List of Sites of Special Scientific Interest in Bedfordshire

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Bedfordshire is a county in the East of England.[1] It is bounded by Hertfordshire to the south-east, Cambridgeshire to the north-east, Northamptonshire to the north, and Buckinghamshire to the west.[2] It has an area of 1,235 square kilometres (477 sq mi), and population estimated in 2015 at 630,000, with an increase of 10% over the previous ten years.[3] The county town is Bedford, and the name is first recorded in the treaty in about 879 between King Alfred the Great and Guthrum, which divided English and Danish territory by a line which went through Bedford.[4]

Southern Bedfordshire is part of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. North and mid Bedfordshire are undulating claylands with broad river valleys of the River Great Ouse and its tributaries, and the Bedfordshire Greensand Ridge. Jurassic and Cretaceous clays are overlaid by Quaternary glacial deposits of chalky boulder clay.[5]

There are forty Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) in Bedfordshire, designated by Natural England. Thirty-five are listed for their biological interest, and five for their geological interest.[6] Three of the sites are also National nature reserves, twelve are in the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and eleven are managed wholly or partly by the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. In 2009 Bedfordshire was divided into three unitary local authorities: thirty-two sites are in Central Bedfordshire, eight in Bedford and none in Luton.

Key[edit]

Interest[edit]

  • B = a site of biological interest
  • G = a site of geological interest

Other classifications[edit]

Sites[edit]

