List of Phi Sigma Kappa brothers

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This is a list of notable brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa men's collegiate fraternity, including those who were members of Phi Sigma Epsilon prior to the 1985 merger.
See Talk page to review guidelines for inclusion.

Government[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Carl G. Bachmann Delta (West Virginia), 1912 Elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1924 for the First Congressional District of West Virginia. Minority Whip, 1931 - 1933. Elected Mayor of Wheeling in 1947. [1]
Frank Llewellyn Bowman Delta (West Virginia), 1902 Elected member of the US House of Representatives 1925 - 1933. Mayor of Morgantown, West Virginia in 1916 and 1917. [1]
William G. Brown, Jr. Delta (West Virginia), 1877 Served in the US House of Representatives 1910 - 1916. [1]
Hugh M. Caldwell Lambda (George Washington), 1903 Mayor of Seattle, Washington, 1920. See listing under Civic Leadership. [2]
Eric Cantor Lambda (George Washington), 1985 U.S. Representative (R-VA); served as Majority Leader [3]
Joseph L. Carrigg Beta (Union), 1925 Elected member of the US House of Representatives 1951 - 1959. [1]
Anthony Coelho Rho Tetarton (Loyola Marymount), 1964 Former U.S. Congressman from California, House Majority Whip [4]
George Bruce Cortelyou Lambda (George Washington), 1896 First United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor. Also served as United States Postmaster General and United States Secretary of the Treasury. Chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1904, and manager of the successful Roosevelt campaign. President of the Consolidated Gas Company (now ConEd), 1909-1935. [5]
Thomas B. Curtis Tau (Dartmouth), 1932 Former U.S. Congressman from Missouri, 1951 - 1969. Noted economist within the Congressional ranks. [1]
Robert V. Denney Sigma Deuteron (Nebraska), 1938 Federal Judge and Former U.S. Representative from Nebraska [6]
Joseph E. Dini, Jr. Eta Deuteron (Nevada), 1950 Former Speaker, Nevada General Assembly, served a record 27 years in the Assembly. Served as Acting Governor of Nevada. [7]
Drew Edmondson Epsilon Epsilon (Northeastern State), 1968 Attorney General of the State of Oklahoma, 1995-2011 (16 years).
Robert Funseth Psi Triton (Hobart) 1948 Retired Assistant Secretary of State [3]
Howard M. Gore Delta (West Virginia), 1900 Former Governor of West Virginia; Former U.S. Sec. of Agriculture [8][9]
Gilbert Gude Eta (Maryland) 1945 Former U.S. Representative from Maryland; Director, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress. [4]
Richard Hecklinger Xi (St. Lawrence) 1965 United States Ambassador to Thailand. [3]
Edwin W. Higgins Epsilon (Yale), 1897 Former U.S. Representative (R-CT). [10]
James D. Hodgson Beta Deuteron (Minnesota) 1938 Former United States Ambassador to Japan; Former Secretary of Labor. [4][11]
John Kee Delta (West Virginia), 1900 West Virginia State Senate 1923–1927. Elected US House of Representatives from West Virginia from 1933 to 1951. [1]
Carleton King Beta (Union), 1926 Elected US House of Representatives from New York from 1961 to 1974. [1]
Phill Kline Epsilon Iota (University of Central Missouri), 1982 Former Attorney General of Kansas, now Professor of Law at Liberty University. Former Kansas state legislator.
Frank J. Lausche Pi Deuteron (Ohio State), (honorary?) Former Senator from Ohio; former Ohio governor
Robert E. Leach Pi Deuteron (Ohio State) 1933 Ohio Chief Justice. [4]
Arthur C. Levitt Chi (Williams) 1952 Former Chairman of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. [3]
Oren E. Long Delta Deuteron (Michigan), (Honorary) Governor of Hawaii at statehood, Senior Senator from Hawaii [12]
Donald H. McLean Lambda (George Washington), 1906 Elected to the US House of Representatives, in office from March 4, 1933-January 3, 1945. He later served as a district judge. [1]
Earl C. Michener Lambda (George Washington), 1903 Elected to the US House of Representatives, in office for most of three decades, serving from March 4, 1919 to March 3, 1933, and again from January 3, 1935 to January 3, 1951. [1]
Matthew M. Neely Delta (West Virginia), 1901 Former U.S. Representative (D-WV); Former Governor of West Virginia [9][13]
Keith Neville Sigma (St. John's), 1905 Former Governor of Nebraska [14]
John D. Scanlan Beta Deuteron (Minnesota) 1951 Former United States Ambassador to Yugoslavia [3][11]
Fred D. Schwengel Gamma Epsilon (Truman State), 1930 Former U.S. Representative from Iowa and one of the founding members and former president of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society. Former President, Phi Sigma Epsilon. [4][12]
R. Smith Simpson Psi (Virginia) 1927 American Consul in Bombay, India; research professor in diplomacy, Georgetown University; author of Anatomy of the State Department [4]
Robert Stivers Phi Deuteron (Kentucky), 1983 Kentucky State Senator; Past Majority Floor Leader and now President of the Kentucky Senate [15]
John H. Sununu Omicron (M.I.T) 1961 Former Governor of New Hampshire; Former White House Chief of Staff [4]
Leo A. Temmey Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1915 Former Attorney General of South Dakota [11]
Charles L. Terry, Jr. Psi (University of Virginia), 1922 Former Governor of Delaware [16]
George Arthur Trail III Pi (Franklin & Marshall) 1958 Retired United States Ambassador to Malawi [3]
John V. Tunney Iota Pentaton (Cal. State/Fullerton) Honorary, 1970 United States Senator from California [4][17]
Robert F. Wagner Zeta (CCNY), 1898 Former U.S. Senator (D-NY), Sponsor of the Wagner Act [18]
George M. Wallhauser Mu (Penn), 1922 elected to the US House of Representatives in 1958, serving until 1965. [1]
Eric Cantor, U.S. House
Tony Coelho, U.S. House
James D. Hodgson, Ambassador
Frank J. Lausche, U.S. Senate
Oren Long, U.S. Senate
John H. Sununu, WH Chief of Staff
Robert Wagner, U.S. Senate

