List of Pokémon video games

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The official logo of Pokémon for its international release; "Pokémon" is short for the original Japanese title of "Pocket Monsters".

Pokémon is a series of role-playing video games and other genres (including puzzle and digital pet games) developed by Game Freak and published by Nintendo. Its spin-off games are developed by Creatures Inc. Most Pokémon video games have been developed exclusively for Nintendo handhelds, video game consoles, and PCs dating from the Game Boy to the current generation of video game consoles.

Main series titles[edit]


Title Details

Original release dates:[1]
  • JP: February 27, 1996
  • NA: September 28, 1998
  • EU: October 5, 1999
  • AUS: October 23, 1998
Release years by system:
1996 – Game Boy[2]
2016 – 3DS Virtual Console[3]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Aka (ポケットモンスター 赤?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Red") and Poketto Monsutā Ao (ポケットモンスター 青?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Blue") respectively.
  • The first titles in the Pokémon series.
  • Red and Green were sold first in Japan, with Blue released a few months later with updated graphics and dialogue.
  • The American releases were Blue and Red, featuring the Pokémon distribution of Japanese Red and Green, and the updates from the Japanese Blue.
  • The three games combined have sold more than any other Game Boy game.[citation needed]
  • Enhanced remakes of Red and Green, called Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen, were released in 2004 for Game Boy Advance.
  • Red and Blue were re-released on Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console in 2016.



Original release dates:[4]
  • JP: September 12, 1998
  • NA: October 18, 1999
  • AUS: September 3, 1999
  • EU: June 16, 2000
Release years by system:
1998 – Game Boy Color[4]
2016 – 3DS Virtual Console[5]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Pikachū (ポケットモンスターピカチュウ?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Pikachu").
  • Unique because your main Pokémon (Pikachu) follows behind you, becoming the first Pokémon game to do so.
  • Director's cut version of Pokémon Red and Blue.[citation needed]
  • Packaged as a Game Boy title outside Japan, but is actually a Game Boy Color title in those regions.[citation needed]
  • Yellow was re-released on Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console in 2016.



Original release dates:
  • JP: November 21, 1999[6]
  • AUS: October 13, 2000
Release years by system:
1999 – Game Boy Color[6]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Kin and Gin (ポケットモンスター 金・銀?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Gold and Silver").
  • Introduced the second generation of Pokémon to video gaming.[citation needed]
  • Used Game Boy cartridges but was packaged as Game Boy Color games.[citation needed]
  • Enhanced remakes of Gold and Silver, called Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, were released in 2010 for Nintendo DS.
  • The first Pokémon games released in South Korea, in 2002.



Original release dates:[9]
  • JP: December 14, 2000
  • NA: July 29, 2001
  • AUS: September 30, 2001
  • EU: November 2, 2001
Release years by system:
2000 – Game Boy Color[9]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Kurisutaru (ポケットモンスター クリスタル?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Crystal").
  • Director's cut version of Pokémon Gold and Silver.[10]
  • The first to introduce a female playable character.



Original release dates:[11]
  • JP: November 21, 2002
  • NA: March 19, 2003
  • AUS: April 3, 2003
  • EU: July 25, 2003
Release years by system:
2002 – Game Boy Advance[11]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Rubī and Safaia (ポケットモンスター ルビー・サファイア?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Ruby and Sapphire").[12] two titles combined have sold more than any other Game Boy Advance game.[13]
  • Introduced the third generation of Pokémon.[14]
  • Enhanced remakes of Ruby and Sapphire, called Pokémon OmegaRuby and AlphaSapphire, were released in 2014 for Nintendo 3DS.[15]



Original release dates:[16]
  • JP: January 29, 2004
  • NA: September 9, 2004
  • AUS: September 23, 2004
  • EU: October 1, 2004
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance[16]
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Faiareddo and Rīfugurīn (ポケットモンスター ファイアレッド・リーフグリーン?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Firered and Leafgreen").[17]
  • Enhanced remakes of Pokémon Red and Green.[18]



Original release dates:
  • JP: September 16, 2004
  • NA: May 1, 2005
  • EU: October 21, 2005
  • AUS: June 9, 2005
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance
Notes:



Original release dates:
  • JP: September 28, 2006
  • NA: April 22, 2007
  • EU: July 27, 2007
  • AUS: June 21, 2007
Release years by system:
2006 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Daiamondo and Pāru (ポケットモンスター ダイアモンド・パール , lit. "Pocket Monsters Diamond and Pearl").[19]
  • Introduced the fourth generation of Pokémon.



