List of ships of the Republic of Korea Navy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

List of ships of the Republic of Korea Navy is a list of historic ships of the South Korean navy. Since the Korean War and until the 90s, well above 100 ships were transferred from the United States Navy to the Republic of Korea Navy.

For a list of ships current in service, see List of active Republic of Korea Navy ships.

Decommissioned ships[edit]

Surface combatant[edit]

Submarines[edit]

  • Dolgorae class (SSM: Midget Submarine)
    • SSM 051 (displayed in Submarine Flotilla NINE)

Patrol[edit]

ROKS Beakdusan (PC 701)
ROKS Imjingang (PF 66)
Personnel of ROK Navy stand at attention on board PT boat while Korean national anthem is played.

Amphibious[edit]

  • Landing Craft Infantry (LCI)
    • Seoul (LCI 101; formerly USS LCI 594;[5] acquired Sep 15, 1946)[1]
    • Jinju (LCI 102; formerly USS LCI 516;[6] acquired Sep 15, 1946)[1]
    • Chuncheon (LCI 103; formerly ?; transferred on 13 December 1946)
    • Cheongju (LCI 104; formerly ?; acquired Nov 24, 1946)[1]
    • Cheongjin[1] (LCI 105; formerly USS LCI(L)-1056; To Korea 1949[7])
    • Jinnampo (LCI 106; formerly ?; transferred on 23 December 1946)
ROKS Gyebong (LST 675)
ROKS Suyeong (LST 677)
ROKS Gadeok (LSM 653)

Mine warfare[edit]

  • Ex-Japanese mine-planting vessels (JMS) (ex No.1 class auxiliary submarine chasers)
    • Daejeon (JMS 301; acquired on October 9, 1946)
    • Tongyeong (JMS 302)
    • Daegu[1] (JMS 303)
    • Taebaeksan[1] (JMS 304)
    • Dumangang (JMS 305; sunk by friendly fire from USS Juneau (CL-119) in 1950)
    • Danyang[1] (JMS 306)
    • Dancheon[1] (JMS 307)
    • Toseong[1] (JMS 308)
    • Daedonggang (JMS 309)
    • Deokcheon[1] (JMS 310)
    • Tongcheon (JMS 311; went to North Korea in 1948)
  • Auxiliary Motor Minesweepers (YMS; later reclassified as AMS)
    • Geumgangsan (YMS 501; later renamed as Gangjin;[11] formerly USS YMS-354)
    • Gyeongju (YMS 502; formerly USS YMS-358)
    • Gwangju (YMS 503; formerly USS YMS-413)
    • Gaeseong (YMS 504; formally HMS BYMS-6; acquired on May 10, 1947, christened on Jun 2 1947[1])
    • Gimhae (YMS 505; formerly USS YMS-356; "To South Korea 1946 as Kim Hae, disposition unknown"[12])
    • Ganggye (YMS 506;[1] formerly USS YMS-392)
    • Gangneung (YMS 507; formerly USS YMS-463)
    • Gangwha (YMS 508; formerly USS YMS-245; "To South Korea 1948 as Kang Wha";[12] went to North Korea in 1949)
    • Gapyeong (YMS 509; formerly USS YMS-220; acquired on Aug 6 1947, christened on Nov 11 1947;[1] struck a mine and sank in Sep 1950[13])
    • Ganggyeong (YMS 510; formerly USS YMS-330; transferred to South Korea in April 1947)
    • Gayasan (YMS 511;[1] formerly USS YMS-423; "To South Korea 1948 as Kaya San, sunk 1949"[12])
    • Guwolsan (YMS 512; formerly USS YMS-323; acquired on Aug 6 1947, christened on Nov 11 1947[1])
    • Gimcheon (YMS 513;[1] formerly HMS BYMS-2258; transferred to South Korea in 1948)
    • Gilju (YMS 514; formerly HMS BYMS-5; transferred to South Korea 10 May 1947)
    • Gyeongsan (YMS 515; formerly HMS BYMS-18 ?; acquired on Aug 30 1947, christened on Sep 21 1947;[1] grounded and damaged beyond repair in Feb 1948,[14] replaced by Unnam)
    • Unnam (YMS 515; later renamed as Goryeong;[1] formerly HMS BYMS-55; transferred to South Korea 28 February 1948)
    • Gongju (YMS 516; formerly HMS BYMS-2148; acquired on Jan 2 1947, christened on Feb 20 1947;[1] struck a mine and sank in Oct 1950)
    • Gowon (YMS 517; formerly USS YMS-473; Sold to South Korea 24 July 1947; "To South Korea 1948 as Ko Won";[12] went to North Korea in 1948)
    • Yongkwang[1] (YMS 518; later renamed as Goseong;[1] formerly HMS BYMS-8; transferred to South Korea 10 May 1947)
  • Coastal Minesweepers (MSC)