Science and research[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Daniel Brandenstein Sigma Zeta (Wisconsin-River Falls) 1965 Retired Captain, U.S.N.; Former Chief of the NASA Astronaut Office; Veteran of four space shuttle missions [3]
Major Watt Espy Omicron Deuteron (Alabama), 1957 Researcher and historian on Capital Punishment in America, co-author with John Ortiz Smykla of The Espy Files, a database of executions carried out in the United States and preceding territories from 1608. This database is the most complete source of data on the issue, identifying 15,487 people put to death. [19][20]
John Fabian Chi Deuteron (Washington State) 1961 Former NASA Astronaut; Veteran of two space shuttle missions. [4]
Richard F. Gordon, Jr. Lambda Deuteron (Washington) 1951 Retired Captain, U.S.N.; NASA Astronaut, missions: Gemini 11 & Apollo 12. [4]
Leonard J. Grant Lambda (George Washington) 1950 Retired Vice-President, National Geographic Society. [3]
Milton Harris Theta Deuteron (Oregon State) 1926 President, American Institute of Chemists, former vice-president for Research and Development, the Gillette Company.
Dr. Paul H. Jeserich Delta Deuteron (Michigan), 1914 President of the American Dental Association, 1959. Dean of University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 1950-62. [21]
J. Walter Larkin Tau (Dartmouth) 1924 President, Osteopathic College of Ophthalmology, 1959. [22]
Charles C. Price Phi (Swarthmore) 1934 Chairman of the Board, Swarthmore College, winner of the 1974 American Chemical Society Award for Creative Invention of polyether polyurethane rubber, President, World Federalist Educational Fund. [4]
Harry Steenbock Zeta Deuteron (Wisconsin) 1916 Professor of Biochemistry at Wisconsin. Invented the process of irradiation with ultraviolet light, to increase the amount of Vitamin D in foods and other organic materials. Most notably used in milk. Credited with elimination of the disease of Rickets in the U.S. by 1945. Steenbock Memorial Library is named in his honor. [12]
Daniel Brandenstein, astronaut
John M. Fabian, astronaut
Richard F. Gordon, Jr., astronaut