Original release dates:
  • JP: September 13, 2008
  • NA: March 22, 2009
  • EU: May 22, 2009
  • AUS: May 14, 2009
Release years by system:
2008 – Nintendo DS
Notes:



Original release dates:
  • JP: September 12, 2009
  • NA: March 14, 2010
  • EU: March 26, 2010
  • AUS: March 25, 2010
Release years by system:
2009 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Hātogōrudo and Sōrushirubā (ポケットモンスター ハートゴールド・ソウルシルバー?, lit. "Pocket Monsters Heartgold and Soulsilver").
  • Enhanced remakes of Pokémon Gold and Silver.



Original release dates:
  • JP: September 18, 2010
  • NA: March 6, 2011
  • EU: March 4, 2011
  • AUS: March 10, 2011
Release years by system:
2010 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā Burakku and Howaito (ポケットモンスターブラック・ホワイト?, lit. "Pocket Monsters: Black and White")
  • Introduced the fifth generation of Pokémon.



Original release dates:
  • JP: June 23, 2012
  • NA: October 7, 2012
  • EU: October 12, 2012
  • AUS: October 11, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Sequels of Pokémon Black and White using the same world map with added locations and various changes two years later.



Original release date:[20]
  • WW: October 12, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Introduced the sixth generation of Pokémon.
  • The first Pokémon games to have a worldwide simultaneous release.
  • First games in the main RPG series to completely feature polygonal 3D graphics.



Original release date:[21]
  • JP: November 21, 2014
  • NA: November 21, 2014
  • EU: November 28, 2014
  • AUS: November 21, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:



Original release date:[22]
  • JP: November 18, 2016
  • NA: November 18, 2016
  • EU: November 23, 2016
  • AUS: November 18, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Poketto Monsutā San and Mūn (ポケットモンスターサン・ムーン?, lit. "Pocket Monsters: Sun and Moon")


Other series[edit]

Trading Card Game series[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:[23]
  • JP: December 18, 1998
  • NA: April 10, 2000
  • EU: December 15, 2000
  • AUS: April 7, 2000
Release years by system:
1998 – Game Boy Color
2014 – 3DS Virtual Console



Original release date:[24]
  • JP: March 28, 2001
Release years by system:
2001 – Game Boy Color


Pinball games[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:[25]
  • JP: April 14, 1999
  • NA: June 28, 1999
  • EU: October 6, 2000
  • AUS: July 13, 1999
Release years by system:
1999 – Game Boy Color



Original release dates:[26]
  • JP: August 1, 2003
  • NA: August 25, 2003
  • EU: November 14, 2003
  • AUS: September 26, 2003
Release years by system:
2003 – Game Boy Advance
2015 – Wii U Virtual Console


Mystery Dungeon games[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:[27][28]
  • JP: November 17, 2005
  • NA: September 18, 2006
  • EU: November 10, 2006
  • AUS: September 28, 2006
Release years by system:
2005 – Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Released on 2 separate platforms:
  • Red Rescue Team was released on Game Boy Advance.
  • Blue Rescue Team was released on Nintendo DS.



Original release dates:[29][30]
  • JP: September 13, 2007
  • NA: April 20, 2008
  • EU: July 4, 2008
  • AUS: June 19, 2008
Release years by system:
2007 – Nintendo DS



Original release dates:[31]
  • JP: April 18, 2009
  • NA: October 12, 2009
  • EU: November 20, 2009
  • AUS: November 12, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 – Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console
Notes:
  • Enhanced remake of Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time and Explorers of Darkness.



Original release date:[32]
  • JP: August 4, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 – WiiWare
Notes:
  • First Pokémon Mystery Dungeon game on a home console.



Original release dates:[33]
  • JP: November 23, 2012
  • NA: March 24, 2013
  • EU: May 17, 2013
  • AUS: May 18, 2013
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • First Pokémon Mystery Dungeon game for the Nintendo 3DS.



Original release dates:[34]
  • JP: September 17, 2015
  • NA: November 20, 2015
  • EU: February 19, 2016
  • AUS: February 20, 2016
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • First Pokémon Mystery Dungeon game to have (at the time) all 720 Pokémon, all of which could be recruited.


