List of PSA engines

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The PSA Group (Peugeot/Citroën) sells a variety of automobile engines. Later HDi engines are built as part of a joint-venture with Ford Motor Company.

DK[edit]

The DK is a family of inline-four diesel engines:

Douvrin[edit]

The Douvrin family, formally called ZDJ/ZEJ, or "J6R/J7T" was an all-aluminum inline-four engine made in a joint-venture between Peugeot, Renault and Volvo in the 1970s through the 1990s. * Volvo used in the 2.0L version in the 440BK. ** AMC Eagle also fitted version with a BENDIX ECU to the '88-'89 Eagle Medallion, 2.0L.


     2.1L (2068 cc) diesel and turbo-diesel - as used in the '85-'87 AMC Jeep Cherokee/Comanche and '83-'92 Winnebago Lesharo/Itasca Phasar.  

NOTE: Although not commonly referred to as a "Douvrin;" the larger 6 Cyl engine was also built in the Peugeot factory in Douvrin, France... this version was used far longer by Volvo that the other mfrs and is commonly referred to as a "PRV" -Peugeot, Renault, Volvo. The famous DeLorean DMC-12, Eagle Premier, early 1990s Dodge Monaco, Renault Alpine, as well as the Peugeot 505/604 all were fitted with the "PRV."

DT[edit]

The DT is a family of diesel V6 engines shared between the PSA Group, Jaguar Land Rover and Ford Motor Company (where it is called AJD-V6).

  • DT17 — 2.7 L (2,720 cc)
  • DT20 — 3.0 L (2,993 cc)

DV[edit]

The DV is a family of diesel inline-four engines shared between the PSA Group and Ford Motor Company (where it is called DLD).

  • DV4 — 1.4 L (1,399 cc)
  • DV5 — 1.5 L (1,496 cc)
  • DV6 — 1.6 L (1,560 cc)

EB[edit]

The EB is a family of Inline-three gasoline engines. EB is also known commercially as PureTech engine:

  • EB0 — 1.0 L (988.9 cc) Euro 5 50 kW
  • EB2 — 1.2 L (1,199.9 cc) Euro 6 61 kW
  • EB2DT — 1.2 L (1,199.9 cc) turbo Euro 6 81 kW
  • EB2DTS — 1.2 L (1,199.9 cc) turbo Euro 6 96 kW
  • EB2ADTS — 1.2 L (1,199.9 cc) turbo Euro 6 100 kW
  • EB2ADTX — 1.2 L (1,199.9 cc) turbo Euro 6 115 kW

Applications:

EC[edit]

EC engines are an evolution of the TU family for China, North Africa and Latin America. They will appear in 2012 and will be used in cars such as Peugeot 301 and Citroën C-Elysée.

  • EC5 — 1.6 L 115 PS (85 kW; 113 hp).
  • EC8 — 1.8 L 136 PS (100 kW; 134 hp).

ES[edit]

The ES family is a 60° DOHC 24 valve V6 engine. It replaced the PRV engine in 1997.

  • ES9 — 2.9 L (2,946 cc)

EW/DW[edit]

The EW/DW is a family of inline-four gasoline and diesel engines:

  • EW7 — 1.8 L (1,749 cc)
  • EW10 — 2.0 L (1,997 cc)
  • EW12 — 2.2 L (2,231 cc)
  • DW8 — 1.9 L (1,868 cc)
  • DW10 — 2.0 L (1,997 cc) turbo
  • DW12 — 2.2 L (2,179 cc) turbo

Prince[edit]

The Prince is a family of inline-four gasoline engines designed by BMW and PSA. It replaced the TU line.

Engines:

  • EP3 — 1.4 L (1,360 cc) Euro 4 70-72 kW
  • EP3C — 1.4 L (1,360 cc) Euro 5 70-72 kW
  • EP6 — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 4 72-88 kW
  • EP6C — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 5 72-88 kW
  • EP6DT — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 4 103-120 kW
  • EP6CDT — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 5 103-120 kW
  • EP6DTS — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 4 128-152 kW
  • EP6CDTS — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 5 135 kW
  • EP6CDTX — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 5 147 kW
  • EP6FDTR — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 6 200 kW
  • EP6FADTX — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 6.2 164 kW
  • EP6FADTR — 1.6 L (1,598 cc) Euro 6.2 199 kW

PRV[edit]

The PRV was a shared 90° SOHC V6 engine, with later SOHC 24-valve and turbocharged additions. The PRV was shared between Peugeot, Renault, and Volvo Cars, thus the "PRV" name. It was produced from 1974 until it was phased out in favor of the PSA ES engine in 1998. PSA codenamed it the Z series internally.