Site name Photograph B G Area[a] Public access Location[a] Other classifications Map[a] Citation[a] Description
Barton Hills Barton Hills Green tickY 47.9 hectares (118 acres) YES Barton-le-Clay
51°57′22″N 0°25′05″W / 51.956°N 0.418°W / 51.956; -0.418 (Barton Hills), TL088298
NNR[7] NCR[8] CAONB[8] Map Citation This is steeply sloping chalk pasture, which has a wide variety of grasses and flowers. A chalk stream along the valley floor adds wetland flora. Six orchid species have been recorded, including the fragrant orchid and bee orchid. Another notable plant is the pasque flower.[8]
Biddenham Pit Biddenham Pit Green tickY 0.4 hectares (0.99 acres) YES Biddenham
52°08′31″N 0°30′25″W / 52.142°N 0.507°W / 52.142; -0.507 (Biddenham Pit), TL023503
GCR[9] Map Citation This site has interglacial mollusk and mammal fossils, but it is uncertain which warmer period is represented. The lowest level also has Paleolithic stone tools.[9]
Blow's Down Blow's Down Green tickY 33.4 hectares (83 acres) YES Dunstable
51°52′59″N 0°30′07″W / 51.883°N 0.502°W / 51.883; -0.502 (Blow's Down), TL032215
WTBCN[10] CAONB[11] Map Citation The site has varied habitats with a large area of unimproved grassland, which cattle help to maintain. Features include a disused quarry and medieval cultivation terraces. It has a rare plant, Bunium bulbocastanum, and beetle odontaeus armiger.[12]
Cooper's Hill Cooper's Hill Green tickY 17.8 hectares (44 acres) YES Ampthill
52°01′44″N 0°30′14″W / 52.029°N 0.504°W / 52.029; -0.504 (Cooper's Hill), TL027378
LNR[13] WTBCN[14] Map Citation The site is described by Natural England as the best surviving example in Bedfordshire of heathland on the thin acidic soils of the Lower Greensand Ridge. It also has areas of marsh and woodland.[15]
Deacon Hill SSSI Deacon Hill Green tickY 35.4 hectares (87 acres) YES Pegsdon
51°57′11″N 0°22′12″W / 51.953°N 0.37°W / 51.953; -0.37 (Deacon Hill), TL121295
WTBCN[16][17] CAONB[18] Map Citation The site is calcareous grassland which is rich in plant species, some of which are uncommon.[19] Birds include lapwings and buzzards, and there are butterflies such as dingy and grizzled skippers. There are also the remains of ancient strip lynchet fields.[16]
Double Arches Pit Double Arches Pit Green tickY 1.7 hectares (4.2 acres) NO Heath and Reach
51°57′11″N 0°38′28″W / 51.953°N 0.641°W / 51.953; -0.641 (Double Arches Pit), SP935291
GCR[19] Map Citation This site exposes the Lower Greensand geological layer, dating to the Lower Cretaceous around 146 to 100 million years ago.[20]
Dropshort Marsh Dropshort Marsh Green tickY 2.7 hectares (6.7 acres) YES Toddington
51°56′17″N 0°32′24″W / 51.938°N 0.54°W / 51.938; -0.54 (Dropshort Marsh), TL005276
WTBCN[21] Map Citation This marsh has a variety of habitats, including a scarce quaking bog. Many species are now uncommon due to changes in agricultural practices. it has several springs, with floating sweet-grass and brooklime and areas dominated by rushes.[22]
Dunstable and Whipsnade Downs Dunstable Downs Green tickY 73.3 hectares (181 acres) YES Dunstable
51°52′08″N 0°32′24″W / 51.869°N 0.540°W / 51.869; -0.540 (Dunstable Downs), TL006199
51°51′29″N 0°33′07″W / 51.858°N 0.552°W / 51.858; -0.552 (Whipsnade Downs), SP998187
NT[23] CAONB[23] Map Citation This is a 3 kilometre long steep escarpment between Dunstable and Whipsnade. The slopes have a typical chalk downland flora, and there are also habitats of scrub and tall herbs. The site is also important for butterflies.[24]
Fancott Woods and Meadows Fancott Woods and Meadows Green tickY 13.2 hectares (33 acres) YES Toddington
51°56′13″N 0°30′36″W / 51.937°N 0.51°W / 51.937; -0.51 (Fancott Woods and Meadows), TL025275
WTBCN[25] Map Citation The meadows are mainly ancient ridge and furrow, and are unimproved neutral grassland traditionally managed for hay and grazing. Plants include cowslips, ragged-robin, great burnet, common spotted orchid, red fescue, meadow fescue and meadowsweet.[25][26]
Felmersham Gravel Pits Felmersham Gravel Pits Green tickY 21.5 hectares (53 acres) YES Bedford
52°12′54″N 0°33′04″W / 52.215°N 0.551°W / 52.215; -0.551 (Felmersham Gravel Pits), SP991584
