List of Parliamentary constituencies in Hampshire

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The ceremonial county of Hampshire, which includes the unitary authorities of Portsmouth and Southampton, is divided into 18 Parliamentary constituencies - 9 Borough constituencies and 9 County constituencies.

Constituencies[edit]

  Conservative   Labour   Liberal Democrat ¤

Constituency[nb 1] Electorate[1] Majority[2][nb 2] Member of Parliament[2] Nearest opposition[2] Map
Aldershot BC 72,617 16,698   Leo Docherty   Howard Kaye ‡
Basingstoke BC 82,928 14,198   Maria Miller   Kerena Marchant ‡
East Hampshire CC 76,478 19,696   Damian Hinds   David Buxton ¤
Eastleigh BC 83,880 15,607   Paul Holmes   Lynda Murphy ¤
Fareham CC 78,337 26,086   Suella Braverman   Matthew Randall ‡
Gosport BC 73,541 23,278   Caroline Dinenage   Tom Chatwin ‡
Havant BC 72,103 21,792   Alan Mak   Rosamund Knight ‡
Meon Valley CC 75,737 23,555   Flick Drummond   Lewis North ¤
New Forest East CC 73,549 25,251   Julian Lewis   Julie Hope ‡
New Forest West CC 70,869 24,403   Desmond Swayne   Jack Davies ¤
North East Hampshire CC 78,954 20,211   Ranil Jayawardena   Graham Cockarill ¤
North West Hampshire CC 83,083 26,308   Kit Malthouse   Luigi Gregori ¤
Portsmouth North BC 71,299 15,780   Penny Mordaunt   Amanda Martin ‡
Portsmouth South BC* 74,186 5,363   Stephen Morgan   Donna Jones †
Romsey and Southampton North CC 68,228 10,872   Caroline Nokes   Craig Fletcher ¤
Southampton Itchen BC 72,299 4,498   Royston Smith   Simon Letts ‡
Southampton Test BC 70,116 6,213   Alan Whitehead   Steven Galton †
Winchester CC 75,582 985   Steve Brine   Paula Ferguson ¤

Boundary changes[edit]

The Boundary Commission for England recommended that the county be divided into 18 constituencies. The proposed Aldershot and Basingstoke seats, more predominantly urban than as present defined, will be designated borough constituencies. These changes were implemented at the 2010 United Kingdom general election.

Name Pre-2010 boundaries
  1. Aldershot CC
  2. Basingstoke CC
  3. East Hampshire CC
  4. Eastleigh BC
  5. Fareham CC
  6. Gosport BC
  7. Havant BC
  8. New Forest East CC
  9. New Forest West CC
  10. North East Hampshire CC
  11. North West Hampshire CC
  12. Portsmouth North BC
  13. Portsmouth South BC
  14. Romsey CC
  15. Southampton Itchen BC
  16. Southampton Test BC
  17. Winchester CC
Parliamentary constituencies in Hampshire
Proposed name Current boundaries
  1. Aldershot BC
  2. Basingstoke BC
  3. East Hampshire CC
  4. Eastleigh BC
  5. Fareham CC
  6. Gosport BC
  7. Havant BC
  8. Meon Valley CC
  9. New Forest East CC
  10. New Forest West CC
  11. North East Hampshire CC
  12. North West Hampshire CC
  13. Portsmouth North BC
  14. Portsmouth South BC
  15. Romsey and Southampton North CC
  16. Southampton Itchen BC
  17. Southampton Test BC
  18. Winchester CC
Proposed Revised constituencies in Hampshire

Proposed boundary changes[edit]

The Boundary Commission for England submitted their final proposals in respect of the Sixth Periodic Review of Westminster Constituencies (the 2018 review) in September 2018. Although the proposals were immediately laid before Parliament they were not brought forward by the Government for approval. Accordingly, they did not come into effect for the 2019 election which took place on 12 December 2019, and which was contested using the constituency boundaries in place since 2010.