Ranger series[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:[35]
  • JP: March 23, 2006
  • NA: October 30, 2006
  • EU: April 13, 2007
  • AUS: December 7, 2006
Release years by system:
2006 – Nintendo DS
2016 – Wii U Virtual Console



Original release dates:[36]
  • JP: March 20, 2008
  • NA: November 10, 2008
  • EU: November 21, 2008
  • AUS: November 13, 2008
Release years by system:
2008 – Nintendo DS



Original release dates:[37]
  • JP: March 6, 2010
  • NA: October 4, 2010
  • EU: November 5, 2010
  • AUS: November 25, 2010
Release years by system:
2010 – Nintendo DS


Rumble series[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:
  • JP: June 16, 2009
  • NA: November 16, 2009
  • EU: November 20, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 – WiiWare
Notes:
  • Known as Melee! Pokémon Scramble in Japan.



Original release dates:
  • JP: August 11, 2011
  • NA: October 24, 2011
  • EU: December 2, 2011
Release years by system:
2011 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:



Original release dates:[38]
  • JP: April 24, 2013
  • NA: August 29, 2013
  • PAL: August 15, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – Wii U
Notes:



Original release date:[39]
  • WW: April 8, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Known as Everyone's Pokémon Scramble in Japan.
  • Sequel to Pokémon Rumble U.
  • Originally released on 3DS eShop as a freemium game in 2015, but physical retail versions were later released in 2016.


Console series[edit]

Title Details
Pocket Monsters Stadium

Original release date:[40]
  • JP: August 1, 1998
Release years by system:
1998 – Nintendo 64



Original release dates:[41]
  • JP: April 30, 1999
  • NA: February 29, 2000
  • EU: April 7, 2000
  • AUS: March 23, 2000
Release years by system:
1999 – Nintendo 64
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Pokemon Sutaduamu 2 (ポケモンスタヅム2, lit. "Pokémon Stadium 2") and also as Pocket Monsters Stadium 2[42]



Original release dates:[43]
  • JP: December 14, 2000
  • NA: March 28, 2001
  • EU: October 10, 2001
  • AUS: 2001
Release years by system:
2000 – Nintendo 64
Notes:
  • Known in Japan as Pokemon Sutaduamu Kin Gin (ポケモンスタヅアム金銀, lit. "Pokémon Stadium Gold and Silver") and also as Pocket Monsters Stadium Kin Gin[44]



Original release dates:[45]
  • JP: November 21, 2003
  • NA: March 24, 2004
  • EU: May 14, 2004
Release years by system:
2003 – Nintendo GameCube



Original release dates:[46]
  • JP: August 4, 2005
  • NA: October 3, 2005
  • EU: November 18, 2005
  • AUS: November 10, 2005
Release years by system:
2005 – Nintendo GameCube



Original release dates:[47]
  • JP: December 14, 2006
  • NA: June 25, 2007
  • EU: December 7, 2007
  • AUS: November 22, 2007
Release years by system:
2006 – Wii



Original release dates:[48]
  • WW: March 18, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – Wii U


Other titles[edit]

Title Details

Original release dates:[49]
  • JP: December 12, 1998
  • NA: November 6, 2000
Release years by system:
1998 – Nintendo 64



Original release dates:[50]
  • JP: March 21, 1999
  • NA: June 30, 1999
  • PAL: September 15, 2000
Release years by system:
1999 – Nintendo 64
2007 – Wii Virtual Console



Original release dates:[51]
  • JP: September 21, 2000
  • NA: December 4, 2000
  • PAL: June 15, 2001
Release years by system:
2000 – Game Boy Color
2014 – 3DS Virtual Console



Original release dates:[52]
  • NA: September 25, 2000
  • EU: March 16, 2001
Release years by system:
2000 – Nintendo 64
2008 – Wii Virtual Console



Original release dates:
  • JP: July 18, 2003
  • NA: December 1, 2003
  • EU: April 2, 2004
Release years by system:
2003 – Nintendo GameCube



Original release dates:
  • JP: May 30, 2003
  • NA: July 12, 2004
  • EU: May 14, 2004
  • AUS: July 16, 2004
Release years by system:
2003 – Nintendo GameCube



Original release dates:
  • JP: December 2, 2004
  • NA: March 14, 2005
  • EU: March 11, 2005
  • AUS: April 7, 2005
Release years by system:
2004 – Nintendo DS