WTBCN[27] Map Citation The site has flooded gravel pits which were worked until about 1945. Other habitats are neutral grassland, scrub and broadleaved woodland.[28] It is one of the best sites in Bedfordshire for dragonflies and damselflies.[27]
Flitwick Moor Flitwick Moor Green tickY 58.9 hectares (146 acres) YES Flitwick
52°00′18″N 0°28′34″W / 52.005°N 0.476°W / 52.005; -0.476 (Flitwick Moor), TL047352
WTBCN[29] Map Citation This is a rich valley mire, and the largest area of wetland in Bedfordshire. Eight species of sphagnum bog moss have been recorded, including one which is nationally rare. The site has areas of woodland as well as wet grassland.[30]
Galley and Warden Hills Warden Hill Green tickY 47.5 hectares (117 acres) YES Warden Hills
51°55′41″N 0°24′54″W / 51.928°N 0.415°W / 51.928; -0.415 (Galley and Warden Hills), TL091267
LNR[31] CAONB[31] Map Citation The site is chalk grassland with areas of dense scrub, and it has many plants which are rare nationally and locally.[32] It has a wide variety of wild flowers and more than twenty species of butterflies.[33]
Hanger Wood Hanger Wood Green tickY 24.0 hectares (59 acres) NO Stagsden
52°08′02″N 0°32′46″W / 52.134°N 0.546°W / 52.134; -0.546 (Hanger Wood), SP996494
Map Citation This is described by Natural England as a Site of Special Scientific Interest having "one of the best remaining examples of wet ash-maple woodland in Bedfordshire". The ground flora is dominated by bluebell and dog's mercury, with bramble in drier areas.[34]
Houghton Regis Marl Lakes Houghton Regis Marl Lakes Green tickY 21.0 hectares (52 acres) YES Houghton Regis
51°53′56″N 0°32′10″W / 51.899°N 0.536°W / 51.899; -0.536 (Houghton Regis Marl Lakes), TL008233
WTBCN[35] CAONB[36] Map Citation This large disused chalk quarry is a rare example of standing water in chalk. It is important both ornithologically and for its range of dragonflies. There are two marl lakes, which have aquatic plants and molluscs, and there are fens in a waterlogged area between the lakes.[37]
Kensworth Chalk Pit Kensworth Chalk Pit Green tickY 130.9 hectares (323 acres) NO Kensworth
51°51′58″N 0°31′01″W / 51.866°N 0.517°W / 51.866; -0.517 (Kensworth Chalk Pit), TL022196
GCR[38] CAONB[39] Map Citation The site is a large working quarry which exposes fossiliferous chalk rocks with many rare fossils including ammonites. It is described by Natural England as "an unrivalled locality for stratigraphic studies in the Upper Cretaceous".[40][41]
Kings and Bakers Woods and Heaths King's Wood, Heath and Reach Green tickY 211.3 hectares (522 acres) YES Leighton Buzzard
51°57′36″N 0°39′18″W / 51.96°N 0.655°W / 51.96; -0.655 (Kings and Bakers Woods and Heaths), SP925299
NNR[7] NCR[42] WTBCN[43] Map Citation The site has the largest remaining area of woodland in Bedfordshire, together with lowland heath, acidic grassland and some small ponds. There are a number of rare plant species, including great woodrush, wood vetch and saw-wort.[44]
Kings Wood and Glebe Meadows, Houghton Conquest Glebe Meadows Green tickY 36.1 hectares (89 acres) YES Houghton Conquest
52°03′07″N 0°28′37″W / 52.052°N 0.477°W / 52.052; -0.477 (Kings Wood and Glebe Meadows, Houghton Conquest), TL045404
LNR[45] Map Citation This site is ancient ash and maple woodland on heavy clay, a habitat which has become rare in lowland England. It is biologically diverse, with a number of rare species. Glebe Meadows has a rich variety of species due to its traditional management.[46]
Knocking Hoe Knocking Hoe Green tickY 8.1 hectares (20 acres) YES Pegsdon
51°57′47″N 0°21′18″W / 51.963°N 0.355°W / 51.963; -0.355 (Knocking Hoe), TL131307
NNR[7] NCR[47] CAONB[48] Map Citation The site is a flat bottomed valley with steep sides. The unimproved chalk grassland has several nationally rare plants, including moon carrot, spotted catsear and pasque flower. The ancient strip lynchet field system is of archaeological interest.[49][50]
Marston Thrift Marston Thrift Green tickY 37.7 hectares (93 acres) YES Cranfield
52°03′54″N 0°34′59″W / 52.065°N 0.583°W / 52.065; -0.583 (Marston Thrift), SP972417
LNR[51] Map Citation