Business, industry and finance[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Vernon Edward Altman Omicron (MIT), 1973 Co-Founder and Senior Partner of Bain & Company [23][24]
Frank Armstrong Mu (Penn), 1922 Chairman of the Board, National Fruit Product Company, owner of White House Foods brand. [4]
Roman F. Arnoldy Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1933 Founder and Chairman of the Board, Triten Corporation, a multinational, privately held multi-billion dollar holding company serving the petrochemical industry. Subsidiary firms include IAG, an engineering, procurement and construction firm, ARNCO, maker of hardened steel products for the petroleum industry, and Recapture Solutions, natural gas extraction technologies. [11]
Ronald G. Assaf Eta Triton (Akron), 1957 Chairman, Sensormatic Electronics [4]
Richard A. Baker Gamma (Cornell), 1988 Governor and CEO, Hudson's Bay Company [3]
Roger Lee Boothe, Jr. Eta (Maryland), 1988 Project Manager, Capital Beltway HOT Lanes Project, Virginia Dept. of Transportation, largest ($1.4 Billion) transportation infrastructure project in the United States [3]
James Bridgeman Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1953 Chairman and CEO, Bridgeman Creamery and the multistate Bridgeman Ice Cream Restaurant chain [11]
John F. Brock Kappa Deuteron (Georgia Tech), 1970 Current President and CEO, Coca-Cola Enterprises
D. William Brosnan Kappa Deuteron (Georgia Tech), 1928 Retired President, Southern Railway System [6]
Robert Buuck Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1970 Founder, Chairman and CEO, American Medical Systems, a manufacturer of implantable devices to treat urological problems. AMS was acquired by Pfizer. Co-founded Iotek, a drug delivery and cardiovascular instrument company. Awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by Medical Alley in 1993. President of the Buuck Family Foundation, supporting programs for the physically disabled. [11]
George Murray Campbell Alpha (UMass), 1920 Vice-President, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, retired
George C. Chacko Omicron (MIT), 1989 Chief Investment Officer of Auda International Hedge Funds, former Harvard Business School professor of finance.
Jerry D. Choate Xi Triton (San Jose State), 1961 Retired Chairman and CEO, Allstate Insurance Company [3]
E. Patrick Coady Omicron (MIT), 1960 Former Director of the World Bank, Chairman of Coady Diemar Partners [23]
Winthrop Buck Cody II Omicron (MIT), 1982 Head of Wealth Management, iGate Corporation. [23]
George Bruce Cortelyou Lambda (George Washington), 1896 President of the Consolidated Gas Company (now ConEd), 1909-1935. First United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor. Also served as United States Postmaster General and United States Secretary of the Treasury. Chairman of the Republican National Committee in 1904, and manager of the successful Roosevelt campaign. See also listing under Government. [5]
Stephen Courter Kappa (Penn State), 1977 Chairman & CEO, NEON Communications Group, Inc., a high bandwidth fiber optic communications carrier in the Eastern US. [3]
Thomas Cusack Mu (Penn), 1977 CEO, Transamerica Life Insurance [3]
Louis W. Dawson Gamma (Cornell), 1919 Former President, Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York [6]
Dan DiZio Beta Pentaton (East Stroudsburg), 1995 Co-founder and CEO, the Philly Pretzel Factory, a 200-store national chain of soft pretzel stores he and partner Len Lehman established in 1995. [25]
Reginald Fils-Aime Gamma (Cornell), 1983 President & COO of Nintendo of America
Philip B. Fletcher Xi (St. Lawrence), 1954 Retired Chairman & CEO, Conagra, Inc. [3]
Samuel Chester Gale Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1916 Vice-President, General Mills, President, the Ad Council, developed brand identities Betty Crocker and Wheaties. Credited with development of first radio advertising jingle, and the ad campaign for Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy. [11]
John T. Gilbride Mu (Penn), 1938 Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Todd Shipyards [4]
George L. Glotzbach Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1953 CEO, Benefacts, Inc. [4][11]
Nat Giustina Theta Deuteron (Oregon State) 1941 Noted expert in forest products. President and managing partner of Giustina Brothers Lumber and Plywood Co., Eugene, Oregon [7]
Glen Hiner Delta (West Virginia), 1956 Chairman, CEO, Owens-Corning Fiberglass [4]
Stephen Huse Sigma Triton (Indiana), 1968 Restaurateur: Founder of the Noble Roman's pizza chain; Owner of Huse Incorporated; Served as Vice chairman of Indianapolis-based Consolidated Products, which operates the Steak 'n Shake chain and various specialty restaurants; Owner of St. Elmo's Steak House in Indianapolis. [26]
Jerry Johnston Iota Pentaton (Cal. St. Fullerton), 1969 President, Chief Operating Officer, The Clorox Company [3]
Vernon A. Johnson Omega (California), 1936 Former Sr. Vice-President, Eastern Region, Lockhead Aircraft; Senior Advisor, Lockheed Corporation [4]
Reginald H. Jones Mu (Penn), 1939 Retired Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer, General Electric Company [4]
Karsten August Kallevig Omicron (MIT), 1999 Investor, currently Real Estate CIO of Norwegian Sovereign Wealth Fund, formerly of Grove International Partners and Soros Fund Management. [23]
Kurt Landgraf Lambda Tetarton (Wagner), 1968 CEO, Educational Testing Service [3]
Andrew Laine Alpha (UMass), 2007 President & CEO, EspanolSeguros.com
Alan Luchette Iota Septaton (Penn State Altoona), 1992 President and CEO at JVB International Inc., an international designer and manufacturer of high-end women's shoes and accessories. [27]
Gilbert C. "Gill" Maurer Xi (St. Lawrence), 1950 Retired Executive Vice-President & COO, The Hearst Corporation [3]
James L. "Pete" Mauthe Kappa (Penn State), 1913 President, Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company. President and director of the Olga Coal Company, the Buckeye Coal Company, and the Youngstown Mines Corporation. Began his career as a blast furnace laborer with the Carnegie Steel Company. Four-year letterman for the Nittany Lions, as fullback; elected to College Football Hall of Fame in 1957. Served on Board of Trustees for both Penn State and Youngstown State University. [28]
Paul E. Miller Gamma Deuteron (Iowa State), 1911 Governor of the Federal Reserve Board. Chairman of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank. Chairman, subcommittee on Agricultural Employment; director, War Planning Committee; director, Land Grant College Association. [2]
Robert Mondavi Nu Deuteron (Stanford), 1936 Former Chairman, Robert Mondavi Winery [4]
Scott Brian Nishiyama Omicron (MIT), 1996 Executive chef at Michelin Guide-rated Chez TJ in Mountain View, CA, previously of New York City's Daniel and The French Laundry in Napa Valley. Interestingly, Nishiyama did much of his early cooking in the MIT Phi Sig kitchen. [29]
Thomas C. Norris Rho Deuteron (Gettysburg), 1960 Retired Chairman & CEO, P.H. Glatfelter Co., a global manufacturer of specialty paper and engineered products.
Steven W. Nygard Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1990 COO of RenewData Corp. [11]
Harold J. Pond Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1919 Chairman and CEO of Advance Machine Co. [11]
James Michael Prusko Omicron (MIT), 1986 Head of Structured Credit at Magnetar Capital, LLC. [23]
Augustus A. Riemondy Nu (Lehigh), 1941 Executive at Hershey Foods and retired Air Force General [12]
William Ritterhoff Omicron (M.I.T.), 1947 Executive vice-president of Bethlehem Steel [12]
Larry Rosenberger Omicron (MIT), 1968 Former CEO of FICO. [23]
Mendel Rosenblum Psi (Virginia), 1984 Co-founder of VMware, an American software company providing cloud and virtualization software and services. Now a subsidiary of EMC Corporation. [30]
Larry Sather Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1973 CEO of Sathers Candy Company, now a division of Ferrara Candy. [11]
Frank M. Totten Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1912 Secretary, Fidelity International-Trust Bank, NY, vice-president of Chase Manhattan National Bank and president of the American Institute of Banking (1928). A "Totten Trust" is a legal instrument, named after him, according to Black's Law. Former Grand Master of Freemasons, Grand Lodge of New York, 1948-50. [11][31]
John William Townsend, Jr. Chi (Williams), 1946 President, the Fairchild Space & Electronics Co., a component of Fairchild Corporation. [4]
Bernard J. Van Ingen Zeta (CCNY), 1911 Head of municipal bond house of B.J. Van Ingen and Co, which he established in 1917. Pioneer in the financing of public revenue bonds. His company was the leading underwriter for the Pennsylvania Turnpike in 1938, the Henry Hudson Parkway, many public power endeavors in Nebraska and the Northwest, and Puerto Rico's electric, water and sewer systems. [32]
Richard H. Wamhoff Phi Upsilon (Valparaiso), 1967 Executive Vice President-Heinz Asia/Pacific [3]
John "Jack" F. Welch Alpha (UMass), 1957 Former Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer, General Electric Co. [4]
Daniel Willard Alpha (UMass), 1882 President, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 1910-1941. Trustee and Chairman of the Board, Johns Hopkins University, 1926-1941. [33]
Geoff Wilson Delta Tetarton (Florida), 2001 President & CEO, 352 Inc.
Robert Wolfe Kappa Deuteron (Georgia Tech), 1960 Chairman & CEO, GenCorp [3]
Charles Zvirman Theta Pentanon (Indiana University of Pennsylvania), 1984 CEO of New Perspective Productions, Pittsburgh, PA. [3]
Vern Altman, Bain & Company
John Brock, Coca Cola
George Cortelyou, ConEd
Reggie Fils-Aime, Nintendo
Robert Mondavi, winemaker
Mendel Rosenblum, VMWare
Frank Totten, Chase Manhattan
Jack Welch, GE
Daniel Willard, B&O Railroad