Original release dates:
  • JP: October 20, 2005
  • NA: March 6, 2006
  • EU: May 5, 2006
  • AUS: April 28, 2006
Release years by system:
2005 – Nintendo DS



Original release date:
  • JP: December 31, 2006
Release years by system:
2006 – Mobile phone


Pokémon Battrio

Original release date:
  • JP: November 21, 2007
Release years by system:
2007 – Arcade



Original release dates:
  • JP: March 28, 2008
  • NA: June 9, 2008
  • EU: July 4, 2008
  • AUS: July 4, 2008
Release years by system:
2008 – WiiWare



Original release dates:
  • JP: December 5, 2009
  • NA: November 1, 2010
  • EU: July 9, 2010
  • AUS: September 23, 2010
Release years by system:
2009 – Wii



Original release dates:
  • JP: April 21, 2011
  • EU: September 21, 2012
Release years by system:
2011 – Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Each copy of the game was bundled with a wireless keyboard.



Original release dates:
  • JP: November 12, 2011
  • NA: February 27, 2012
  • EU: March 23, 2012
  • AUS: March 29, 2012
Release years by system:
2011 – Wii
Notes:



Original release dates:[53]
  • JP: March 17, 2012
  • NA: June 18, 2012
  • AUS: June 21, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 – Nintendo DS
Notes:


Pokémon Tretta

Original release date:[54]
  • JP: July 14, 2012
Release years by system:
2012 – Arcade
Notes:


Pokémon Tretta Lab

Original release date:[55][56]
  • JP: August 10, 2013
Release years by system:
2013 – Nintendo 3DS, Arcade
Notes:
  • Developed by Takara Tomy and Marvelous
  • Downloadable game that uses Pokémon Tretta tokens, and a separate hardware shell that is a analyzer and a scanner



Original release date:
  • JP: March 12, 2014
  • NA: March 20, 2014
  • EU: March 13, 2014
  • AUS: March 14, 2014
Release years by system:
2014 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:



Original release date:
  • WW: February 18, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS, iOS, Android
Notes:



Original release dates:[57]
  • JP: December 2, 2015
  • NA: December 3, 2015
  • EU: December 3, 2015
  • AUS: December 4, 2015
Release years by system:
2015 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:



Original release date(s):
  • JP: February 3, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – Nintendo 3DS
Notes:
  • Also known as Meitantei Pikachu: Shin Konbi Tanjō in Japan



Original release date(s):[58]
Release years by system:
2016 – iOS, Android
Notes:


Pokémon Ga-Olé

Original release date(s):
2016
Release years by system:
2016 – Arcade
Notes:
  • Follows the gameplay from Pokémon Battrio and Pokémon Tretta.


Pokémon apps[edit]

Pokédex 3D and Pokédex 3D Pro[edit]

Pokédex 3D is a software available for download from the Nintendo eShop. It is a Pokédex, which displays information on Pokémon from the Black and White versions as well as a 3D model. Only a few Pokémon are initially available, and more can be unlocked through means such as StreetPass, AR cards, and SpotPass.[59][60]

On April 21, 2012, Nintendo announced that there will be a National Pokédex version called Pokédex 3D Pro. It was released in Japan on the Nintendo eShop on July 14, 2012, and internationally on November 8, 2012. Unlike the original, the Pro edition app is not for free, and all Pokémon are already available rather than unlocking them over time although some that are not available can be unlocked by entering the special code on the official website. In addition, it has the background music, new modes, more scenes and backgrounds and features the voice for the name of every Pokémon. The Pro edition replaced the original free app as it became unavailable once it was removed from the eShop on June 17, 2012 in Japan and on October 1, 2012 internationally. An official iOS version was released on November 15, 2012 in Japan, and on December 10, 2012 internationally; the app includes all Unova Pokémon by default, while the Pokémon from the remaining regions must be added via in-app purchases.[61]

Pokémon Bank[edit]

Pokémon Bank is a piece of software available on the Nintendo eShop. It was released in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan on December 25, 2013, Hong Kong on January 22, 2014, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand on February 4, 2014, and in North and South America on February 5, 2014. The application is an online storage system that requires a constant internet connection, and is free to download, but requires a small annual charge for access in order to keep the servers active. The application is compatible only with Pokémon X and Y, Pokémon Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, and the game's Pokémon Storage System. It is basically an online bank, allowing players to currently store up to 3000 Pokémon. But Pokémon holding berries, items, and a cosplay variant of Pikachu cannot be stored.[62]

