List of Russian dishes

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Zakuski in Russia

This is a list of notable dishes found in Russian cuisine.[1] Russian cuisine is a collection of the different cooking traditions of the Russian peoples. The cuisine is diverse, with Northeast European/Baltic, Caucasian, Central Asian, Siberian, East Asian and Middle Eastern influences.[2] Russian cuisine derives its varied character from the vast and multi-ethnic expanse of Russia.

Russian dishes[edit]

Name Image Description
Beef Stroganoff Beef Stroganoff-02 cropped.jpg Pieces of sautéed beef in sauce, with smetana (sour cream)[3]
Blini Blini with beef.jpg Pancakes of various thickness and ingredients[4][5]
Caviar Ossetra caviar.jpg Processed, salted roe, often of sturgeon[6]
Chicken Kiev Chicken Kiev - Ukrainian East Village restaurant.jpg French-inspired chicken cutlet with butter sauce as filling[7]
Coulibiac Russian Coulibiac with Cabbage.jpg A fish (usually salmon or sturgeon) loaf, with rice, hard-boiled eggs, mushrooms, and dill[8]
Dressed herring Selidi pod shuboi.jpg Diced, salted herring covered with layers of grated, boiled vegetables (potatoes, carrots, beet roots), chopped onions, and mayonnaise[9][5]
Golubtsy Golubzi4.jpg Cooked cabbage leaves wrapped around a variety of fillings[10][5]
Guriev porridge Gurievskaya porridge photo 05-2017.jpg A Russian porridge dish prepared from semolina and milk with the addition of nuts (hazelnut, walnuts, almonds), kaimak (creamy foams) and dried fruits.[11]
Kasha Гречневая каша.jpg Porridge. Buckwheat,[12] millet, oat, wheat and semolina kashas are widely popular in Russia,[13][5] especially as children's food
Kissel Red Currant Kissel.jpg Fruit dessert of sweetened juice, thickened with arrowroot, cornstarch or potato starch[14]
Knish Lower East Side - Schimmel Knish 2.jpg A baked or fried potato dumpling made of flaky dough[15][16]
Kholodets Holodez s hrenom.JPG A meat jelly that is also known as studen[5][17]
Kulich Kulich pies.JPG One of the two sine qua non attributes of the Russian Easter (the other is Paskha).[18] A type of Easter bread.[18]
Makarony po-flotski Макароны по-флотски.JPG Literally navy-style pasta, a dish made of cooked pasta (typically macaroni, penne or fusilli) mixed with stewed ground meat, fried onions and seasoned with salt and black pepper.
Mimosa salad Mimoza salat e-citizen.jpg A festive salad, whose main ingredients are cheese, eggs, canned fish, onion, and mayonnaise[citation needed]
Okroshka Kvass-okroshka.jpg Cold soup of mostly raw vegetables like cucumbers, spring onions, boiled potatoes, with eggs, and a cooked meat such as beef, veal, sausages, or ham with kvas, topped with sour cream[19]
Oladyi Russian oladyi, Bob Bob Ricard, Soho, London.jpg Small thick pancakes[20]
Olivier salad Russischer Oliviersalat.JPG Diced potatoes, eggs, chicken or bologna, sweet peas, and pickles with a mayonnaise dressing. Other vegetables, such as carrot or fresh cucumbers, can be added.[21][5]
Paskha Paskha2.jpg Tvorog (farmer's cheese) plus heavy cream, butter, sugar, vanilla, etc., usually molded in the form of a truncated pyramid. Traditional for Easter.
Pelmeni Pelmeni Russian.jpg Dumplings consisting of a meat filling wrapped in thin, pasta dough[22][23][5]
Pirog Fish pie.JPG A pie either with a sweet or savoury filling[24]
Pirozhki Piroshki.JPG Small pies[25][5]
Pozharsky cutlet Pozharsky cutlet A breaded ground chicken patty[26]
Rassolnik Rassolnik.jpg A soup made from pickled cucumbers, pearl barley, and pork or beef kidneys[27]
Shchi Schi.jpg A cabbage soup.[28] Also can be based on sauerkraut.[28] Kislye Shchi (sour shchi) despite its name is a fizzy beverage similar to kvass, usually with honey.
Solyanka Soljanka with olives.jpg A thick, spicy and sour soup that contains fish and pickled cucumbers[29]
Sorrel soup Sorrel soup with egg and croutons (Zupa szczawiowa z jajkiem i grzankami).jpg Water or broth, sorrel leaves, salt, sometimes with whole eggs or egg yolks, potatoes, carrots, parsley root, and rice[30][31]
Syrniki Syrniki6.jpg Fried pancakes made of quark, usually topped with sour cream, varenye, jam, honey, or apple sauce[32][33]
Ukha Опеканная уха.JPG A clear soup, made from various types of fish[34]
Vatrushka Vatrushka.jpg A pastry with a ring of dough and sweet farmer's cheese in the middle[35]
Veal Orlov French meat.jpg A dish invented by the French[36] consisting of braised loin of veal, thinly sliced, filled with a thin layer of pureed mushrooms and onions between each slice, topped with bechamel sauce and cheese. Various versions of this dish usually go by the name French-style meat in Russia today.
Vinegret Vinegret.jpg Diced boiled vegetables (beet roots, potatoes, carrots), chopped onions, and sauerkraut and/or pickled cucumbers.[37][38][39] Other ingredients, such as green peas or beans, are sometimes also added.[38][39] Dressed with vinaigrette or simply with sunflower or other vegetable oil.
Zakuski Russian Celebration Zakuski.jpg Refers to a variety of hors d'oeuvres, snacks, appetizers, usually served buffet style.[40] It often includes cold cuts, cured fishes, mixed salads, kholodets, various pickled vegetables and mushrooms, pirozhki, caviar, deviled eggs, open sandwiches, canapés and breads.[40]

