List of Oceanian Jews

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The vast majority of Jews in Oceania (estimation 120,000) live in Australia, with a population of about 7,000 in New Zealand (6867,[1] according to the 2013 NZ Census). Most are Ashkenazi Jews, with many being survivors of the Holocaust arriving during and after World War II. More recently, a significant number of Jews have arrived from South Africa and Russia. The official number of people who practised Judaism in the 2001 census was only 83,459 but this number is expected to be much higher, as it did not count those overseas (i.e. dual Australian-Israeli nationals) or many non-practicing Jews who prefer not to disclose religion in the census are more common. Ironically, ever since the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, Australia's Jewish population has hovered around 0.5% of the total counted.

The vast majority of Australia's Jews live in inner suburbs of Melbourne and Sydney with smaller populations, in numerical order, in Perth, Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Adelaide. Currently, there are also recognised communities in Ballarat, Bendigo/Castlemaine, Canberra, Geelong, Gosford, Hobart, Launceston and Newcastle.

In Melbourne, the Jewish population centre is Caulfield where there are streets with nearly a 100% Jewish population; the main areas of settlement spread out from Caulfield in two arcs: south through St Kilda, Elwood, Elsternwick, Brighton, Moorabbin and right down to Frankston; east through Toorak, Malvern, Hawthorn, Kew, Balwyn to Doncaster. In Sydney the major areas of Jewish settlement are in the east and on the North Shore, in particular the suburbs of Bondi, Dover Heights, Rose Bay, Vaucluse, St Ives and Hunters Hill.

In New Zealand, most Jews live in Auckland and Wellington with smaller populations in Dunedin and Christchurch. Dunedin synagogue has possibly the world's southernmost Jewish congregation.[2]

The following is a list of prominent Oceanian Jews, arranged by country of origin.

Australia[edit]

Academic figures[edit]

Business figures[edit]

Cultural figures[edit]

Political figures[edit]

National figures

Local body politicians

Religious figures[edit]

Sports figures[edit]

Miscellaneous[edit]

  • Dunera boys, a group of mainly Jewish British detainees who were deported to Australia in horrific circumstances; many of them later becoming prominent Australian citizens
  • Sir John Monash, World War I general, engineer, first chairman of Victoria's State Electricity Commission
  • Ikey Solomon, First Fleet prisoner, the person on whom Charles Dickens based the character of Fagin

French Polynesia[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Business figures[edit]

Cultural figures[edit]

Political figures[edit]

National figures

Local body politicians

Religious figures[edit]

Sports figures[edit]