Under the terms of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011, the Sixth Review was based on reducing the total number of MPs from 650 to 600 and a strict electoral parity requirement that the electorate of all constituencies should be within a range of 5% either side of the electoral quota.

On 24 March 2020, the Minister of State for the Cabinet Office, Chloe Smith, issued a written statement to Parliament setting out the Government's thinking with regard to parliamentary boundaries. They propose to bring forward primary legislation to remove the statutory obligation to implement the 2018 Boundary Review recommendations, as well as set the framework for future boundary reviews in time for the next review which is due to begin in early 2021 and report no later than October 2023. It is proposed that the number of constituencies now remains at the current level of 650, rather than being reduced to 600, while retaining the requirement that the electorate should be no more than +/- 5% from the electoral quota.[3]

Results history[edit]

Primary data source: House of Commons research briefing - General election results from 1918 to 2019[4]

2019[edit]

The number of votes cast for each political party who fielded candidates in constituencies comprising Hampshire in the 2019 general election were as follows:

Party Votes % Change from 2017 Seats Change from 2017
Conservative 536,633 57.1% Increase0.5% 16 0
Labour 188,738 20.1% Decrease6.5% 2 0
Liberal Democrats 175,173 18.6% Increase6.4% 0 0
Greens 30,710 3.3% Increase1.3% 0 0
Brexit 2,585 0.3% new 0 0
Others 6,473 0.6% Decrease2.0% 0 0
Total 940,312 100.0 18

Percentage votes[edit]

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 55.1 55.3 54.2 41.2 41.6 42.8 49.5 52.2 56.6 57.1
Labour 14.7 14.5 18.6 28.3 27.6 23.2 14.9 16.9 26.6 20.1
Liberal Democrat1 29.9 30.0 26.0 25.3 27.8 29.6 29.7 11.3 12.2 18.6
Green Party - * * * * * 0.7 4.3 2.0 3.3
UKIP - - - * * * 3.9 14.7 2.0 *
Brexit Party - - - - - - - - - 0.3
Other 0.2 0.2 1.2 5.1 3.0 4.4 1.3 0.5 0.6 0.6

11983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

* Included in Other

Seats[edit]

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 15 15 14 11 10 10 14 17 16 16
Labour 0 0 1 3 3 3 2 1 2 2
Liberal Democrat1 0 0 0 3 4 4 2 0 0 0
Total 15 15 15 17 17 17 18 18 18 18

11983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

Maps[edit]

Historical representation by party[edit]

A cell marked → (with a different colour background to the preceding cell) indicates that the previous MP continued to sit under a new party name.

1885 to 1918[edit]

  Conservative   Independent Conservative   Liberal   Liberal Unionist   National Party

Constituency 1885 1886 87 88 1892 1895 96 97 00 1900 01 04 05 1906 06 Jan 1910 Dec 1910 12 16 17 18
Andover Beach E. Faber W. Faber
Basingstoke Sclater-Booth Jeffreys Salter Geddes
Christchurch Young Smith Balfour Allen Croft Croft
Fareham Fitzwygram Lee Davidson
New Forest F. Compton Douglas-Scott-Montagu H. Compton Hobart Perkins
Petersfield Palmer Wickham Nicholson
Portsmouth Crossman Baker Majendie Baker Falle
Vanderbyl Wilson Clough Bramsdon Lucas Bramsdon Beresford Meux
Southampton Giles Chamberlayne Evans Chamberlayne Philipps
Commerell Evans Simeon Ward
Winchester Tottenham Moss Myers G. V. Baring Carnegie
Isle of Wight Webster Seely G. Baring Hall

1918 to 1950[edit]

  Coalition Liberal (1918-22) / National Liberal (1922-23)   Conservative   Labour   Liberal   National Government   National Liberal (1931-68)   National Party