Religion[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Stewart W. Herman, Jr. Rho Deuteron (Gettysburg), 1930 President, Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago (Retired). [3]
Alvin S. Rudisill Rho Deuteron (Gettysburg), 1950 Chaplain at the University of Southern California (USC). [3]

Entertainment & Broadcast[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Alan Baxter Chi (Williams), 1930 Television and motion picture actor from 1935 to 1966. A popular character actor of his day, portraying classic villains, his credits include many film, stage and television appearances, for example, Perry Mason and The Virginian. [1]
David Cook Epsilon Iota (Central Missouri), 2006 Rock musician, winner of television show American Idol Season #7 in 2008. [34]
Julio DiBenedetto Pi Deuteron (Ohio State), 1951 Producer and Director of television shows.
Frank Filipetti Iota Triton (Connecticut), 1968 Grammy Award-winning recording engineer. [3]
Cedric W. Foster Tau (Dartmouth), 1924 News Analyst, MBS; member of executive staff, Yankee Network.
David French Gamma (Cornell), 1960 Former news anchor, CNN. [3]
Squire Fridell Phi Tetarton (U. Pacific), 1964 Television actor, has appeared in over three thousand television commercials. Portrayed "The Toyotaman" in American TV ads for The Toyota Motor Corporation. Served as the official "Ronald McDonald" clown character commercials for McDonald's restaurants. Supporting character roles in Rosetti and Ryan, M*A*S*H, Newhart, Ironside and Adam-12. [1]
Burl Ives Epsilon Delta (Eastern Illinois), 1931 Actor and folksinger. [4]
Don Knotts Delta (West Virginia) 1946 Television and movie comedian; Five-time Emmy Award winner [4][9]
James L. Loper Chi Triton (Arizona State), 1953 Executive Director, Academy of Television Arts and Sciences [4]
Cheech Marin Xi Pentaton (Cal State Northridge), 1968 Comedian and Actor
James Pier Mason Gamma Deuteron (Iowa State), 1911 Screen actor, veteran of more than 200 films between 1914 and 1952. He was born in France, resided in Iowa and Minnesota, and for most of his life, in California. [1][35]
T. J. Miller Lambda (George Washington), 2003 Actor and comedian
Martin Milner Omega Deuteron (USC), 1953 Television actor, Route 66, Adam 12, etc. [4]
John Bennett Perry Xi (St. Lawrence), 1963 Stage, film and television actor, and musician. Also father to actor Matthew Perry. [6]
Chris Sarandon Delta (West Virginia), 1964 Film actor [4][9]
David Selby Delta (West Virginia), 1963 Television and stage actor [4][9]
Red Skelton Gamma Epsilon (NE Missouri State), Honorary Emmy Award-winning television comedian [4]
Tom Smothers Xi Triton (San Jose State), 1961 One of the Smothers Brothers, popular folk-singing and comedy team [4]
Pieter Sweval Nu Tetarton (Rutgers), 1970 Musician, member of Looking Glass musical group, recorded "Brandy (You're a Fine Girl)", which was a #1 hit in the U.S. in 1972.
Dean Torrence Omega Deuteron (USC), 1966 Musician, member of Jan & Dean musical group. [12]
Barton Yarborough Omega Deuteron (USC), 1925 Radio and TV performer. Notable for the long-running role of Clifford on Carlton E. Morse's "One Man's Family," an NBC show which featured him for nearly 20 years. He also had the role of Sgt. Ben Romero on "Dragnet." [36]:p.195
David Cook, musician
Burl Ives, musician
Don Knotts, actor
Cheech Marin, comedian
T.J Miller, actor
Red Skelton, comedian
Dean Torrence (r.), musician

Civic Leadership[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Joseph H. Batt Lambda (George Washington), 1914 Grand Patron, Order of the Eastern Star, a Masonic-related organization for men and women. 1941. [37]
John Harrison Belknap Theta Deuteron (Oregon State), 1912 National President, Sigma Tau Honorary Engineering Fraternity, 1941-42, now part of Tau Beta Pi. [38]
Hugh M. Caldwell Lambda (George Washington), 1903 Elected Imperial Potentate of the Shrine for North America, 1936, but declined the offer due to poor health, taking an ad vitam Council position instead. Mayor of Seattle, Washington, 1920. [2]
Tom J. Davis Mu Deuteron (Montana), Hon President, Rotary International, 1941-42. Founder, Pylon Club, which became Delta Deuteron at Michigan. [39]
John R. Gann Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1988 Grand Master of Freemasons, Grand Lodge of Minnesota, 2015–16. [11][40]
Walter L. Huber Omega (Ridge Road) (California), 1905 President, American Society of Civil Engineers. Chief engineer for the University of California Medical Center at San Francisco. [41]
Thomas C. Jackson Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1987 Grand Master of Freemasons, Grand Lodge of Minnesota, 2008–09. [11][42]
Karl J. Mohr Delta Deuteron (Michigan), 1913 Grand Master of Freemasons, Grand Lodge of Illinois, 1941–43. [43][44]
J. Ben Robinson Eta (Maryland), 1914 President, American Dental Association, 1943. President, American Academy of the History of Dentistry, 1950. President, American Association of Dental Schools, 1933. President of dental schools at both West Virginia University and at Maryland. [45]
Orville F. Rush Omicron Deuteron (Alabama), 1930 Imperial Potentate of the Shrine for North America, 1966. [3]
Richard J. Russell Omega (California), 1919 National President, Theta Tau professional engineering fraternity, 1928-1932. President of the Association of American Geographers, 1949. Councilor of the Geological Society of America, 1950-1953. Dean of the Graduate School of Louisiana State University. [46]
Roy T. Sullivan, Jr. Alpha Epsilon (Emporia), 1971 Grand Master of Freemasons, Grand Lodge of Kansas, 2009–10. [47]
Frank M. Totten Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1912 Grand Master of Freemasons, Grand Lodge of New York, 1948-50. President, American Institute of Banking, 1928. See also citation under Business and Industry. [48]
James S. Whitfield Epsilon Iota (Central Missouri), 1950 Executive Director, National Headquarters, the American Legion. Past President, Phi Sigma Epsilon, member of Court of Honor, Phi Sigma Kappa. [12]

