List of Parliamentary constituencies in North Yorkshire

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The county of North Yorkshire, together with the unitary authority of York, is divided into 8 Parliamentary constituencies - one Borough constituency and 7 County constituencies.

Constituencies[edit]

  † Conservative   ‡ Labour   ¤ Liberal Democrat

Constituency[nb 1] Electorate[1] Majority[2][nb 2] Member of Parliament[2] Nearest opposition[2] Map
Harrogate and Knaresborough CC 77,941 9,675   Andrew Jones   Judith Rogerson¤
Richmond (Yorks) CC 82,569 27,210   Rishi Sunak   Thom Kirkwood‡
Scarborough and Whitby CC 74,404 10,270   Robert Goodwill   Hugo Fearnley‡
Selby and Ainsty CC 78,398 20,137   Nigel Adams   Malik Rofidi‡
Skipton and Ripon CC 78,673 23,694   Julian Smith   Brian McDaid‡
Thirsk and Malton CC 80,991 25,154   Kevin Hollinrake   David Yellen‡
York Central BC 74,899 13,545   Rachael Maskell   Fabia Tate†
York Outer CC 74,673 9,985   Julian Sturdy   Anna Perrett‡

Changes made in 2010[edit]

Former name Former boundaries
  1. City of York BC
  2. Harrogate and Knaresborough BC
  3. Richmond (Yorks) CC
  4. Ryedale CC
  5. Scarborough and Whitby CC
  6. Selby CC
  7. Skipton and Ripon CC
  8. Vale of York CC
Parliamentary constituencies in North Yorkshire

The Boundary Commission for England recommended that the area continue to be divided into 8 constituencies, but extensively redrawn in the south-eastern part to accommodate exactly two seats in what is now York. These changes were implemented at the 2010 United Kingdom general election.

Current name Current boundaries
  1. Harrogate and Knaresborough CC
  2. Richmond (Yorks) CC
  3. Scarborough and Whitby CC
  4. Selby and Ainsty CC
  5. Skipton and Ripon CC
  6. Thirsk and Malton CC
  7. York Central BC
  8. York Outer CC
Proposed Revised constituencies in North Yorkshire

Proposed boundary changes[edit]

The Boundary Commission for England submitted their final proposals in respect of the Sixth Periodic Review of Westminster Constituencies (the 2018 review) in September 2018. Although the proposals were immediately laid before Parliament they were not brought forward by the Government for approval. Accordingly, they did not come into effect for the 2019 election which took place on 12 December 2019, and which was contested using the constituency boundaries in place since 2010.

Under the terms of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Act 2011, the Sixth Review was based on reducing the total number of MPs from 650 to 600 and a strict electoral parity requirement that the electorate of all constituencies should be within a range of 5% either side of the electoral quota.

On 24 March 2020, the Minister of State for the Cabinet Office, Chloe Smith, issued a written statement to Parliament setting out the Government's thinking with regard to parliamentary boundaries. They propose to bring forward primary legislation to remove the statutory obligation to implement the 2018 Boundary Review recommendations, as well as set the framework for future boundary reviews in time for the next review which is due to begin in early 2021 and report no later than October 2023. It is proposed that the number of constituencies now remains at the current level of 650, rather than being reduced to 600, while retaining the requirement that the electorate should be no more than +/- 5% from the electoral quota.[3]

Results history[edit]

Primary data source: House of Commons research briefing - General election results from 1918 to 2019[4]

2019[edit]

The number of votes cast for each political party who fielded candidates in constituencies comprising North Yorkshire in the 2019 general election were as follows:

Party Votes % Change from 2017 Seats Change from 2017
Conservative 239,887 54.4% Increase0.3% 7 0
Labour 112,500 25.5% Decrease8.6% 1 0
Liberal Democrats 64,772 14.7% Increase7.4% 0 0
Greens 11,441 2.6% Increase0.7% 0 0
Brexit 1,479 0.3% new 0 0
Others 10,867 2.5% Decrease0.1% 0 0
Total 440,946 100.0 8

Percentage votes[edit]

