List of Pac-12 Conference national championships

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The following is a list of current Pac-12 Conference members' NCAA and AIAW championships. Current Pac-12 members have won 482 NCAA national championships (As of December 23, 2015). Since the 1999-2000 academic year, the Pac-12 claims a total of 131 NCAA team titles, including 10 in 2013-2014. They have also led or tied the nation in NCAA Championships in 48 of the last 54 years, the only exceptions being in 1980-81, 1988-89, 1990-91 and 1995-96 when the conference finished second, and finished third in 1998-99 and 2004-2005.

This list also includes championships won by current Pac-12 schools while members of the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC), a closely related league that was formed in 1916 and disbanded in 1959. Although the current charter of what is now known as the Pac-12 dates only to the formation of the Athletic Association of Western Universities immediately after the demise of the PCC, the Pac-12 claims the PCC's history as its own. There is considerable continuity between the PCC and Pac-12—eight of the nine final members of the PCC (all except Idaho) are now Pac-12 members; five of these schools had founded the AAWU, and all eight had joined the AAWU by the 1964–65 school year.

Current members[edit]

Institution Location Nickname NCAA Team
Championships
(through March 12, 2016)[1]
University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona Wildcats 18
Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona Sun Devils 23
University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, California Golden Bears 34
University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, California Bruins 113
University of Colorado Boulder Boulder, Colorado Buffaloes 28
University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon Ducks 30
Oregon State University Corvallis, Oregon Beavers 3
University of Southern California Los Angeles, California Trojans 100
Stanford University Stanford, California Cardinal 108
University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Utes 20
University of Washington Seattle, Washington Huskies 6
Washington State University Pullman, Washington Cougars 2

Fall Sports[edit]

Men's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference, or an independent.

  • Oregon State was not initially invited to join the AAWU upon its 1959 formation. It played as an independent until joining the AAWU in 1964.
  • Colorado won its pre-2013 men's cross country titles as a member of the Big 12 Conference.
  • Colorado won its 1990 football title (AP) as a member of the Big Eight Conference.

† The NCAA does not officially declare football national championships. Various polls, formulas, and other third-party systems have been used to determine national championships, not all of which are universally accepted. The various polls were often not unanimous, resulting in more than one team sharing a title, and mathematical systems were sometimes applied retroactively to determine championships. Furthermore, schools determined by one or more selectors as champions, do not necessarily claim the title.

  • Italics indicate retroactive or minor selector.
  • USC claims 11 national football championships,[2] California claims 5,[3][4] Arizona State, Stanford and Washington each claim 2,[5][6] and Colorado and UCLA each claim 1 championship.[7][8][9][10]

Women's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference.

  • The conference now known as the Pac-12 did not sponsor women's sports until the 1986–87 school year, when it was known as the Pacific-10 Conference. Oregon won its 1983 women's cross country title as a member of the Northern Pacific Conference, while USC in 1981 and UCLA in 1984 won women's volleyball titles as members of the Western Collegiate Athletic Association.
  • Colorado won both of its women's cross country championships as a member of the Big 12 Conference.

Winter Sports[edit]

Men's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference.

Women's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference.

Spring Sports[edit]

Men's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference.

  • Oregon was not initially invited to join the AAWU on its formation in 1959. It won its 1962 and 1964 men's outdoor track and field titles as an independent; it did not join the AAWU until the 1964–65 school year.
  • All national titles in baseball and men's outdoor track and field won by Arizona and Arizona State prior to the 1978–79 school year were won while the two schools were in the Western Athletic Conference.

Women's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference.

  • As noted previously, the then-Pac-10 did not sponsor women's sports until 1986–87.
    • UCLA: Three national championships in softball (1982, 1984, 1985) and two in women's outdoor track and field (1982, 1983) were won as a member of the Western Collegiate Athletic Association (WCAA).
    • Stanford: Three national championships in women's tennis (1982, 1984, 1986) were won as a member of the WCAA (known as the Pacific West Conference in the 1985–86 school year).
    • USC: Two national championships in women's tennis (1983, 1985) were won as a member of the WCAA.
    • Oregon: One national championship in women's track and field (1985) was won as a member of the Northern Pacific Conference.