Constituency 1918 20 21 1922 22 23 1923 1924 1929 31 1931 32 34 1935 39 40 40 41 43 1945 45
Aldershot Palmer Lyttelton
Basingstoke Geddes Holbrook Fletcher Holbrook Wallop Wolff Donner
Bournemouth Croft Lyle Bracken
Fareham Davidson Inskip White
New Forest & Christchurch Perkins Ashley Mills Crosthwaite-Eyre
Petersfield Nicholson Dorman-Smith Jeffreys
Portsmouth Central Bramsdon Privett Bramsdon Foster Hall Beaumont Snow
Portsmouth North Falle Keyes James Bruce
Portsmouth South Cayzer Wilson Cayzer Lucas
Southampton Philipps Perkins Morley Barrie Reith Thomas Morley
Ward Bathurst Lewis Craven-Ellis Lewis
Winchester Hennessy Ellis Palmer Jeger
Isle of Wight Hall Chatfeild-Clarke Seely Macdonald

1950 to 1983[edit]

  Conservative   Labour   Liberal   Social Democratic   Speaker

Constituency 1950 1951 52 54 1955 1959 60 64 1964 65 1966 68 1970 71 Feb 1974 Oct 1974 77 1979 81
Aldershot Lyttelton Errington Critchley
Basingstoke Donner Freeth Mitchell
Bournemouth East & Christchurch / Bth East (1974) Bracken Nicolson Cordle Atkinson
Bournemouth West Gascoyne-Cecil Eden
Christchurch and Lymington N/A Adley
Eastleigh N/A Price
Gosport and Fareham / Fareham (1974) Bennett Lloyd
Gosport N/A Viggers
New Forest Crosthwaite-Eyre McNair-Wilson
Petersfield Jeffreys Legh Quennell Mates
Portsmouth Langstone / Havant & Waterloo (1974) Stevens Lloyd
Portsmouth South Lucas Pink
Portsmouth West / Portsmouth North (1974) Clarke Judd Griffiths
Southampton Itchen Morley King Mitchell
Southampton Test King Howard Fletcher-Cooke Mitchell Hill Gould Hill
Winchester Smithers Morgan-Giles Browne
Isle of Wight Macdonald Woodnutt Ross

1983 to present[edit]

  Conservative   Democratic Unionist   Independent   Independent Conservative   Labour   Liberal   Liberal Democrats   Social Democratic

Constituency 1983 84 1987 1992 94 1997 00 2001 02 04 2005 2010 13 2015 2017 2019
Aldershot Critchley Howarth Docherty
Basingstoke Hunter Miller
East Hampshire Mates Hinds
Eastleigh Price Milligan Chidgey Huhne Thornton Davies Holmes
Fareham Lloyd Hoban Braverman
Gosport Viggers Dinenage
Havant Lloyd Willetts Mak
Meon Valley Hollingbery Drummond
New Forest / New Forest East (1997) McNair-Wilson Lewis
New Forest West Swayne
North East Hampshire Arbuthnot Jayawardena
North West Hampshire Mitchell Young Malthouse
Portsmouth North Griffiths Rapson McCarthy-Fry Mordaunt
Portsmouth South Pink Hancock Martin Hancock Drummond Morgan
Romsey and Waterside / Romsey (1997) / Romsey & Southampton North (2010) Colvin Gidley Nokes
Southampton Itchen Chope Denham Smith
Southampton Test Hill Whitehead
Winchester Browne Malone Oaten Brine
Isle of Wight Ross Field Brand Turner Seely

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ BC denotes borough constituency, CC denotes county constituency.
  2. ^ The majority is the number of votes the winning candidate receives more than their nearest rival.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Baker, Carl; Uberoi, Elise; Cracknell, Richard (2020-01-28). "General Election 2019: full results and analysis". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. ^ a b c "Constituencies A-Z - Election 2019". BBC News. Retrieved 2020-04-24.
  3. ^ "Update: Strengthening Democracy:Written statement - HCWS183". UK Parliament. Retrieved 2020-04-20.
  4. ^ Watson, Christopher; Uberoi, Elise; Loft, Philip (2020-04-17). "General election results from 1918 to 2019". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)