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 56.1 53.1 52.8 40.0 43.6 43.7 46.8 48.5 54.1 54.4
Labour 16.3 19.0 23.6 32.8 29.6 27.9 19.0 22.2 34.1 25.5
Liberal Democrat1 27.4 27.5 22.9 23.0 23.5 24.7 27.8 9.2 7.3 14.7
Green Party - * * * * * 1.0 5.1 1.9 2.6
UKIP - - - * * * 2.7 13.2 1.1 *
Brexit Party - - - - - - - - - 0.3
Other 0.2 0.4 0.7 4.2 3.4 3.7 2.7 1.9 1.5 2.5

11983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

* Included in Other

Seats[edit]

Election year 1983 1987 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
Conservative 7 7 6 4 4 5 7 7 7 7
Labour 0 0 1 3 3 2 1 1 1 1
Liberal Democrat1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Total 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

11983 & 1987 - SDP-Liberal Alliance

Maps[edit]

Historical representation by party[edit]

Data given here is for the North Riding of Yorkshire until 1983, and includes the city of York throughout. A cell marked → (with a different colour background to the preceding cell) indicates that the previous MP continued to sit under a new party name.

1885 to 1918[edit]

  Conservative   Independent Labour   Liberal   Liberal-Labour

Constituency 1885 1886 1892 93 1895 97 98 00 1900 02 05 1906 Jan 1910 Dec 1910 15
York A. Pease Butcher Greenwood A. Rowntree
Lockwood Beresford Faber Butcher
Cleveland H. Pease A. Pease Samuel
Middlesbrough I. Wilson J. Wilson Sadler J. Wilson Williams
Richmond (Yorks) Milbank Elliot Hutton Dyke Acland Orde-Powlett
Scarborough Sitwell J. Rowntree Sitwell Compton-Rickett Rea
Thirsk and Malton Dawnay Lawson Duncombe Turton
Whitby E. Beckett Buxton G. Beckett

1918 to 1950[edit]

  Conservative   Independent   Labour   Liberal

Constituency 1918 1922 1923 1924 28 1929 31 1931 1935 37 40 41 45 1945 48 49
York Butcher Marriott Burgess Lumley Wood Corlett
Cleveland Goff Starmer Goff Mansfield Bower Willey
Middlesbrough East Williams Brown Williams Wilkinson Young Edwards
Middlesbrough West Thomson Griffith Johnstone Bennett Cooper
Richmond (Yorks) Wilson Dugdale
Scarborough and Whitby Beckett Herbert Latham Spearman
Thirsk and Malton E. Turton R. Turton

1950 to 1983[edit]

  Conservative   Labour   Social Democratic

Constituency 1950 1951 52 1955 1959 62 1964 1966 1970 Feb 1974 Oct 1974 1979 81
York Hylton-Foster Longbottom Lyon
Cleveland / Cleveland and Whitby (1974) Willey Palmer Proudfoot Tinn Brittan
Middlesbrough East / Middlesbrough (1974) Marquand Bottomley
Middlesbrough West / Thornaby (1974) Cooper Simon Bray Sutcliffe Wrigglesworth
Richmond (Yorks) Dugdale Kitson
Scarborough and Whitby / Scarborough (1974) Spearman Shaw
Thirsk and Malton Turton Spence
Redcar Tinn

1983 to present[edit]

  Conservative   Labour   Liberal   Liberal Democrats

Constituency 1983 86 1987 89 1992 1997 2001 2005 2010 2015 2017 2019
York / York Central (2010) Gregory Bayley Maskell
Harrogate / Harrogate and Knaresborough (1997) Banks Willis Jones
Richmond (Yorks) Brittan Hague Sunak
Ryedale / Thirsk and Malton (2010) Spence Shields Greenway McIntosh Hollinrake
Scarborough / Scarborough and Whitby (1997) Shaw Sykes Quinn Goodwill
Selby / Selby and Ainsty (2010) Alison Grogan Adams
Skipton and Ripon Watson Curry Smith
Vale of York / York Outer (2010) McIntosh Sturdy

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ BC denotes borough constituency, CC denotes county constituency.
  2. ^ The majority is the number of votes the winning candidate receives more than their nearest rival.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Baker, Carl; Uberoi, Elise; Cracknell, Richard (28 January 2020). "General Election 2019: full results and analysis". Commons Library.
  2. ^ a b c "Constituencies A-Z - Election 2019". BBC News. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  3. ^ "Update: Strengthening Democracy:Written statement - HCWS183". UK Parliament. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  4. ^ Watson, Christopher; Uberoi, Elise; Loft, Philip (17 April 2020). "General election results from 1918 to 2019".