Military[edit]

Note: Astronauts listed in Science and Research Section

Name Original chapter Notability References
Bert Baston Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1917 Marine Captain, WWI, Marine Colonel, WWII. Awarded Navy Cross in WWI for extraordinary heroism in action near Château-Thierry, France. Had been All-American football player at the University of Minnesota, later elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954. [11][49][50]
Al Brown Alpha Deuteron (Illinois), 1942 Captain, awarded Silver Star in WWII "for outstanding leadership and heroism in action at French Morocco, November, 1942." He served 18 months overseas, taking part in the major battles at North Africa, Sicily and Anzio Beach. [51]:p.121
Kenneth L. Buchanan Alpha Deuteron (Illinois), 1917 Retired, Brigadier General, WWII era. [52]
Lloyd "Scooter" Burke Epsilon Rho (Henderson State), 1949 Retired, Colonel in the US Army, recipient of the Medal of Honor. [4]
John K. Custis Eta (Maryland), 1942 Army First Lt., awarded Distinguished Flying Cross in WWII "for extraordinary achievement while participating in 200 hours of operational flight missions in the Southwest Pacific area, during which hostile contact was probable and expected." [53]:p.23
Marion "Vance" Dawkins Gamma Triton (South Carolina), 1940 Lieutenant (j.g.), awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1944 for his action in connection with the sinking of enemy submarines in the South Atlantic. [54]:p.184
William J. Flood Lambda (George Washington), 1919 Brigadier General, chief of staff of the Seventh Air Force in the Pacific during WWII. Wounded during Pearl Harbor, where he was stationed as commander of Wheeler Field. [55]
Lt. Col. John R. Hane Zeta (CCNY) 1939 Chief of Aircraft and Guided Missile Section, Technical Training Division USAF in the Pentagon [56]
Christopher Hughes Epsilon Nu (NW Missouri State), 1983 Major General, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, Pacific Command. Commanding General, U.S. Army Cadet Command & Fort Knox. Served two tours, 101st Airborne Division. Decorations and awards include Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, and Bronze Star Medal (OLC). [57]
John J. Kelly, Jr. Gamma (Cornell), 1942 Captain, awarded Distinguished Service Cross in WWII "for heroism in action in Sicily, August, 1943." With his company overrun, and no chance of reinforcements, he directed artillery fire to within fifty yards of his position, in order to maintain a crucial advance into enemy territory. He also received the Silver Star. [51]:p.119
Albert W. Kenner Lambda (George Washington), 1915 Highly decorated Army Major General, retiring in 1949 to become medical director of Columbia Hospital. Awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for gallantry. In addition to his World War I decorations, he received three Silver Stars, a Purple Heart for wounds, the French Croix de guerre 1914–1918 with Palm and Legion of Honour. During World War II, he was the Chief medical officer for Operation Torch and Operation Overlord. [58]
Joseph E. Kosakowski Eta Deuteron (Reno), 1942 Army Major, awarded Distinguished Flying Cross in WWII for gallantry in action, while serving as Bombardier on a B-17 airplane in which he manned the nose gun turret of his severely damaged plane, the "Sons of Fury," and fought off repeated frontal attacks from enemy fighters. His exceptional courage and skill was directly responsible for the safe return of the airplane and its crew, 17 November 1942. He also received the Silver Star and the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters. [53]:p.28
Onnie P. Lattu Omega (California), 1930 Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy. Studied under Admiral Nimitz. [59]
Raymond C. Meyer Zeta (CCNY) 1939 Retired, Brigadier General, combat veteran, WWII and Korean War eras. Served in the U.S. Army and later, the New York Air National Guard. [60]
Rodger Olson Alpha Deuteron (Illinois), 1947 First Lieutenant, Marine Corps, served in night fighter squadron 542 in the Pacific over Ulithi and Okinawa. Won five air medals, awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, and a presidential citation. [61]:p.469
Col. Harry E. Spieth, Jr. Theta Deuteron (Oregon State), 1938 Army Air Corps Colonel, B-17 pilot. Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for action in the Coral Sea where among other actions he rescued General MacArthur and his staff from the encroaching Japanese. He racked two direct hits on Japanese cruisers. He was subsequently awarded a second Distinguished Flying Cross and a Silver Star. Pilot of the "Immortal 19th" bombardment group. [51]:p.120[52]
Frederick L. Thomas, Jr. Delta (West Virginia), 1945 Army First Lt., awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in Korea "for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 17 August 1951." Commended at that time for leading a successful mission under adverse conditions. Also WWII veteran, while in Korea completed 100 combat missions prior to rotation home. [36]:p.152
Frank T. Watkins Lambda (George Washington), 1921 Retired, Rear Admiral, commander of the Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet 1954, previously Commanding Officer of the Naval School of General Line, Monterey, California, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Administration), Navy Department. [62]
R. G. Weede Beta Epsilon (Pittsburg State), 1932 Retired, Lt. General, Office of the Commandant, US Marine Corps. [4]
Theodore S. Wilkinson Lambda (George Washington), 1912 Rear Admiral; Recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor; Naval Commander in the South Pacific during World War II. Now deceased [56]
Arthur E. Williams Xi (St. Lawrence) 1960 Retired Lt. General; Commander of the US Army Corps of Engineers. [56]
Amos W. Woodcock Eta (Maryland), 1903 Retired, General Officer, WWII. [52]
Albert Kenner, Army General