Other NCAA championships[edit]

The following are NCAA championships won by Pac-12 members but in sports not sponsored by the Pac-12

Men's Sports[edit]

* Won while a member of another conference.

  • All of Colorado's championships in men's skiing between 1959 and 1982 were won as a full member of the Big Eight Conference, which never sponsored skiing in its history.
  • Utah's 1981 men's skiing title was won as a full member of the Western Athletic Conference, which like the Pac-12 has never sponsored skiing.

Women's Sports[edit]

Water Polo (15)
Year School
2001 UCLA
2002 Stanford
2003 UCLA
2004 USC
2005 UCLA
2006 UCLA
2007 UCLA
2008 UCLA
2009 UCLA
2010 USC
2011 Stanford
2012 Stanford
2013 USC
2014 Stanford
2015 Stanford

Combined Sports[edit]

Skiing (16)
Year School
1983 Utah*
1984 Utah*
1986 Utah*
1987 Utah*
1988 Utah*
1991 Colorado*
1993 Utah*
1995 Colorado*
1996 Utah*
1997 Utah*
1998 Colorado*
1999 Colorado*
2003 Utah*
2006 Colorado*
2011 Colorado*
2013 Colorado
2015 Colorado

* Won while a member of another conference.

  • Utah: Championships between 1983 and 1997 won as a full member of the Western Athletic Conference, and 2003 championship won as a full member of the Mountain West Conference. Neither conference has ever sponsored skiing.
  • Colorado: Championships in 1991 and 1995 won as a full member of the Big Eight Conference, and championships between 1998 and 2011 won as a full member of the Big 12 Conference. The Big Eight never sponsored skiing before its demise in 1996, and the Big 12 has never sponsored the sport.

AIAW national championships[edit]

Institution Nickname Total AIAW titles
Arizona State University Sun Devils 12
University of California, Los Angeles Bruins 8
University of Southern California Trojans 6
University of Utah Utes 4[a]
University of Arizona Wildcats 2
Stanford University Cardinal 2
University of Colorado Buffaloes 1
University of Washington Huskies 1

Mary Budke of Oregon State won the 1974 AIAW individual collegiate golf national championship.

  1. ^ Includes Utah's one cross-country national championship, which was won at the AIAW Division II level.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Championships History" (PDF). Retrieved January 26, 2015. 
  2. ^ USC Sports Information Office (2008). 2008 USC Football Media Guide (PDF). University of Southern California. pp. 119–124. Retrieved 2009-06-14. 
  3. ^ "CalBears.com – Traditions: Cal National Team Champions". University of California Department of Athletics. Retrieved 2009-06-14. 
  4. ^ Benenson, Herb, ed. (2008). 2008 California Football Media Guide (PDF). Cal Media Relations Office. p. 36. Retrieved 2009-06-15. 
  5. ^ Kilwien, Richard; Bechthold, Jeff; Morry, Nicole; Soriano, Jonathan; McLeod, Brianna (2010). Washington Huskies 2010 Football Record Book (PDF). University of Washington Athletic Communications Office. p. 1. Retrieved 2010-06-24. 
  6. ^ Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book (PDF). Indianapolis, IN: National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. pp. 76–77, 81. Retrieved 2011-09-18. 
  7. ^ "Stanford Official Athletic Site – Traditions: Stanford Cardinal Championships". Stanford University Department of Athletics. Retrieved 2009-06-16. 
  8. ^ Young, Jim, ed. (2009). 2009 Stanford Football Media Guide (PDF). Stanford University Athletic Communications and Media Relations Department. pp. 141, 144. Retrieved 2009-10-17. 
  9. ^ Dellins, Marc, ed. (2009). 2009 UCLA Football Media Guide (PDF). UCLA Sports Information Office. pp. 147, 154, 164. Retrieved 2009-10-16. 
  10. ^ COLORADO FOOTBALL 1990 NATIONAL CHAMPIONS, University of Colorado Athletic Department, 2011, retrieved 2011-07-03