Other figures[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Religious Affiliation (total response)". 2013 Census Data – QuickStats About Culture and Identity – Tables. 2013. Table 31. 
  2. ^ Jews in New Zealand
  3. ^ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  4. ^ "Bernard Boas". AustLit. (subscription required)
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  6. ^ "The structural sufficiency of domestic buildings / by David V. Isaacs". National Library of Australia. 
  7. ^ "Phillip Isaacs OAM". LinkedIn. 
  8. ^ "Joseph Jacobs" Northern State University, Aberdeen, S.D.
  9. ^ "The Hon. William Kaye AO QC - obituary". Chaim Freedman. 
  10. ^ "About Professor Julius Stone". University of Sydney. 
  11. ^ "From labour camp to Family Court judge: Steven Strauss, 1921-2010". The Sydney Morning Herald. 7 August 2010. 
  12. ^ Prime Minister of Australia[dead link]
  13. ^ "Nothing Is Impossible: the John Saunders story Gabriel Kune [Foreword by John Howard, PM]". Archived from the original on 14 February 2006. 
  14. ^ ENOUGH ROPE with Andrew Denton – episode 73: Geraldine Brooks (18/04/2005)
  15. ^ Tom Hyland (23 August 2009). "The return of the Sensible Jew". The Sydney Morning Herald. 
  16. ^ "Linda Phillips : composer, performer, critic and adjudicator - A centenary retrospective". QUT ePrints. 
  17. ^ Albrecht Dümling (20 September 2011). "Uncovering Traces: German-speaking refugee musicians in Australia". Resonate magazine. 
  18. ^ Weston Bate. "Spielvogel, Nathan Frederick (1874–1956)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  19. ^ J. S. Levi. "Abrahams, Joseph (1855–1938)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  20. ^ Hilary L. Rubinstein. "Blaubaum, Elias (1847–1904)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  21. ^ Louise Rosenberg. "Boas, Abraham Tobias (1842–1923)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  22. ^ Suzanne D. Rutland. "Cohen, Francis Lyon (1862–1934)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  23. ^ G. F. J. Bergman. "Davis, Alexander Barnard (1828–1913)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  24. ^ John Levi, Rabbi Jacob Danglow: The Uncrowned Monarch of Australia's Jews, 1995, Melbourne University Publishing.
  25. ^ Newman Rosenthal, Look Back with Pride: the St. Kilda Hebrew Congregation's first century, 1971, T. Nelson, Melbourne.
  26. ^ J. S. Levi. "Danglow, Jacob (1880–1962)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  27. ^ O. B. Tofler. "Freedman, David Isaac (1874–1939)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  28. ^ "Rabbi Freilich OAM". P{erth Hebrew Congregation. 
  29. ^ "Rabbi Genende". Caulfield Hebrew Congregation. 
  30. ^ "Rabbi LM Goldman – a profile". OzTorah. 
  31. ^ "Past Rabbis". St Kilda Hebrew Congregation. 
  32. ^ Eliot Baskin, Werner Graff, Malcolm Turnbull, A Time to Keep:The story of Temple Beth Israel 1930 to 2005, 2005, Hybrid Publishers, Melbourne.
  33. ^ "Our Rabbis". Temple Beth Israel, Victoria. 
  34. ^ "Obituary – Rabbi Ronald Lubofsky AM". Oz Torah. 
  35. ^ Eliot Baskin, Werner Graff, Malcolm Turnbull, A Time to Keep:The story of Temple Beth Israel 1930 to 2005, 2005, Hybrid Publishers, Melbourne.
  36. ^ "Australian Jewry Excited at Rabbi Mark's Plans to Form Liberal Jewish Organization". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. 29 September 1930. 
  37. ^ Morris S. Ochert OAM. "Queensland Jewish History". Jewish QLD. 
  38. ^ Eliot Baskin, Werner Graff, Malcolm Turnbull, A Time to Keep:The story of Temple Beth Israel 1930 to 2005, 2005, Hybrid Publishers, Melbourne.
  39. ^ "Our History". Temple Beth Israel, Victoria. 
  40. ^ Suzanne D. Rutland. "Porush, Israel (1907–1991)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  41. ^ John Levi, My Dear Friends, 2009, Australian Jewish Historical Society, Melbourne.
  42. ^ Eliot Baskin, Werner Graff, Malcolm Turnbull, A Time to Keep:The story of Temple Beth Israel 1930 to 2005, 2005, Hybrid Publishers, Melbourne.
  43. ^ by J. S. Levi. "Sanger, Herman Max (1909–1980)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. 
  44. ^ "Our History". Emanuel Synagogue, Woollahra, NSW. 
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k New Zealand, Jewish Virtual Library.
  46. ^ "Hallenstein, Bendix". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  47. ^ "Michael Hirschfeld Gallery Honours Staunch Friend of the Arts", City Gallery, Wellington.
  48. ^ "Levin, William Hort". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  49. ^ "Montefiore, John Israel". Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  50. ^ a b c d "Jews". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  51. ^ "de Beer, Esmond Samuel". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  52. ^ Gina Bellman, tv.com.
  53. ^ Brasch, Charles Orwell] The Encyclopedia of New Zealand
  54. ^ Jewornotjew.com
  55. ^ Cleave, Louisa (7 February 2002). "Obituary: Angela D'Audney". The New Zealand Herald. 
  56. ^ "Fels, Willi". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  57. ^ The Richard Fuchs archive
  58. ^ "Joel, Grace Jane". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  59. ^ "Inside the minds of animals", Mindpowernews.com.
  60. ^ "Baume, Frederick Ehrenfried". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  61. ^ Levine, S. (1999) The New Zealand Jewish community. Lanham, Md: Lexington Books (Google books), p. 22.
  62. ^ "Former Chief Justices", Courts of New Zealand.
  63. ^ Berry, Ruth (25 November 2006). "Will the real John Key step forward". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 27 November 2006. My mother was Jewish which technically makes me Jewish. [dead link]
  64. ^ "Davis, Ernest Hyam". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  65. ^ "Robinson, Dove-Myer". Te Ara, The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. 
  66. ^ Goldman, L. M. (1958). "Chapter XX – Jews in Industry and Commerce". The History of the Jews in New Zealand. Wellington: Reed Publishing (NZ) Ltd. p. 147.
  67. ^ a b Temple Sinai, NZ Jewish archives.
  68. ^ "Goldstein, Samuel Aaron: Biography". Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 15 April 2017. 
  69. ^ "Astor, Alexander: Biography". Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 15 April 2017. 
  70. ^ "Raisman, Down Under athletes soar among Jewish Olympians", Jewish Telegraphic Agency
  71. ^ "New Zealand Jewish rower Nathan Cohen wins Olympic gold". Jewish Journal. Jewish Telegraphic Agency. August 3, 2012. 
  72. ^ Bob Wechsler (2008). Day by day in Jewish Sports History. KTAV Publishing House. ISBN 1-60280-013-8. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  73. ^ "Herald New Zealander of the Year: Dr Peter Gluckman". New Zealand Herald. 18 December 2004. 
  74. ^ NZ Jewish Archive
  75. ^ Harvey, Ross. "Phineas Selig". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 4 May 2017. 

External links[edit]