2010 while Telenor Arena was being used for the 2010 Eurovision Song Contest.[2]
  4. ^ Rosenborg played one matches at Ullevaal in 1971 due to severe rain fall ruining the pitch at their home ground Lerkendal Stadion ahead of the last home match against Strømsgodset.[3]
  5. ^ Strindheim played at Lerkendal in 1984 and 1995[5]
  6. ^ Strømmen played one match at Åråsen in 1986[8]
  7. ^ Vålerenga had Bislett as their main home stadium until 1993 and in 1998–99. In this period, they played in the top league in 1963–67, 1974–75, 1977–90 and 1998–99.
  8. ^ Skagerak Arena was known as Odd Stadion until 2007. For sponsorship reasons, the stadium is named for the power company Skagerak Energi.[14]
  9. ^ Molde Idrettspark was known as Molde Stadion until 1998, when Aker Stadion opened and took the name Molde Stadion
  10. ^ Vålerenga played one home match at Briskeby in 1984, a year Hamarkameratene was not in the top league
  11. ^ Aker Stadion was known as Molde Stadion until 3 May 2006. For sponsorship reasons, the stadium is named for the industrial conglomerate Aker.[20]
  12. ^ Old Fredrikstad Stadion was known as Fredrikstad Stadion until 2007, when a new Fredrikstad Stadion opened.
  13. ^ Strømsgodset played eight home games at Nedre Eiker Stadion in 1996, while Marienlyst was being renovated[24]
  14. ^ Sarpsborg 08 played at the top level in 2011 and 2013
  15. ^ Djerv 1919 played at the top level in 1976[23]
  16. ^ Vard Haugesund played at the top level in 1988[11]
  17. ^ For sponsorship reasons, Color Line Stadium is named for the ferry operator Color Line.
  18. ^ For sponsorship reasons, Sør Arena is named for the bank Sparebanken Sør.
  19. ^ For sponsorship reasons, Aka Arena is named for the investment company Aka.
  20. ^ For sponsorship reasons, Telenor Arena is named for the telecommunications company Telenor.
  21. ^ For sponsorship reasons, Komplett.no Arena is named for the online retailer Komplett.
  22. ^ Vålerenga will move to Valle Hovin in 2017

References[edit]

Bibliography
  • Fagerli, Arnfinn; Nilsen, Christian Lunde (1999). Norsk fotball-leksikon (in Norwegian). Orion. ISBN 82-458-0398-7. 
Notes
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 387
  2. ^ a b c "Jönsson: - Skremmende for oss". Troms Folkeblad (in Norwegian). 21 April 2010. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "Double-drømmen drukner i søle...!". Verdens Gang (in Norwegian). 9 October 1971. p. 25. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Løkken, Cathrine (4 February 2010). "Her skal det spilles eliteserie om 38 dager". Verdens Gang. Archived from the original on 28 November 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2011.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "capacity" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  5. ^ a b c Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 362
  6. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 358
  7. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 346
  8. ^ "Poeng til Strømmen" (in Norwegian). Norwegian News Agency. 10 August 1986. 
  9. ^ a b Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 352
  10. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 365
  11. ^ a b c Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 364
  12. ^ a b Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 361
  13. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 363
  14. ^ Aarre, Eivind (29 March 2007). "Viking åpner to nye arenaer". Stavanger Aftenblad (in Norwegian). p. 14. 
  15. ^ a b Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 356
  16. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 345
  17. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 360
  18. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 355
  19. ^ a b c Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 349
  20. ^ "Fra neste uke skifter nye". Bergens Tidende (in Norwegian). 29 April 2006. p. 31. 
  21. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 351
  22. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 348
  23. ^ a b c d Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 347
  24. ^ Johansen, Magne (13 April 1996). "Tilskuer-rekord? Én million på tribunene?". p. 38. 
  25. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 354
  26. ^ a b Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 359
  27. ^ a b c Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 350
  28. ^ a b "Terminliste". Alt om fotball. Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  29. ^ a b Kirkebøen, Stein Erik (21 July 2007). "Nesten komplett ferdig". Aftenposten (in Norwegian). Retrieved 23 November 2011. 
  30. ^ a b c Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 357
  31. ^ Fagerli and Lunde (1999): 353
  32. ^ a b Dehlin, Håkon (18 April 1991). "Foran seriestart Fyllingen på ny kurs". Aftenposten (in Norwegian). p. 35. 
  33. ^ "Tilskuer for tilskuer, år: 1986" (in Norwegian). Tromsø IL. 14 May 2003. Archived from the original on 1 December 2011. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  34. ^ "Tilskuer for tilskuer, år: 1987" (in Norwegian). Tromsø IL. 14 May 2003. Archived from the original on 1 December 2011. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  35. ^ Kirk Ebøen, Stein Erik (1 June 1999). "Ullevaal Stadion trenger en «lillebror» Vil kjøpe Voldsløkka". Aftenposten (in Norwegian). 
  36. ^ Johannessen, Bjørn Arne; Sandmoe, Thorleif (!6 October 1993). "Full vinter i idretts-Norge". Verdens Gang (in Norwegian). p. 42.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  37. ^ "Glimt mot Skeid inne" (in Norwegian). Norwegian News Agency. 17 October 1997. 
  38. ^ Overvik, Jostein (4 October 1998). "Tromsø Molde på kunstgress". Verdens Gang (in Norwegian). p. 38. 
  39. ^ Bugge, Mette (5 April 1998). "Seriestarten i fare på Marienlyst". Aftenposten (in Norwegian). p. 39. 
  40. ^ "Kongsvinger-kampen flyttet" (in Norwegian). Norwegian News Agency. 20 January 1990. 
  41. ^ Cite error: The named reference valle was invoked but never defined (see the help page).

See also[edit]