Unsorted dishes[edit]

A kurnik filled with slices of chicken, mushrooms, blini, rice and eggs

Beverages[edit]

Name Image Description
Acidophiline A type of drinkable yogurt, with Lactobacillus acidophilus as the starter culture. Kefir yeast is also added.[41]
Kvass Mint bread kvas.jpg A fermented non-alcoholic beverage made from black or regular rye bread or dough[42]
Medovukha Медовуха.jpg A traditional Russian honey-based drink analogous to its counterparts of other Indo-European peoples[43]
Mors Mors (ru. Морс - прохладительный негазированный напиток).JPG A non-carbonated Russian fruit drink[44][45][46] prepared from berries, mainly from lingonberry and cranberry (although sometimes blueberries, strawberries or raspberries).
Sbiten Сбитень (збитень) ржаной.JPG A traditional Russian honey-based drink similar to Medovukha[47]
Stewler Варенец.jpg A fermented milk product that is popular in Russia.[48][49] Similar to ryazhenka, it is made by adding sour cream (smetana) to baked milk.[49]
Tarasun An alcoholic beverage drunk by the Buryat people of Siberia. Apart from being the national drink of Buryatia, it is also used by the Buryats in their religious ceremonies.[50][51]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Classic Russian Cooking, Elena Molokhovets ("A Gift to Young Housewives"), Indiana University Press, 1992, ISBN 0-253-36026-9
  2. ^ "The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  3. ^ Von Bremzen, A.; Welchman, J. (1990). Please to the Table: The Russian Cookbook. Workman Pub. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-89480-753-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  4. ^ "Meet the Man Who's Building a Fast-Casual Blini Empire". Food & Wine. December 15, 2017. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h "Don't Miss These 10 Russian Dishes When Going To The World Cup". caspiannews.com. November 29, 2017. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  6. ^ Mitchell, C. (2009). Passport Russia 3rd Ed., eBook. World Trade Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-1-60780-027-9. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  7. ^ Saveur. Meigher Communications. 2001. pp. 33–34. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  8. ^ Vos, H. (2010). Passion of a Foodie - An International Kitchen Companion. Strategic Book Publishing. p. 158. ISBN 978-1-934925-63-8. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  9. ^ Calzolaio, Scott (December 19, 2017). "What's cooking this holiday season". Milford Daily News. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  10. ^ Mack, G.R.; Surina, A. (2005). Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia. Food culture around the world. Greenwood Press. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-313-32773-5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  11. ^ Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 597. ISBN 978-0-19-931362-4. Retrieved July 22, 2017.
  12. ^ Molokhovets, E.; Toomre, J. (1998). Classic Russian Cooking: Elena Molokhovets' a Gift to Young Housewives. Indiana-Michigan Series in Rus. Indiana University Press. p. 334. ISBN 978-0-253-21210-8. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  13. ^ Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. p. 126. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  14. ^ Russian History: Histoire Russe. University Center for International Studies, University of Pittsburgh. 1995. pp. 20–21. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  15. ^ "Recipe: Knish – The Carbohydrate-Laden Jewish Comfort Food". The Moscow Times. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  17. ^ Encyclopaedia of Contemporary Russian. Taylor & Francis. 