Auxiliary[edit]

  • Fuel Oil Barge (Non-self-propelled) (YO)
  • Light Cargo Ships (AKL) - Alcyone (AKL-37), Alhena (AKL-38), Almaack (AKL-39), Deimos (AKL-40), AKL-41, and Renate (AKL-42) were loaned under "FS (AKL) Vessel Rental Contract between the Republic of Korea and the United States of America" in 1951
    • Busan (AKL 901; formerly ?; acquired on Jul 1, 1949)[1]
    • Incheon (AKL 902; aka Jemulpo; formerly ?; acquired on September 10, 1951)[1]
    • Wonsan (AKL 903; formerly ?; acquired on September 10, 1951)[1]
    • Jinnampo (AKL 905; formerly ?; acquired on September 10, 1951)[1]
    • Seongjin (AKL 906; formerly ?; acquired on September 10, 1951)[1]
    • Mokpo (AKL 907; formerly USAS FS-397/USCGC Trillium (WAK-170); transferred on 2 March 1956)
    • Gunsan (aka Cheonsu (?), AKL 908; formerly USS Sharps (AKL-10); transferred on 2 April 1956)
    • Masan (AKL 909; formerly USNS T-AKL-35; transferred on 5 September 1956)
    • Ulsan (AKL 910; formerly USS Brule (AKL-28); loaned on 1 November 1971)
  • Gasoline Tankers (AO/AOG)
    • Cheonji (O 2/AO 2/AO 51; formerly Norwegian-built Hassel[16])
    • Bucheon (AO 3; formerly ?)
    • Hwacheon (AO 5/AO 52; formerly ?)
    • Cheongpyeong (AO 7/AO 53; formerly ?; acquired in 1971)
    • Soyang (AOG 55; formerly USNS Rincon (T-AOG-77); acquired in 1982)
    • Jinyang (AOG 56; formerly USNS Petaluma (T-AOG-79); acquired in 1982)
  • Landing Craft Repair Ship (ARL)
  • Auxiliary Fleet Tugs (ATA)
  • Rescue and Salvage Ships (ARS)
  • Salvage and Rescue Ship (ATS)
  • Miscellaneous
    • Heukjohwan (GB 22; formerly ?; acquired on Mar 26, 1950)[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq Oh, J.; Im, S. (2006). Sohn Won-yil Jedok. Seoul: Korea Institute for Maritime Strategy. 
  2. ^ "US PT Boats List: Summary of US Built PTs". Hazegray.org. Retrieved October 16, 2007.
  3. ^ "U. S. Coast Guard Patrol Boats (WPB)". Shipbuildinghistory.com. Retrieved January 3, 2009.
  4. ^ "H-930 (Mk 93) (United States), Command, surveillance and weapon control systems". Jane's Naval Weapon System. Retrieved September 18, 2008.
  5. ^ Haegun Ilhwa (Navy episodes). Vol. 1, 2004, ROK Navy HQ
  6. ^ "진주함 명명(命名) 및 함장 임명장". National Museum of Korea. Retrieved 2 April 2009. 
  7. ^ "Landing Craft, Infantry (Large) - LCI(L)". ShipbuildingHistory.com. Retrieved 3 January 2009. 
  8. ^ "상륙함 (모형)". National Museum of Korea. Retrieved 3 January 2009. 
  9. ^ "Landing Ships, Tank (LST)". ShipbuildingHistory.com. Retrieved 3 January 2009. 
  10. ^ a b Haegun Jeolleok. South Korea: Gunsajeongbo. February 2001. p. 51. 
  11. ^ "소해정 (모형)". National Museum of Korea. Retrieved 3 January 2009. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Yard Minesweepers (YMS and BYMS)". ShipbuildingHistory.com. Retrieved 3 January 2009. 
  13. ^ "한국 해군의 소해작전". The War Memorial of Korea. Retrieved 9 April 2009. 
  14. ^ Haegun. South Korea: Republic of Korea Navy. November–December 2002. pp. 68–71. 
  15. ^ Military World, (October 1998)
  16. ^ Haegun Ilhwa (Navy episodes). Vol. 4, 1993, ROK Navy HQ

External links[edit]