List of Prisma (app) filters

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A picture of a cat processed via the Speed filter.

This is a list of filters for the photo-editing application Prisma to render images with an artistic effect.

Artists[edit]

Artists represented through the app via the filters include Marc Chagall, Hokusai, Wassily Kandinsky, Roy Lichtenstein, Isaac Levitan, Hayao Miyazaki, Piet Mondrian, Alphonse Mucha, Edvard Munch, Francis Picabia, and Pablo Picasso.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

List of Prisma filters[edit]

Title Description
Abstract Portrait[1][12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Aviator
Bobbie[6][10] The filter is based on Canadian artist Bobbie Burger.[4][6]
Candy[13][14][15][8][16][10][12]
Canyon[8] The filter is based on Hokusai's One Hundred Views of Mount Fuji.[8]
Caribbean[2][17][12]
Coloured Sky[13][16][10][12]
Composition[13][6][16][12]
Curly Hair[18][6][8][16][10][12] RT compared the filter to "a manga pencil sketch."[9] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Curtain[19][6][16][12] Stuff's Sam Kieldsen described it as one of the "Impressionist-style brush stroke filters."[19]
Dallas
Dancers in Blue
Dancers in Pink
Daryl Feril[12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Dreams[13][14][16][10][12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Electric[13][8][10][12] Stuff's Sam Kieldsen described it as one of the "Impressionist-style brush stroke filters."[19]
Femme[15][6][16][20][10][12] Aussie Network News's Cat Suclo described the filter as "a smoothly painted over portrait."[20]
Flame Flowers[13][19][16][10][12]
#FollowMeTo[13][6] The filter is based on Russian photographer Murad Osman.[4][6]
#GettUrban[6][16][12]
Gothic[21][14][15][6][8][16][12] RT compared the filter to Impressionism.[9] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Heisenberg[13][2][4][19][6][16][12] This is intended for portraits that convert color images to black-and-white.[6] Stuff's Sam Kieldsen described it as "a black-and-white ink sketch filter," while The Telegraph's Pramita Ghosh and Riddhima Khanna said it was "bold and heavy B&W strokes" suggesting not to use pictures with bad lighting.[18][19] The filter uses an image of Walter White from television series Breaking Bad.[8] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Ice Cream[15][8] The filter is based on artist Jared Nickerson.[9]
Illegal Beauty[2][10][16][12] The filter is based on artist Natalie Ratkovski.[8][9]
Impression[19][16][10] The filter was sponsored by soap-maker Palmolive.[19]
Light Summer Reading[13][16][12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Love[12] The filter sets images to a philanthropic style and asks users to donate to the Elbi Charity.[12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Marcus D – Lone Wolf[7][16][12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Mark The filter is based on artist Marc Chagall.[8]
MIOBI[13][19] Stuff's Sam Kieldsen described it as one of the "Impressionist-style brush stroke filters."[19]
Mondrian[13][19][7][16][12] The filter is based on the artist Piet Mondrian.[4]
Mononoke[2][15][6][8][16][20][12] The filter is based on Hayao Miyazaki's Princess Mononoke.[11] Aussie Network News's Cat Suclo described the filter as "[i]f you’re feeling more artsy than usual but do not want a too abstract look."[20] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Mosaic[21][13][14][2][15][8][16][12] The filter is based on the artist Alphonse Mucha.[9]
Paper Art[13][1][16][10][12]
Peace
Raoul[15] The filter is based on artist Raoul Dufy.[8]
Red Head[13][16][10][12]
Robots[8] RT compared the filter to graffiti.[9]
Roland[13][14][19][16][12] The filter is intended for landscape or scenery images.[6]
Roy[13][9][16][10][12] The filter is based on Roy Lichtenstein's Go for Baroque.[5][8][9] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Running in the Storm[13][18][6][16][12]
The Scream[6][4][7][12] The filter is based on Edvard Munch's The Scream[21][4][5][6][8][9][11] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Speed
Tears[18][20][10][16][12] Aussie Network News's Cat Suclo described the filter as "the modern newspaper dot-embossed effect."[20]
Tokyo[6][15][8][16][10][12] The Times of India's Anandi Mishra as a "Japanese-themed" filter.[6] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Transverse Line[13][22][6][16][23][12] The filter is based on Wassily Kandinsky's Transverse Line.[5][8] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Udnie[13][6][15][16][10][12] The filter is based on Francis Picabia's Udnie.[4][6]
Urban[10][16][12] As of September 1, 2016, this filter was available in offline mode.[12]
Wave[21][2][18][4][16][12] The filter is based on Hokusai's The Great Wave off Kanagawa.[8][9][11]
We can do it![17][12] The filter is based on J. Howard Miller's We Can Do It!.[17]

Reception[edit]