Pokémon Go[edit]

Main article: Pokémon Go

The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go was released in July 2016 on both Android and iOS platforms. It utilizes the device's internal GPS tracking system in order to find and catch Pokémon in real-time. The system places gyms and Pokéstops in predetermined locations (such as landmarks) throughout the world in order to get the player active and become a Pokémon trainer in real life. The Pokémon themselves spawn randomly, with some types spawning more frequently in certain conditions; nocturnal Pokémon like Gastly only spawn at night, and Magikarp spawn near water. Gyms are used to battle and train Pokémon against other players in the area, and nearby Pokéstops they give free items when spun (they have a 5-minute cooldown per use). It features 146 of the original Generation 1 Pokémon excluding the legendaries such as Mew, Mewtwo, Articuno, Zapdos, and Moltres. While the title is free-to-play, it also implements microtransactions, allowing players to spend real currency to gain access to more items in game. The game was met with praise when released. In September 2016, Niantic released Pokémon Go Plus and a £35 wearable, which issues alerts about any events in the game, including the appearance of a Pokémon or nearby PokéStop.[63][64]

PC titles[edit]

Pokémon TCG Online[edit]

Pokémon TCG Online is the official digital version of the Pokémon Trading Card Game available for both the PC and iPad.[65]

Pokémon PokéROM Gotta LEARN 'em all! Premier Series (The complete collection) Limited Edition[edit]

Pokémon PokéROM Gotta LEARN 'em all! is a series of playable and collectable Mini CD-Roms released by Mattel Interactive in 2000. The Premier Series Collection Limited Edition Box contains all ten discs in the series. Each CD features math puzzles, print programs to print out your own Pokémon, build a desktop Pokémon collection, observe Pokémon and much more. The Pokémon included on the Mini CDs are: 01 Bulbasaur 04 Charmander 07 Squirtle 25 Pikachu 52 Meowth 54 Psyduck 61 Poliwhirl 94 Gengar 133 Eevee 150 Mewtwo.

WB Kid's Pokémon 2000 Adventure Game[edit]

Pokémon 2000 is a first person adventure game released by Cyberworld International Corporation in 2000. Created as a movie promotion for AOL Time Warner, Pokémon 2000 played within Cyberworld's specialized web browser which could display web pages on one side and simple "Wolfenstein" like 3D worlds on the other. Due to a contract dispute, the game was pulled after only being available for four weeks with over one million downloads.

Pokémon Project Studio[edit]

Pokémon Project Studio is a computer program released by The Learning Company on November 9, 1999 in the U.S. This program lets the user create all kinds of Pokémon related projects such as calendars or greeting cards. Each version had stock artwork of different Generation I Pokémon. Some Pokémon were version-specific—for example, Kangaskhan was only available in Blue version, whereas Tauros was only available in Red version. Stock art of human characters like Ash Ketchum and Professor Oak was also included, and users could also add photos and images saved on their own computer.

Installing the program will trigger a false positive in antivirus programs on computers with Windows XP and newer.

Pokémon Trading Card Game Tempest (Pokémon Play It!)[edit]

Pokémon Trading Card Game Tempest Gift Box, developed by Wizards of the Coast, a computer trading card game on CD including a 60-card Tempest theme deck, three 11-card booster packs, one CD-ROM, playing mat, metal coin featuring Pikachu, felt bag, card list, rulebook, damage counters and a tipsheet.

Pokémon: Masters Arena[edit]

Pokémon: Masters Arena is a Pokémon game compilation developed by ValuSoft designed for young children. It contains eight games, testing the players' knowledge to prove themselves as a true Pokémon Master. On mastering all eight games, the player earns 8 posters, which can be printed.

Pokémon: Team Turbo[edit]

Team Turbo is a Pokémon game developed by ValuSoft that is a game compilation designed for young children. It contains five racing games which are used to earn power-ups for use in race course courses. From the main menu, one can choose to do any of the 6 races, any of the 5 minigames, or do an "Adventure Mode" in which you do the races in order, with minigames in between each to earn you extra powerups.