Journalism and Literature[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Gary Brandner Lambda Deuteron (Washington), 1955 Author, The Howling (1977). [63]
Arnold W. Gingrich Delta Deuteron (Michigan), 1925 Co-Founder, Editor and Publisher for over a forty-year span, (1933-1976), Esquire Magazine. [64]
Josiah E. Greene Upsilon (Brown), 1933 Author of several published novels, including The Man With One Talent (1951), A Bridge at Branfield (1948),[65] Not in Our Stars (1945), The Laughing Loon (1939), and Madmen Die Alone (1938).[66] Actor, director and designer for the Duluth (MN) Playhouse and Community Players in Superior, Wisconsin. Phi Beta Kappa member. [67]
A. B. Guthrie Jr. Mu Deuteron (Montana), 1923 Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Way West (1949). Wrote Academy Award-nominated screenplay for Shane (1953). Other novels include The Big Sky (1947) and These Thousand Hills (1956). [6]
John S. Knight Gamma (Cornell), 1918 Publisher and owner, Knight Newspapers, including the Chicago Daily News, Detroit Free Press, Akron Beacon-Journal and Miami Herald; member of Cornell's Board of Trustees
Robert Lindsey Xi Triton (San Jose St.), 1956 Author, The Falcon and the Snowman (1979).
John A. Prestbo Rho Pentaton (Northwestern), 1963 Markets editor, Wall Street Journal, Senior Editor, Dow Jones.
Robert D. Putnam Phi (Swarthmore), 1963 Influential Harvard professor (see citation under Education). On the basis of his original research wrote seminal book, Bowling Alone to address America's loss of community engagement and social capital, and what can be done about it; one of several books he has written. [68]
Steven S. Ross Gamma Tetarton (Rensselaer), 1968 Editor of New Engineer Magazine and Environment Regulations Handbook. [4]
Daniel W. Smythe Beta (Union), 1950 Noted American poet, educator and author. Books include Steep Acres (1942) and Only More Sure (1946). Scraps of paper on which he had written in shorthand some of his poems while serving as an infantryman in Patton's Third Army in France have been displayed in the Library of Congress. A Tribute to this soldier-poet was written in 1983. [61]:p.442
Gay Talese Omicron Deuteron (Alabama), 1953 Author, The Kingdom and the Power (1969), Honor Thy Father (1971), Unto the Sons (1992), among other novels. His short story, Frank Sinatra Has a Cold, is considered by Esquire magazine and other literary critics as arguably the finest short story ever written.[69] [4]
Joel Turnipseed Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1993 Author, Baghdad Express: A Gulf War Memoir (2002), among other novels; contributor to GQ, The New York Times, Granta, and Salon. [11][70][71]
Arnold Gingrich, Esquire founder
John Knight, newspaper publisher
Gay Talese, writer

