List of Roman aqueducts by date

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For an overview of ancient aqueducts in Rome, see List of aqueducts in the city of Rome.

This is a list of aqueducts in Rome listed in chronological order of their construction.

Ancient Rome[edit]

Porta Maggiore, the junction of Aqua Claudio and Aqua Anio Novus with Aqua Marcia and Aqua Tepula
  • Aqua Appia
    • built in 311 B.C.
    • source: springs 10 miles (16 km) to the east of Rome
    • length: 10 miles (16 km); underground from its source for 7 miles (11 km), then on arches for 3 miles (4.8 km) to its terminus in the Forum Boarium in Campus Martius
  • Aqua Anio Vetus
    • built in 272 - 269 BC
    • source: Anio (Aniene) River near Vicovaro, east of Rome
    • length: 40 miles (64 km); underground channel of stone from its source to its terminus on the Viminal Hill
  • Aqua Marcia
    • built in 144 - 140 BC
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 56 miles (90 km); underground for 50 miles (80 km) from its source, then on arches for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus on the Capitoline Hill
    • later piped to the fantastic baths of Caracalla on the Caelian Hill by a branch called Aqua Antoniniana, then to the Aventine Hill and the Quirinal Hill
  • Aqua Tepula
    • built in 125 BC
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 11 miles (18 km); underground for 5 miles (8.0 km) from its source, then on the same arches as those of the Aqua Marcia for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus on the Aventine Hill
  • Aqua Julia
    • built in 33 BC
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 14 miles (23 km); underground for 7 miles (11 km) from its source, then on the same arches as those of the Aqua Marcia and Aqua Tepula to its terminus on the Aventine Hill
  • Aqua Virgo
    • built in 19 BC
    • source: springs near Via Collatina, east of Rome
    • length: 14 miles (23 km); underground for 7 miles (11 km) from its source, then on arches for 7 miles (11 km) to its terminus at the baths of Agrippa in Campus Martius
  • Aqua Alsietina
  • Aqua Claudia
    • built in AD 52
    • source: springs in Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 43 miles (69 km); underground for 34 miles (55 km) from its source, then on arches for 9 miles (14 km) to its terminus on the Caelian Hill
    • later piped to the imperial palaces from the mid-first century on the Palatine Hill
  • Aqua Anio Novus
    • built in AD 52
    • source: Anio (Aniene) River, east of Rome
    • length: 54 miles (87 km); underground for 46 miles (74 km) from its source, then on arches for 8 miles (13 km), entering Rome at Porta Maggiore, atop the channel of Aqua Claudia to its terminus on the Caelian Hill
  • Aqua Traiana
    • built in AD 109
    • source: springs to the north of Lake Bracciano, northwest of Rome
    • length: 35 miles (56 km); underground for 29 miles (47 km) from its source, then on arches for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus on the Janiculum Hill
  • Aqua Alexandrina
    • built in AD 226
    • source: the Pantano springs near Via Prenestina, east of Rome
    • length: 14 miles (23 km); underground for 4 miles (6.4 km) from its source, then on arches for 10 miles (16 km) to its terminus at the baths of Alexander Severus in Campus Martius

Modern Rome[edit]

  • Acqua Vergine Antica
    • built in 1453
    • source: springs in Salone, east of Rome
    • length: 8 miles (13 km); underground from its source to its terminus at the fountain of Trevi on the Quirinal Hill
  • Acqua Felice
    • built in 1586
    • source: springs at Pantano Borghese, off Via Casilina
    • length: 15 miles (24 km); underground for 8 miles (13 km) from its source, in the channel of Aqua Alexandrina, then alternating on the arches of the Aqua Claudia and the Aqua Marcia for 7 miles (11 km) to its terminus at the fountain of Moses on the Quirinal Hill
  • Acqua Paola
    • built in 1611
    • source: Lake Bracciano, northwest of Rome
    • length: 20 miles (32 km); underground for 12 miles (19 km) from its source, in the channel of Aqua Trajana, then on arches for 8 miles (13 km) to its terminus at the fountain of Paul V on the Janiculum Hill,
    • later piped to Vatican Hill
  • Acqua Pia Antica Marcia
    • built in 1870
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 56 miles (90 km); underground for 50 miles (80 km) in the channel of Aqua Marcia, then on arches for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus at the fountain of the Naiads on the Viminal Hill
  • Acqua Vergine Nuova
    • built in 1937
    • source: springs in Salone, east of Rome
    • length: 8 miles (13 km); underground from its source to its terminus at the fountains in Piazza del Popolo and the fountains on the western slope of the Pincio, overlooking Piazza del Popolo
  • Acqua Peschiera
    • built in 1949
    • source: springs in Sorgenti, northeast of Rome
    • length: 60 miles (97 km); underground from its source, splitting into two branches:
      • Peschiera Sinistra, approaching Rome from the east
      • Peschiera Destra, taking a westward route, crossing the Tiber River at Poggio Mireto Scalo, about 30 miles north of Rome to its terminus at the fountain of Piazzale degli Eroi (Italian: Heroes' Square), just north of Vatican Hill[1]
  • Acqua Appio-Allesandrino[2]
    • built in 1965
    • source: catchment basins along the volcano Angela at Pantano Borghese, Finocchi, Torre Angela

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bizzotto, Prof. Arch. Renata (Editor) & Mancuso, (With the cooperation of). "The post-unification aqueducts". www.architettiroma.it (in Italian). 
  2. ^ Bizzotto, Prof. Arch. Renata (Editor) & Mancuso, (With the cooperation of). "The post-unification aqueducts". www.architettiroma.it (in Italian). 

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]