The site is ash and maple woodland on heavy clay, a habitat which has become scarce in lowland England. It also has areas of damp grassland, and a grassland valley. It is an important site for butterflies, including the rare black hairstreak.[51][52]

Maulden Church Meadow Maulden Church Meadow Green tickY 4.2 hectares (10 acres) YES Maulden
52°01′52″N 0°27′29″W / 52.031°N 0.458°W / 52.031; -0.458 (Maulden Church Meadow), TL059381
LNR[53] Map Citation The site is unimproved pasture on the Lower Greensand Ridge. Most of it is neutral grassland with many grass and herb species, and there are small areas of acidic grassland. An open pond has aquatic plants, while two ponds which have been filled in have a varied marsh vegetation.[54]
Maulden Heath Maulden Heath Green tickY 7.6 hectares (19 acres) YES Maulden
52°02′06″N 0°26′31″W / 52.035°N 0.442°W / 52.035; -0.442 (Maulden Heath), TL070386
Map Citation There are two separate meadows in the site. The eastern meadow has two ridges, which have short grass, a moss layer and many herbs. The western meadow is a steep-sided valley which has similar habitats.[55]
Maulden Wood and Pennyfather's Hill Maulden Wood Green tickY 148.4 hectares (367 acres) YES Maulden
52°02′24″N 0°26′28″W / 52.04°N 0.441°W / 52.04; -0.441 (Maulden Wood and Pennyfather's Hill), TL070391
Map Citation This is ancient mixed deciduous and coniferous woodland, with rides and ponds. It has a wide variety of invertebrates, including some which are nationally rare, such as the tiny moth, Dioryctria mutatella and three sawfly species.[56]
Nares Gladley Marsh Nares Gladley Marsh Green tickY 5.4 hectares (13 acres) NO Leighton Buzzard
51°56′24″N 0°40′55″W / 51.94°N 0.682°W / 51.94; -0.682 (Nares Gladley Marsh), SP907277
Map Citation The site is on the Lower Greensand in the valley of the River Ouzel. It has marshland with a number of springs, and it has rich plant communities. On higher areas there is acidic grassland.[57]
Nine Acres Pit Nine Acres Pit Green tickY 20.4 hectares (50 acres) NO Leighton Buzzard
51°56′20″N 0°38′06″W / 51.939°N 0.635°W / 51.939; -0.635 (Nine Acres Pit), SP939276
GCR[58] Map Citation This Lower Cretaceous site exposes layers dating to the Albian and Aptian, between 125 and 100 million years ago. It has one of the most diverse Albian fossils faunas in the world.[59]
Odell Great Wood Odell Great Wood Green tickY 85.9 hectares (212 acres) YES Odell
52°13′08″N 0°35′56″W / 52.219°N 0.599°W / 52.219; -0.599 (Odell Great Wood), SP958588
Map Citation This site is wet ash and maple woodland which has an exceptional variety of flora, such as wild daffodil and herb paris. Extensive rides add to its value for invertebrates and flowering plants.[60]
Potton Wood Potton Wood Green tickY 85.2 hectares (211 acres) YES Potton
52°08′06″N 0°10′26″W / 52.135°N 0.174°W / 52.135; -0.174 (Potton Wood), TL251501
Map Citation This wet wood is mainly ash and maple. It shrub layer has species indicative of ancient woodland, such as yellow archangel, wood millet and oxlip, a national rarity. The site also has species-rich rides, ponds and diverse bird species.[61]
Pulloxhill Marsh Pulloxhill Marsh Green tickY 5.1 hectares (13 acres) NO Pulloxhill
51°59′20″N 0°27′50″W / 51.989°N 0.464°W / 51.989; -0.464 (Pulloxhill Marsh), TL056334
Map Citation This marsh in a small valley has a wide variety of plant species, including some rare in the country, such as sharpflowered rush and blunt-flowered rush. It also has springs, neutral grassland in higher areas and mature hedgerows.[62]
Sandy Warren Sandy Warren Green tickY 16.4 hectares (41 acres) YES Sandy
52°07′05″N 0°15′43″W / 52.118°N 0.262°W / 52.118; -0.262 (Sandy Warren), TL191480
RSPB[63] Map Citation The site is heathland on the acidic soil of the Lower Greensand ridge, which is now comparatively rare. It also has areas of unimproved grassland and birch woodland. Additional habitats are damp areas and seasonal pools, which have some uncommon species such as distant sedge and carnation sedge.[63]