Sports[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Elden le Roy Auker Iota Deuteron (Kansas State), 1932 American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, noted for his submarine pitching style. Played for the Detroit Tigers and St. Louis Browns. College All American in Football, Basketball and Baseball. [1]
Lloyd S. Backman Delta (West Virginia), 1907 Major League baseball pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals. [9]
Bert Baston Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1917 All-American football player at the University of Minnesota, elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954. Awarded Navy Cross in WWI for extraordinary heroism in action as a U.S. Marine near Château-Thierry, France, later serving as a Colonel in WWII. [11][49][50]
Lou Boudreau Alpha Deuteron (Illinois), 1939 Major League shortstop, 1948 American League MVP, 8-time All Star; Sports Announcer; Member of Baseball Hall of Fame. [1][4][72]
Harold Bradley Nu Triton (Hartwick), 1934 Head basketball coach at Duke, 1950-59. Head basketball coach at Texas, 1959-67. Lifetime .658 winning percentage. Earned ACC Coach of the Year honor in 1959. [73]
Alfred L. Buser Zeta Deuteron (Wisconsin), 1912 All-American football player, head coach of the University of Florida [74]
John L. "Hurri" Caine Omicron Deuteron (Alabama), 1933 Played college football at the University of Alabama, three-time All-American and member of the 1930 national championship team that won the Rose Bowl. Head football coach at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette from 1937 to 1941 and in 1946. [1]
Michael Eaves Phi Deuteron (Kentucky), 1994 NBA broadcaster. Sports Reporter for Fox Sports, former Clippers Courtside and California Sports Report anchor, Sports anchor for Al Jazeera America. [75]
Harry Elliott Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1950 American professional baseball player who appeared in 92 games in Major League Baseball for the 1953 and 1955 St. Louis Cardinals. Held Big Ten batting championship. Taught high school physical education for many years at El Cajon, California. [76]
Dick Enberg Epsilon Xi (Central Michigan), 1956 Nationally known NBC Sportscaster [4][12]
James Franklin Beta Pentaton (East Stroudsburg), 1995 Head Football Coach, Penn State University. Former head coach, Vanderbilt University. Selected as the Dave McClain Coach of the Year (Big Ten Coach of the Year) in Nov. 2016 by the media. Collegiate standout, setting seven school records as quarterback and noted as a Division II Player of the Year finalist for 1994. [25]
Frank Gifford Omega Deuteron (USC), 1952 New York Giants star. As a collegiate athlete, named a football All-American. All-NFL first team six times, playing in three NFL championship games, including the 1956 Super Bowl, the same year he was named the league's most valuable player. He retired from active play to become a renowned sportscaster known as the voice of Monday Night Football, and was voted into the NFL Hall of Fame. [4]
Bryan and Joel Glazer Epsilon Triton (American) 1986 and 1989, respectively Co-Executive Vice Presidents, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, joint-Chairmen, Manchester United Football Club
Dick Gunn Alpha Deuteron (Illinois), 1957 Shortstop, All Big 10 nominee. Big 10 record for most fielding assists in one game. [72]
Dick Harlow Kappa (Penn State), 1912 Head football coach at Pennsylvania State University (1915–1917), Colgate University (1922–1925), McDaniel College (1926–1934), and Harvard University (1935–1942, 1945–1947), compiling a career college football record of 149–69–17. Pioneered modern defensive schemes, utilizing shifts, reverses, and lateral passes. Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1954. [1]
Neil T. Kazaross Beta (Union), 1981 All-Time US Amateur Backgammon Champion, 1993–2008
Andy Kozar Xi Deuteron (Tennessee), 1953 College Football All-American in 1952, played for Tennessee as a fullback. Drafted #140 in 1952 by the Chicago Bears. [77]
James L. "Pete" Mauthe Kappa (Penn State), 1913 College Football All-American, four-year letterman for the Nittany Lions, as fullback; elected to College Football Hall of Fame in 1957. Captain of undefeated 1912 squad. Served on Board of Trustees for both Penn State and Youngstown State University. Professionally, was president of Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company during WWII, one of the largest steel companies in the world. See listing under Business and Industry. [28]
Justin McCarthy Alpha (Massachusetts), 1921 American ice hockey player who competed in the 1924 Winter Olympics, at Chamonix, France. He was the captain of the American ice hockey team, which won the silver medal. [78]
David P. Montgomery Mu (Penn), 1968 President, Philadelphia Phillies
Ed Ott Nu Tetarton (Rutgers), 1972 Former professional baseball catcher and coach. Played in the Major Leagues for the Pittsburgh Pirates and California Angels between 1974 and 1981. 1979 World Series Champion. [72]
Dan Patrick Eta Hexaton (Dayton), 1979 Sportscenter anchor, ESPN Sports Network [79]
Frank R. Pond Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1923 Head coach, University of Minnesota Gopher Hockey, 1930-35. Captain of Phi Sig's interfraternity team that won the championship in 1921. From this, as a booster and player, Pond, with others was responsible for formation of Varsity team in 1921. Captain of Varsity team in 1922-23. University of Minnesota hockey's "Frank R. Pond Rookie of the Year" award is named in his honor. Pond lived in Edina, MN, owned a chain of eight multistate mechanical and refrigeration supply stores, retiring in the early 1970s. [11][80][81]
Dennis Ralston Omega Deuteron (USC), 1964 World Team tennis pro; Men's and NCAA champion; Tennis Coach, SMU. [4]
Dale "Slick" Ramsburg Delta (West Virginia), 1965 Starting shortstop for the Montaineers in the 1963–64 season. After a brief stint in the Twins minor league system, became long-serving head baseball coach at West Virginia, compiling 540 victories over 27 seasons, from 1968 to 1994. [1]
Jay Rhodemyre Phi Deuteron (Kentucky), 1948 MVP of the 1948 College Football All-Star Team, drafted that year in the 7th round by the Green Bay Packers, for whom he played four years at Center. [61]:p.476
Abial "Red" Rolfe Tau (Dartmouth), 1931 Third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. Anchored Yankee's 1930's dynasty. 5-time World Series Champion, 4-time All Star. Long-time Athletic Director at Dartmouth, coach at Yale. [1][72]
George Savitsky Mu (Penn), 1947 Played college football at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was a football All-American all four years. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1947, played a year to raise funds for dental school, and had a career as an oral surgeon. [1]
Vic Sears Theta Deuteron (Oregon State), 1941 Football offensive lineman for the Philadelphia Eagles. Played college football at Oregon State, drafted in the fifth round of the 1941 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Sears is a member of the NFL's 1940s All-Decade Team. [1]
Chris Schenkel Delta Triton (Purdue), 1945 Nationally known Sportscaster. [4]
Ernie Smith Omega Deuteron (USC), 1933 Football offensive tackle at USC. Played professionally from 1935 to 1939 for the Green Bay Packers. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1970. [1]
George F. Veenker Xi (St. Lawrence), 1916 Head basketball coach at the University of Michigan from 1928 to 1931. Served as an assistant football coach at Michigan from 1926 to 1929. From 1931 to 1936, he was the head football coach at Iowa State College (now known as Iowa State University). Athletic director at Iowa State from 1933 to 1945. Veenker Memorial Golf Course on the Iowa State campus is named in his honor. [82]
George Vukovich Kappa Tetarton (Southern Illinois), 1978 Major League Baseball outfielder. Played six seasons from 1980 to 1985 for the Philadelphia Phillies and Cleveland Indians. Played two seasons in Japan for the Seibu Lions in 1986 and 1987. 1980 World Series Champion. [72]
Frederick A. Wyatt Beta (Union), 1969 Lacrosse National Hall of Fame [4]
Lou Boudreau, baseball
Dick Enberg, NBC, CBS, ESPN
"Pete" Mauthe, All-American
Dan Patrick, ESPN
Red Rolf, baseball
Chris Schenkel, ABC

Education[edit]

