List of Piedmont blues musicians

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The Piedmont blues (also known as Piedmont fingerstyle) is a type of blues music, characterized by a unique fingerpicking method on the guitar in which a regular, alternating-thumb bassline pattern supports a melody using the treble strings.[1] The result is comparable in sound to ragtime or stride piano styles.[1] The Piedmont blues originated in an area including and extending beyond the Piedmont plateau of the eastern United States, which stretches from about Richmond, Virginia, to Atlanta, Georgia. Piedmont blues musicians come from this area and also from Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Florida.[1][2] Piedmont blues was popular in the early 20th century.[1]

Below is a list of Piedmont blues musicians.

A[edit]

  • Pink Anderson (February 12, 1900 – October 12, 1974). Born in Laurens, South Carolina, Anderson was an early country blues guitarist and singer who performed Piedmont blues. He recorded in the late 1920s with the guitarist and singer Blind Simmie Dooley, from Greenville, South Carolina. Anderson had a long career as a medicine show performer. Interest in him was renewed by blues revivalists in the 1960s, and many of his recordings from that time have been released by Prestige Records.[3]

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

F[edit]

  • Turner Foddrell (June 22, 1928 – January 31, 1995).[22] Acoustic guitarist, singer and songwriter.[23]
  • Frank Fotusky. Guitarist and singer.[24]
  • Rick Franklin (born March 16, 1952)[25] Guitarist, singer and songwriter. With various other musicians, Franklin has released four albums to date and works as a blues musicologist.
  • Blind Boy Fuller (July 10, 1907 – February 13, 1941). Guitarist and singer.[26]

H[edit]

J[edit]

L[edit]

  • Charley Lincoln (March 11, 1900 – September 28, 1963). Born Charlie Hicks in Lithonia, Georgia, he was an acoustic country and Piedmont blues guitarist and vocalist. He was the older brother of Robert "Barbecue Bob" Hicks, with whom he performed from the 1920s until Robert's early death in 1931. Charley Lincoln continued to perform until the mid 1950s. He made several recordings, some for Columbia Records.[47]

M[edit]

P[edit]

  • Charlie Parr (born 1967). Minnesota-based roots musician, Parr is influenced by earlier blues and folk traditions. Inspired by the music of Charley Patton, Lead Belly, Reverend Gary Davis, and Woody Guthrie, Parr's rural surroundings are reflected in his musical style.[58]
  • Dan Pickett (August 31, 1907 – August 16, 1967).[59] Born James Founty, he was a Piedmont blues and country blues singer, guitarist and songwriter.[60] He recorded fourteen tracks for Gotham Records in 1949, several of which have been issued more recently. AllMusic noted that "Pickett had a distinctive rhythmic style and unique phrasing that makes his records compelling decades after his release".[61]

Q[edit]

  • Doug Quattlebaum (January 22, 1929 – March 1, 1996)[62] A guitarist, singer and songwriter, he recorded one single for Gotham Records in 1953, but bizarrely was offered another opportunity following his employment as an ice cream salesman.[63]

T[edit]

W[edit]

  • Curley Weaver (March 25, 1906 – September 20, 1962). Guitarist and singer.[68]
  • Lightnin' Wells. A multi-instrumentalist and singer who has released six albums to date.[69]
  • Josh White (February 11, 1914 – September 5, 1969). Singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist.[70]
  • Warner Williams. AllMusic stated that her and her husband "specialized in the Piedmont blues tradition of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, billing themselves on the folk and blues circuit as Little Bit of Blues."[71]
  • Ralph Willis (1910 – June 11, 1957). Piedmont blues and country blues singer, guitarist and songwriter.[72]
  • Blind Willie Walker (April 1896 – March 4, 1933). Guitarist, singer and songwriter.[73]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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