  • ZM — 2.7 L (2,664 cc)
  • ZN — 2.9 L (2,849 cc)
  • ZP — 3.0 L (2,975 cc)

TM/TN[edit]

The TM and TN was a family of inline-four petrol engines used in the Peugeot 202, 203 and 403:

Model Displacement Compression Output
TM 1.3 L (1,290 cc) 6.8:1-7.1:1 42-45 PS
TM5 1.3 L (1,290 cc) 7.3:1 54 PS
TN3 1.5 L (1,468 cc) 7.3:1 58 PS

TMD[edit]

The TMD was a family of inline-four Diesel engines produced by Indenor used in the Peugeot 403 and J9:

Model Displacement Compression Output
TMD80 1.6 L (1,608 cc) 21:1 38 PS
TMD85 1.8 L (1,816 cc) 21:1 48 PS

TU[edit]

The TU is a family of inline-four gasoline engines of varying displacements:

  • TU9 — 1.0 L (954 cc)
  • TU1 — 1.1 L (1,124 cc)
  • TU2 — 1.3 L (1,294 cc)
  • TU3 — 1.4 L (1,361 cc)
  • TU5 — 1.6 L (1,587 cc)

TUD[edit]

The TUD is a family of inline-four Diesel engines:

  • TUD3 — 1.4 L (1,360 cc)
  • TUD5 — 1.5 L (1,527 cc)

X[edit]

The X family was a group of SOHC inline-four engines for supermini cars, notable for its integral transmission design (which lent it its common nickname the "suitcase engine"), and that it was designed for near horizontal installation. It was produced from 1972 through 1988, when it was replaced by the PSA TU engine.

  • XV — 1.0 L (954 cc)
  • XW — 1.1 L (1,124 cc)
  • XZ — 1.2 L (1,219 cc)
  • XY — 1.4 L (1,361 cc)

XB[edit]

The XB is a family of inline-four gasoline engines:

  • XB2 — 1.5 L (1,468 cc)
  • XB5 — 1.5 L (1,468 cc)

XC[edit]

The XC was a family of inline-four gasoline engines primarily used in the Peugeot 404:

Model Displacement Compression Output notes
XC5 1.6 L (1,618 cc) 72-76 PS
XC6 1.6 L (1,618 cc) 72 PS
XC7 1.6 L (1,618 cc) 70 PS
XCKF1 1.6 L (1,618 cc) 85 PS Kugelfischer mechanical fuel injection
XCKF2 1.6 L (1,618 cc) 96 PS Kugelfischer mechanical fuel injection

XD[edit]

The XD was a family of inline-four diesel engines designed by Indenor [fr]:

  • XD75
  • XD80 — 1.6 L (1,608 cc)
  • XD85 — 1.8 L (1,816 cc)
  • XD88 — 1.9 L (1,948 cc)
  • XD90 — 2.1 L (2,112 cc)
  • XD2 — 2.3 L (2,304 cc)
  • XD2S — 2.3 L (2,304 cc), turbocharged
  • XD3 — 2.5 L (2,498 cc)
  • XD3T — 2.5 L (2,498 cc), turbocharged
  • XD3TE — 2.5 L (2,498 cc), turbocharged with intercooler

XK/XL/XR[edit]

XR5 engine in 1982 Peugeot 305 GR

The XK was an all-new inline-four engine developed for Peugeot's new 204, their first front-wheel drive car. The engine is made from aluminium and has removable cylinder liners. The engine had a distinctive design; the gearbox and differential were located directly below the engine block. This design helped Peugeot produce its first front-wheel-drive car. The original XK had an 1,130 cc displacement; later the 1.3 liter XL engine appeared and then the 1.5 liter XR series which was developed specifically for the 305. There were also diesel engines developed; the 1,255 cc XLD and the 1,357 cc XL4D. In 1979 the XID appeared, with 1,548 cc this version shared many parts with the XR petrol engine.

Both the original XK and the larger XL underwent major changes around the end of 1975, receiving shorter strokes and wider bores which ended up resulting in nearly the same displacement and with very similar outputs, albeit with lower torque.

