List of Seattle Seahawks seasons

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This article is a compilation of the list of seasons completed by the Seattle Seahawks American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Seahawks' franchise from 1976 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. As of the end of the 2016 NFL season, the Seahawks have 21 winning seasons, 17 losing seasons, and 4 seasons where they finished 8–8. With a 35–6 Week 14 win over the Baltimore Ravens on December 13 during the 2015 season, not only did the Seahawks improved to 8–5 at that point in the season, but the Seahawks' all–time franchise regular season win–loss record improved to 313–312–0; this marked the first time ever in team history that the Seahawks have had an overall winning regular season win–loss record (a win–loss record above .500). The Seahawks are the one of four North American men's professional sports teams that have played in Seattle with an all–time winning record, after the Seattle Metropolitans (the first American team to win the Stanley Cup in 1917, folded in 1924), the Seattle SuperSonics (who relocated to Oklahoma City and became the Thunder in the summer of 2008), and the Seattle Sounders FC (established in 2007 as an expansion franchise, currently active). Therefore, the Seahawks are currently one of two active North American men's professional sports team located in Seattle with an overall winning record. On October 23, 2016, the Seahawks played the Arizona Cardinals at University of Phoenix Stadium and the game ended in a 6–6 tie after OT, which was the first time this ever happened in franchise history.

Seasons[edit]

Super Bowl Champions Conference Champions Division Champions Wild Card Berth
Season Team League Conference Division Regular season Postseason results Awards Head coaches
Finish Wins Losses Ties W %
1976 1976 NFL NFC West 5th 2 12 0 .143 Jack Patera
1977 1977 NFL AFC West 4th 5 9 0 .357
1978[1] 1978 NFL AFC West 2nd 9 7 0 .563 Jack Patera (COY)
1979 1979 NFL AFC West 3rd 9 7 0 .563
1980 1980 NFL AFC West 5th 4 12 0 .250
1981 1981 NFL AFC West 5th 6 10 0 .375
1982[2] 1982 NFL AFC 8th[3] 4 5 0 .444 Jack Patera (0–2)
Mike McCormack (4–3)
1983 1983 NFL AFC West 2nd[4] 9 7 0 .563 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Broncos) 31–7
Won Divisional Playoffs (at Dolphins) 27–20
Lost AFC Championship (at Raiders) 14–30
Chuck Knox
1984 1984 NFL AFC West 2nd 12 4 0 .750 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Raiders) 13–7
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Dolphins) 10–31
Chuck Knox (COY)
Kenny Easley (DPOY)
1985 1985 NFL AFC West 3rd 8 8 0 .500
1986 1986 NFL AFC West 2nd[5] 10 6 0 .625
1987[6] 1987 NFL AFC West 2nd 9 6 0 .600 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Oilers) 20–23 (OT)
1988 1988 NFL AFC West 1st 9 7 0 .563 Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bengals) 13–21 Steve Largent (WP MOY)
1989 1989 NFL AFC West 4th 7 9 0 .438
1990 1990 NFL AFC West 3rd[7] 9 7 0 .563
1991 1991 NFL AFC West 4th 7 9 0 .438
1992 1992 NFL AFC West 5th 2 14 0 .125 Cortez Kennedy (DPOY) Tom Flores
1993 1993 NFL AFC West 5th 6 10 0 .375
1994 1994 NFL AFC West 5th 6 10 0 .375
1995 1995 NFL AFC West 3rd 8 8 0 .500 Dennis Erickson
1996 1996 NFL AFC West 4th 7 9 0 .438
1997' 1997 NFL AFC West 3rd 8 8 0 .500
1998 1998 NFL AFC West 2nd 8 8 0 .500
1999 1999 NFL AFC West 1st[8] 9 7 0 .563 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Dolphins) 17–20 Mike Holmgren
2000 2000 NFL AFC West 4th 6 10 0 .375
2001 2001 NFL AFC West 2nd 9 7 0 .563
2002 2002 NFL NFC West 3rd 7 9 0 .438
2003 2003 NFL NFC West 2nd 10 6 0 .625 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (at Packers) 27–33 (OT)
2004 2004 NFL NFC West 1st 9 7 0 .563 Lost Wild Card Playoffs (Rams) 20–27
2005 2005 NFL NFC West 1st 13 3 0 .813 Won Divisional Playoffs (Redskins) 20–10
Won NFC Championship (Panthers) 34–14
Lost Super Bowl XL (vs. Steelers) 10–21
Shaun Alexander (MVP, OPOY)
2006 2006 NFL NFC West 1st 9 7 0 .563 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Cowboys) 21–20
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 24–27 (OT)
2007 2007 NFL NFC West 1st 10 6 0 .625 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Redskins) 35–14
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Packers) 20–42
2008 2008 NFL NFC West 3rd 4 12 0 .250
2009 2009 NFL NFC West 3rd 5 11 0 .313 Jim L. Mora
2010 2010 NFL NFC West 1st 7 9 0 .438 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Saints) 41–36
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Bears) 24–35
Pete Carroll
2011 2011 NFL NFC West 3rd 7 9 0 .438
2012 2012 NFL NFC West 2nd 11 5 0 .688 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Redskins) 24–14
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 28–30
2013 2013 NFL NFC West 1st 13 3 0 .813 Won Divisional Playoffs (Saints) 23–15
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 23–17
Won Super Bowl XLVIII (1) (vs. Broncos) 43–8
Malcolm Smith (SB MVP)
2014 2014 NFL NFC West 1st 12 4 0 .750 Won Divisional Playoffs (Panthers) 31–17
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 28–22 (OT)
Lost Super Bowl XLIX (vs. Patriots) 24–28
2015 2015 NFL NFC West 2nd 10 6 0 .625 Won Wild Card Playoffs (at Vikings) 10–9
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Panthers) 24–31
2016 2016 NFL NFC West 1st 10 5 1 .656 Won Wild Card Playoffs (Lions) 26–6
Lost Divisional Playoffs (at Falcons) 20–36
2017 2017 NFL NFC West 2nd 9 7 0 .563
Totals
10 Division Titles
3 NFC Titles
1 NFL Title
Regular Season 334 325 1 .508
Postseason 16 15 0 .516
Overall 350 340 1 .507