Name Original chapter Notability References
Charles A. Anderson Chi (Williams), 1912 Former president of Coe College, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Former president of Tusculum College, near Greeneville, Tennessee. Presbyterian minister of the University of Pennsylvania. [83]
James B. Appleberry Epsilon Iota (Central Missouri), 1962 President Emeritus, Northern Michigan University. [56]
Alexander Astin Rho Deuteron (Gettysburg), 1953 Professor of Education, UCLA and Director of the Higher Educational Research Institute. [12][56]
William Brandenburg Beta Epsilon (Pittsburg State), 1930 President Wayne State College, of Wayne, Nebraska. [12]
William Penn Brooks Alpha (Massachusetts Agricultural (UMass)), 1875 President of the Sapporo Agricultural College (now Hokkaidō University). President of the Massachusetts Agricultural College (now the University of Massachusetts Amherst). Noted author on Agricultural themes. A dormitory, Brooks House, is named in his honor. Founder, Phi Sigma Kappa [12][84][85]
John W. Dorsey, Jr. Eta (Maryland), 1958 Chancellor, University of Maryland Baltimore County. [12][56]
Thomas Fell Eta (Maryland), Honorary President of St. Johns College from 1886-1923. [86]
Anthony Fusaro Lambda Triton (Rhode Island), 1958 CEO, Penn State Abington, former Assistant Provost at Northern Illinois University. Past Grand President, Phi Sigma Kappa. [4][87]
Charles E. Glassick Pi (Franklin & Marshall) 1953 Former president, Gettysburg College. [56]
Paul E. Gray Omicron (M.I.T.), 1954 14th President of M.I.T. from 1980 to 1990, Member of White House Science Council, Professor of Electrical Engineering at M.I.T. and respected educator. [56]
Douglas Greenberg Nu Tetarton (Rutgers), 1969 Professor, University of Southern California, contributed a short documentary featured on the DVD for Schindler's List. Greenberg is also Dean of the School of Arts and Science for Rutgers University. [88]
Edwin M. Hartman Pi (Franklin & Marshall), 1895 Longtime President of the Franklin & Marshall Academy, preparatory school co-located at Franklin & Marshall College. Hartman Hall named in his honor. [89]
Richard Herman Iota (Stevens Institute), 1963 Former Chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [90]
Charles Sumner Howe Alpha (UMass), 1878 President of Case School of Applied Science 1902 to 1929, which became Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. Former professor of Buchtel College, which became the University of Akron, Akron, Ohio. First Grand President, Phi Sigma Kappa. [91]
Dr. Paul H. Jeserich Delta Deuteron (Michigan), 1914 Dean of University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 1950-62. President of the American Dental Association, 1959. [21]
Perry F. Kendig Pi (Franklin & Marshall), 1932 President, Roanoke College, from 1963 to 1975.
Warren C. Lovinger Epsilon Iota (Central Missouri), Honorary President Emeritus, Central Missouri State University. [56]
Richard W. Lyman Phi (Swarthmore) 1944 President, Rockefeller Foundation 1980–1988; Former President, Stanford University. [4]
Jack Magruder Gamma Epsilon (Truman State), 1957 President of Northeast Missouri State University during its transition into Truman State University.
Joseph F. Marsh Delta (West Virginia), 1945 President Waynesburg University, of Waynesburg, Pennsylvania. [4]
William T. Middlebrook Tau (Dartmouth) 1912 Comptroller, long-time VP of Business Administration, Secretary of Board of Regents, University of Minnesota; Wrote seminal text on estimating building needs for a college or university. Middlebrook Hall, a dormitory, named after him. [11]
James Minholland Kappa (Penn State), 1911 President, Board of Trustees, and Acting President Penn State. [92]
J.C. Powell Phi Deuteron (Kentucky), 1951 President Eastern Kentucky University. [6]
Robert D. Putnam Phi (Swarthmore), 1963 Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard, Distinguished Visiting Professor at Aarhus University in Denmark, former visiting professor and director of the Manchester Graduate Summer Programme in Social Change at the University of Manchester, England. Consulted with President Clinton on civic engagement. Wrote seminal book, Bowling Alone to address America's loss of community engagement and social capital, and what can be done about it. [68]
Frank Prentice Rand Chi (Williams), 1912 Former Dean of the school of Liberal Arts at Massachusetts Agricultural (UMass), Amherst, Massachusetts, where he was Chairman of the English Department, teaching that subject from 1914 to 1960. Director of theater group, The Roister Doisters for 27 years. Editor of Phi Sigma Kappa's magazine for members, The Signet, national secretary and author of the Fraternity's first history, Phi Sigma Kappa, a History. The theater at the University of Massachusetts was named in his honor. [93]
J. Ben Robinson Eta (Maryland), 1914 President of dental schools at both West Virginia University and at Maryland. President, American Dental Association, 1943. President, American Academy of the History of Dentistry, 1950. President, American Association of Dental Schools, 1933. See listing under "Civic Leadership." [45]
Kenneth C. Rogers Xi (St. Lawrence), 1950 President Emeritus Stevens Institute of Technology. Former member, Nuclear Regulatory Commission. [4]
Carlyle M. Scott Beta Deuteron (Minnesota), 1895 (Charter member and alumnus initiate) Chairman of Music Department, University of Minnesota; Responsible for building of Northrup Auditorium, which serves the University today and was a home for the Minnesota Orchestra until 1974. The University's Scott Hall named in his honor. [11]
Daniel F. Sullivan Xi (St. Lawrence), 1965 Former president, Allegheny College of Meadville, Pennsylvania, former president, Carleton College of Northfield, Minnesota, president St. Lawrence University, now in independent consultancy to higher education in support of liberal education and strategic planning for collegiate presidents. Sullivan Student Center at St. Lawrence named in honor of Sullivan and his wife, Ann. [94][95]
James S. Vinson Rho Deuteron (Gettysburg), 1963 Retired president, University of Evansville, Evansville, Indiana. [56]
Francis W. Weeks Phi (Swarthmore), 1937 Chairman of Business and Technical Writing, University of Illinois, Executive Director, Association for Business Communication. [4][96]
Ellis F. White Xi (St. Lawrence), 1933 Former president, Essex County College, New Jersey. [4]
Daniel Willard Alpha (UMass), 1882 Trustee and Chairman of the Board, Johns Hopkins University, 1926-1941. President, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 1910-1941. See also citation in Business and Industry. [33]
John D. Williams Phi Deuteron (Kentucky), 1926 Chancellor Emeritus, University of Mississippi. [6]
Robert Putnam, Harvard

References[edit]

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