Smithcombe, Sharpenhoe and Sundon Hills Sharpenhoe Green tickY 87.5 hectares (216 acres) YES Sharpenhoe
51°57′25″N 0°26′46″W / 51.957°N 0.446°W / 51.957; -0.446 (Smithcombe, Sharpenhoe and Sundon Hills), TL069299
NT[64] CAONB[65] SM[64] Map Citation Much of the site is unimproved chalk grassland with many plants which are now rare. Orchids include Herminium monorchis and Aceras anthropophorum. There is also beech forest with a ground layer including primroses.[64]
Southill Lake and Woods Southill Lake Green tickY 25.6 hectares (63 acres) NO Southill
52°04′23″N 0°19′52″W / 52.073°N 0.331°W / 52.073; -0.331 (Southill Lake and Woods), TL145429
RHPG[66] Map Citation The wood is a wet valley of alder, fed by springs, and a small stream runs down to the lake. There is fen vegetation in more open areas. The lake has a characteristic population of breeding birds, and an island has one of only two surviving heronries in the county.[67]
Stevington Marsh Stevington Marsh Green tickY 7.6 hectares (19 acres) YES Pavenham
52°10′59″N 0°33′54″W / 52.183°N 0.565°W / 52.183; -0.565 (Stevington Marsh), SP982548
Map Citation The site is marshland along the banks of the River Great Ouse. The river, marshes and pastures form varied habitats. The marshes are floristically rich, with the largest one being dominated by great horsetail. The wetland communities and Jurassic limestone grassland are rare habitats in eastern England.[68]
Sundon Chalk Quarry Sundon Chalk Quarry Green tickY 26.8 hectares (66 acres) YES Upper Sundon
51°56′10″N 0°29′24″W / 51.936°N 0.49°W / 51.936; -0.49 (Sundon Chalk Quarry), TL039275
CAONB[69] Map Citation This site's varied habitats are fen, lakes, chalk grassland, scrub and woodland. Invertebrates include sixteen species of dragonfly and damselfly and twenty-one of butterfly. The site has the largest English colony of the Chiltern gentian.[70]
Swineshead Wood Swineshead Wood Green tickY 21.9 hectares (54 acres) YES Swineshead
52°17′20″N 0°26′46″W / 52.289°N 0.446°W / 52.289; -0.446 (Swineshead Wood), TL061668
WT[71] Map Citation The site is wet woodland which has structural and biological diversity. The most common trees are pedunculate oak and ash and on heavy clay, and bluebells and dog's mercury dominate the ground flora.[72]
Tebworth Marsh Tebworth Marsh Green tickY 5.7 hectares (14 acres) YES Toddington
51°57′00″N 0°34′23″W / 51.95°N 0.573°W / 51.95; -0.573 (Tebworth Marsh), SP982289
Map Citation This site is a base-rich marsh which has diverse plant life. It has springs along the edge of glacial gravel, and this produces wet marsh which is dominated by meadowsweet. Other habitats are neutral grassland, swamp carr woodland, mature ash woodland, a stream and hedgerows.[73]
Tilwick Meadow Tilwick Meadow Green tickY 3.6 hectares (8.9 acres) YES Thurleigh
52°11′49″N 0°25′59″W / 52.197°N 0.433°W / 52.197; -0.433 (Tilwick Meadow), TL072566
Map Citation The meadow is on the site of a medieval village abandoned during the Black Death. It is unimproved grassland on chalk boulder clay, and it has very rich flora on a habitat now rare nationally. Grass species include red fescue and sweet vernal-grass.[74]
Totternhoe Chalk Quarry Totternhoe Chalk Quarry Green tickY 13.5 hectares (33 acres) YES Totternhoe
51°53′28″N 0°34′08″W / 51.891°N 0.569°W / 51.891; -0.569 (Totternhoe Chalk Quarry), SP986224
CAONB[75] WTBCN[76] Map Citation This site is grass chalkland, which is a habitat under threat.There are a number of rare plant species, including great pignut, and butterflies such as the chalkhill blue and the nationally rare Duke of Burgundy.[77]
Totternhoe Knolls Totternhoe Knolls Green tickY 13.4 hectares (33 acres) YES Totternhoe
51°53′17″N 0°34′48″W / 51.888°N 0.58°W / 51.888; -0.58 (Totternhoe Knolls), SP978220
LNR[78] WTBCN[76] CAONB[75] Map Citation This is grassland with a rich variety of plant species, including some that are now rare. There are a number of orchids and a wide variety of invertebrates, including butterflies such as the common blue, chalkhill blue, and the scarce small blue and Duke of Burgundy.[79][80]