  • XK — 1.1 L (1,130 cc), 53 PS (39 kW), Peugeot 204, 1965-1969
  • XK4 — 1.1 L (1,130 cc), 55 PS (40 kW), Peugeot 204, 1969-1976
  • XK5 — 1.1 L (1,127 cc), 59 PS (43 kW), Peugeot 204 and 304 GL Break/Fourgonette, 1975-1980
  • XL3 — 1.3 L (1,288 cc), Peugeot 304, 1969-1976
  • XL3S — 1.3 L (1,288 cc) twin carbs, Peugeot 304 S, 1972-1976
  • XL5 — 1.3 L (1,290 cc), Peugeot 304 and 305, 1976-1986
  • XL5S — 1.3 L (1,290 cc) twin carbs, Peugeot 304 SLS, 1976-1978
  • XR5 — 1.5 L (1,472 cc), Peugeot 305, 1977-1983
  • XR5S — 1.5 L (1,472 cc) twin carbs, Peugeot 305 S, 1980-1982
  • XLD — 1.25 L (1,255 cc) diesel, Peugeot 204 Break/Fourgonette, 1968-1973
  • XL4D — 1.4 L (1,357 cc) diesel, Peugeot 204 and 304, 1973-1979
  • XID/XIDL — 1.55 L (1,548 cc) diesel, Peugeot 304 and 305, 1979-1982

XM[edit]

The XM was a family of inline-four gasoline engines produced from 1968 to 1990. These engines had an OHV design valvetrain, with two valves per cylinder. Bore and stroke were 84 mm and 81 mm, respectively.[1] They were carbureted and later were offered with mechanical fuel injection. The versions available were:

  • XM — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)
  • XMKF5 — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)
  • XMKF6 — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)
  • XM7 — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)
  • XM7A — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)
  • XM7P — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)
  • XM7T — 1.8 L (1,796 cc)

The XM engines were used in the Peugeot 404 (South Africa), Peugeot 504 and Peugeot 505, as well as the Peugeot J7 and Peugeot J5 vans.


XN[edit]

XN2 injection engine in a 1983 504 Cabriolet

The XN was a family of inline-four gasoline engines closely related to the smaller XM-series, used mainly in the Peugeot 504 and 505 family cars but in certain other vehicles as well. These engines have an OHV design valvetrain, with two valves per cylinder. Bore and stroke are 88 mm and 81 mm, respectively.:

  • XN1 — 2.0 L (1,971 cc)
  • XN2 — 2.0 L (1,971 cc). Fuel injected, 106 PS (78 kW) at 5,200 rpm and 169 N⋅m (125 lb⋅ft) at 3,000 rpm. Equipped with Kugelfischer mechanical fuel injection, the XN2 was fitted to 504 TI and 504 Coupé/Cabriolets.[2]
  • XN6 — 2.0 L (1,971 cc). This engine had electronic fuel injection and 96 PS (71 kW). It was only fitted to the four-cylinder 604 SR, a car only sold to French governmental agencies. The XN6 was also used in North American market 504s and 505s between model years 1980 and 1987.[3]
  • XN8 — 2.0 L (1,971 cc), for the Peugeot P4 only[4]

XU[edit]

The XU is a family of inline-four gasoline engines:

  • XU5 — 1.6 L (1580 cc)
  • XU7 — 1.8 L (1761 cc)
  • XU8 — 1.8 L (1775 cc)
  • XU9 — 1.9 L (1905 cc)
  • XU10 — 2.0 L (1998 cc)

XUD[edit]

The XUD is a family of inline-four diesel engines:

  • XUD7 — 1.8 L (1,769 cc)
  • XUD9 — 1.9 L (1,905 cc)
  • XUD11 — 2.1 L (2,088 cc) or 2.1 L (2,138 cc)

References[edit]

  1. ^ cars-data.com. "Peugeot 505 SX 1.8 Specifications". Archived from the original on 2011-07-08. Retrieved 2010-07-15.
  2. ^ Büschi, Hans-Ulrich, ed. (March 10, 1983). "Automobil Revue '83" (in German and French). 78. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag, AG: 443. ISBN 3-444-06065-3. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. ^ Flammang, James M. (1994). Standard Catalog of Imported Cars, 1946-1990. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc. pp. 496–499. ISBN 0-87341-158-7.
  4. ^ "Caracteristiques VLTT Peugeot P4". gmlpassion.com. Retrieved 2007-07-03.