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The NFL expanded from a 14-game regular season schedule to 16 beginning in 1978.
  2. ^ The 1982 season was shortened to nine games by a players' strike. The top eight teams in each conference advanced to the playoffs.
  3. ^ The Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns and Buffalo Bills finished with 4–5 records. Cleveland's better conference record (4–3 vs. Buffalo's 3–3 and Seattle's 3–5 advanced the Browns to the playoffs. The Bills and Seahawks did not go to the playoffs.
  4. ^ The Seattle Seahawks, Cleveland Browns and Denver Broncos finished with 9–7 records. Seattle's and Denver's better head-to-head record (2–1 vs. Cleveland's 0–2) eliminated the Browns from the playoffs. Seattle's better conference record (5–3 vs. 3–5) gave the Seahawks the 1st Wild Card and Denver the 2nd Wild Card.
  5. ^ The Seattle Seahawks, New York Jets, Kansas City Chiefs and Cincinnati Bengals finished with 10–6 records. New York and Kansas City advanced to the playoffs as Wild Cards based on better conference records (8–4 and 9–5 vs. Seattle's and Cincinnati's 7–5). The Seahawks and Bengals did not go to the playoffs.
  6. ^ The 1987 season was shortened to 15 games by a players' strike.
  7. ^ The Seattle Seahawks, Houston Oilers and Pittsburgh Steelers finished with 9–7 records. Houston's better conference record (8–4 vs. Seattle's 7–5 and Pittsburgh's 6–6) gave the Oilers the Wild Card and eliminated the Seahawks and Steelers from the playoffs.
  8. ^ The Seattle Seahawks and Kansas City Chiefs finished with 9–7 records. Seattle's head-to-head sweep of the Chiefs gave the Seahawks the division championship. The Chiefs did not go to the playoffs.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • "NFL History: Yearly Standings". NFL History. NFL Enterprises, LLC. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-13.
  • "Seattle Seahawks (1976–present)". Sports E-cyclopedia. Tank Productions. 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-13.
  • "Seahawks History". Football @ JT-SW.com. John Troan. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-14.