2013. p. 296. ISBN 978-1-136-78786-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  19. ^ Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. p. 125. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  20. ^ Lonely Planet Russia. Travel Guide. Lonely Planet Publications. 2015. p. pt327. ISBN 978-1-74360-501-1. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  21. ^ Perianova, I. (2013). The Polyphony of Food: Food through the Prism of Maslow’s Pyramid. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. p. 137. ISBN 978-1-4438-4511-3. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  22. ^ Barber, C. (2015). Pierogi Love: New Takes on an Old-World Comfort Food. Gibbs Smith. p. 42. ISBN 978-1-4236-4066-0. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  23. ^ Russian Travel Monthly: A Publication of Russian Information Services, Inc. Russian Information Services. 1994. pp. 4–5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  25. ^ Petrovskaya, K.; Wayne, K.P. (1992). Russian Cookbook. Dover. p. 143. ISBN 978-0-486-27329-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  26. ^ Art & Auction. Art & Auction Magazine. 2004. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  28. ^ a b Wright, C.A. (2011). The Best Soups in the World. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. pt51. ISBN 978-0-544-17779-6. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  29. ^ Sheraton, M.; Alexander, K. (2015). 1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die: A Food Lover's Life List. 1,000-- before you die book. Workman Publishing. pp. 420–421. ISBN 978-0-7611-4168-6. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  30. ^ Gorina, R. (1945). Russian Fare: A Selection of Recipes. New Europe Publishing Company Limited. p. 6. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  32. ^ Jones, C.C. (2013). A Year Of Russian Feasts. Transworld. p. pt82. ISBN 978-1-4464-8878-2. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  34. ^ Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  35. ^ Encyclopaedia of Contemporary Russian. Taylor & Francis. 2013. p. 136. ISBN 978-1-136-78786-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  36. ^ Schultze, S. (2000). Culture and Customs of Russia. Culture and Customs of Europe. Greenwood Press. p. 62. ISBN 978-0-313-31101-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  39. ^ a b Л. Я. Старовойт, М. С. Косовенко, Ж. М. Смирнова, Кулінарія, Київ, Вища школа, 1992, с. 218 (L. Ya. Starovoit, M. S. Kosovenko, Zh. M. Smirnova, Cookery, Kiev, Vyscha Shkola publishing house, 1992, p. 218)
  40. ^ a b Schultze, S. (2000). Culture and Customs of Russia. Culture and Customs of Europe. Greenwood Press. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-313-31101-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  41. ^ "Ацидофилин". Kulina.ru. Retrieved 2017-12-23.
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  44. ^ "ЭСБЕ/Морс — Викитека". ru.wikisource.org. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  45. ^ SRAS.ORG. "Mors: Russian Fruit Drink". www.sras.org. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
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  49. ^ a b translated; introduced,; Toomre, annotated by Joyce (1998). Classic Russian cooking : Elena Molokhovets' A gift to young housewives (1st paperback ed.). Bloomington: Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-21210-8.
  50. ^ Curtin, p 28
  51. ^ Fridman, Eva Jane Neumann (2004). Sacred Geography: Shamanism among the Buddhist peoples of Russia. Akadémiai Kiadó. p. 207. ISBN 9630581140.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Curtin, Jeremiah (1909). A journey in Southern Siberia. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.