In July 2016, Wiknix's Jay Bokhiria called Candy, Dreams, Gothic, Mosaic, and Roland the best Prisma filters.[14] The Telegraph's Pramita Ghosh and Riddhima Khanna picked out five filters: Heisenberg, Marcus D – Lone Wolf, Mosaic, Roland, and Udnie.[18] India TV said Bobbie, #FollowMeTo, Mondrian, The Scream, and Udnie were the best filters while "you can ignore the rest."[4] Stuff's Sam Kieldsen favored the Curtain, Electric, and MIOBI filters with "work well with almost any sort of shot you use" as well as Heisenberg "can be brilliantly effective when used with the right base shot." However, Kieldsen critiqued the filters Impression and Mondrian with "rarely seem to produce anything worth looking at."[19] The Kitchn's Ariel Knutson used the filters Candy, Gothic, Femme, Ice Cream, Mononoke, Mosaic, Raoul, Tokyo, and Udnie for various food photography. Knutson called Gothic "the most bold of all the filters." Knutson called Udnie "my favorite filter for the whole app."[15] Aussie Network News's Cat Suclo ranked Femme, Mononoke, and Tears as the three best filters.[20]

In August 2016, The Times of India's Anandi Mishra called Bobbie, #FollowMeTo, Mononoke, The Scream, Tokyo, and Udnie as popular filters.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bruceb News staff (August 25, 2016). "Prisma Turns Your Photos Into Works Of Art". Bruceb News. Bruceb News. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Dove, Jackie (August 15, 2016). "Prisma review: Intelligent photo effects app taps into deep learning for an edgy art connection". Macworld. Mac Publishing. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  3. ^ Furness, Dyllan (July 19, 2016). "Russian AI App Repaints Your Photos Like Picasso". Digital Trends. Designtechnica. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j India TV Tech Desk (July 20, 2016). "5 Prisma filters that are the best; you can ignore the rest". India TV. Independent News Services Private Ltd. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d Lomas, Natasha (June 24, 2016). "Prisma uses AI to turn your photos into graphic novel fodder double quick". TechCrunch. AOL. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Mishra, Anandi (August 17, 2016). "Mundane to magical moments, cellphone app gives artistic touch to snapshots". The Times of India. The Times Group. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  7. ^ a b c d Rawlins, Lauren Kate (July 15, 2016). "Prisma hits one million users". ITWeb. ITWeb Limited. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Rogers, Graham K. (July 6, 2016). "Art and iPhone photographs: Prisma and other available apps". Bangkok Post. Post Publishing Public Co. Ltd. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k RT staff (July 3, 2016). "Life imitating art: RT behind scenes with Prisma app". RT. RIA Novosti. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Vijayakumar (July 20, 2016). "Prisma App Free Download Apk for Android". All Fresh Updates. WordPress. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  11. ^ a b c d Savov, Vlad (July 19, 2016). "Prisma will make you fall in love with photo filters all over again". The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay Zoheb (September 1, 2016). "Now Prisma Let IOS Users Apply Artwork On Photos In Offline Mode". Tech Grapple. Tech Grapple. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Bhawani, Chetan (July 11, 2016). "Prisma App Review – "A beautiful and easy-to-use photo-to-art converter"". Gizmo Times. Gizmo Times. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Bokhiria, Jay (July 26, 2016). "5 Best Prisma Art Filters for Nature Photos 2016". Wiknix. Wiknix. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Knutson, Ariel (July 21, 2016). "10 Food Photos That Look Better with the Prisma App". The Kitchn. Apartment Therapy. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Sargent, Mikah (July 27, 2016). "All the Prisma photo filters and what they look like!". iMore. Mobile Nations. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  17. ^ a b c Startlr staff (August 12, 2016). "New styles for Prisma: Caribbean and We can do it!". Startlr. Startlr. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  18. ^ a b c d e f Ghosh, Pramita; Khanna, Riddhima (July 20, 2016). "Prisma and we". The Telegraph. ABP Group. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Kieldsen, Sam (July 12, 2016). "7 ways to make your Prisma photos look like true works of art". Stuff. Haymarket Media Group. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g Suclo, Cat (July 26, 2016). "Prisma For Android: 3 Best Filters For Selfies". Aussie Network News. Tune Media. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  21. ^ a b c d Andrius (July 2016). "Bored Panda Office Tried Out Prisma App That Turns Photos Into Paintings, Here Are The Results". Bored Panda. Bored Panda. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  22. ^ Davies, Chris (July 20, 2016). "Prisma for Android release this month plus video support "soon"". SlashGear. R3 Media LLC. Retrieved September 25, 2016.
  23. ^ Schroeder, Stan (July 25, 2016). "Prisma on Android is now available for everyone". Mashable. Mashable.com. Retrieved September 25, 2016.