Pokémon PC Master[edit]

Pokémon PC Master is a Pokémon game released in Japan. It is supposed to improve children's knowledge of information technology.

Sega Pico[edit]

Pokémon games were released for the Sega Pico and Advanced Pico Beena

Sega Pico:

  • Pokémon: Catch the Numbers!
  • Pokémon Advanced Generation: I've Begun Hiragana and Katakana!
  • Pokémon Advanced Generation: Pico for Everyone Pokémon Loud Battle!

Advanced Pico Beena:

  • Pokémon Advanced Generation: Pokémon Number Battle!
  • Intellectual Training Drill Pokémon Diamond and Pearl: Letter and Number Intelligence Game
  • Pokémon Diamond and Pearl: Search for Pokémon! Adventure in the Maze!
  • Pokémon Best Wishes: Intelligence Training Pokémon Big Sports Meet!

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pokémon Go was released at different dates in Europe. It was first released in Germany on July 13, 2016 followed by the United Kingdom on July 14, and then Italy, Spain and Portugal on July 15

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pokémon Red". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  2. ^ "Pokémon Red - Game profile". IGN. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  3. ^ "Pokémon Red for Nintendo 3DS". Nintendo. Retrieved 2016-02-17. 
  4. ^ a b "Pokémon Yellow - Release summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  5. ^ "Pokémon Yellow for Nintendo 3DS". Nintendo. Retrieved 2016-02-17. 
  6. ^ a b c "Pokémon Gold - Game profile". IGN. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  7. ^ "Pokémon Gold - Release summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  8. ^ "Pokémon Silver - Release summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  9. ^ a b "Pokémon Crystal - Release summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  10. ^ Provo, Frank (2001-07-31). "Pokémon Crystal - Review". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-08. 
  11. ^ a b "Pokémon Ruby - Release summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-09. 
  12. ^ "Poketto Monsutā Rubī and Safaia" (in Japanese). Nintendo. Retrieved 2008-10-09. 
  13. ^ "Consolidated Financial Statements" (PDF). Nintendo. November 25, 2004. Retrieved January 25, 2007. 
  14. ^ Harris, Craig (2003-03-17). "Pokémon: Ruby Version". IGN. Retrieved 2008-10-09. 
  15. ^ Magdaleno, Alex (2014-05-08). "Nintendo Announces 2 New Pokémon Games for Fall". Mashable. Retrieved 2014-05-10. 
  16. ^ a b "Pokémon FireRed - Release summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2008-10-10. 
  17. ^ "Poketto Monsutā Faiareddo and Rīfugurīn". Nintendo. Retrieved 2008-10-10. 
  18. ^ "Pokémon FireRed - Game Profile". IGN. Retrieved 2008-10-10. 
  19. ^ "ポケットモンスター ダイヤモンド・パール". nintendo.co.jp. 
  20. ^ Goldfarb, Andrew (2013-06-11). "E3 2013: Pokemon X & Y Release Date Announced". IGN. Retrieved 2013-12-06. 
  21. ^ "Pokémon Omega Ruby and Pokémon Alpha Sapphire". May 7, 2014. Retrieved May 7, 2014. 
  22. ^ "Pokémon Sun and Pokémon Moon". February 26, 2016. Retrieved February 26, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Pokémon Trading Card Game Related Games". GameSpot. Retrieved 2013-05-17. 
  24. ^ "Pokémon Card GB2 Related Games". GameSpot. Retrieved 2013-05-06. 
  25. ^ "Pokémon Pinball Release Summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2013-05-17. 
  26. ^ "Pokémon Pinball: Ruby & Sapphire Release Summary". GameSpot. Retrieved 2013-05-17. 
  27. ^ "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Blue Rescue Team - Nintendo DS - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  28. ^ "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Red Rescue Team - Game Boy Advance - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  29. ^ "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Time - Nintendo DS - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  30. ^ "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Darkness - Nintendo DS - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  31. ^ "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Explorers of Sky - Nintendo DS - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  32. ^ "ポケモン不思議のダンジョン 冒険団シリーズ公式サイト &#124 ポケットモンスターオフィシャルサイト". Nintendo. Archived from the original on 12 January 2014. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  33. ^ "Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gates to Infinity - Nintendo 3DS - IGN". IGN. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  34. ^ "Pokemon Super Mystery Dungeon Official Site". Pokemon. Retrieved 23 February 2016. 
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