Totternhoe Stone Pit Totternhoe Stone Pit Green tickY 2.2 hectares (5.4 acres) NO Totternhoe
51°53′24″N 0°34′37″W / 51.89°N 0.577°W / 51.89; -0.577 (Totternhoe Stone Pit), SP980222
GCR[81] CAONB[75] Map Citation The site displays the base of the Totternhoe Stone. It is a lime mud with an extensive deposit of late Cretaceous shark teeth, some of species which have not been fully described, so it will be an important resource for further research.[82]
Wavendon Heath Ponds Wavendon Heath Ponds Green tickY 4.7 hectares (12 acres) YES Aspley Heath
51°59′42″N 0°38′49″W / 51.995°N 0.647°W / 51.995; -0.647 (Wavendon Heath Ponds), SP930338
Map Citation The site is acidic mire. It has three ponds which have unusual plant communities, two unimproved meadows, some damp birch woodland and a small stream.[83]
Yelden Meadows Yelden Meadows Green tickY 2.8 hectares (6.9 acres) NO Yelden
52°17′42″N 0°31′19″W / 52.295°N 0.522°W / 52.295; -0.522 (Yelden Meadows), TL009673
Map Citation The site is a rare example of neutral grassland on clay which has not been improved agriculturally. It is a flood meadow which has been maintained to provide hay with grazing during the winter, and it has a rich variety of plant species.[84]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Maps and citations for each site are taken from the Natural England database. The area and location of the site is shown on the citation. The listing is as on 10 December 2015.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "East of England". Office for National Statistics. Archived from the original on 13 January 2016. Retrieved 9 December 2015. 
  2. ^ "Your Guide to the Counties of England". Counties in England. Archived from the original on 10 October 2016. Retrieved 9 December 2015. 
  3. ^ "Bedfordshire Police". Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 9 December 2015. 
  4. ^ Page, William, ed. (1912). A History of the County of Bedford. 3. London: Victoria County History. p. 1. Archived from the original on 2015-04-02. 
  5. ^ "Bedfordshire and Cambridgeshire Claylands". National Character Area profile. Natural England. Archived from the original on 11 December 2015. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  6. ^ "Designated Sites View: SSSIs Bedfordshire". Natural England. Archived from the original on 24 November 2017. Retrieved 29 December 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c "Bedfordshire's National Nature Reserves". Natural England. Archived from the original on 1 October 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c "Barton Hills citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  9. ^ a b "Biddenham Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  10. ^ "Blow's Downs". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  11. ^ "Blows Downs Nature Reserve". Wildlife Extra. Archived from the original on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  12. ^ "Blow's Down citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  13. ^ "Coopers Hill - Bedfordshire SSSI". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 18 February 2013. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  14. ^ "Cooper's Hill". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  15. ^ "Cooper's Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  16. ^ a b "Pegsdon Hills and Hoo Bit". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  17. ^ "Map of Deacon Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original on 21 January 2016. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  18. ^ "Cycling in the Chilterns". Ordnance Survey. Archived from the original on 6 July 2015. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  19. ^ a b "Double Arches Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 25 August 2015. 
  20. ^ "Double Arches Pit citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 13 June 2016. 
  21. ^ "Dropshort Marsh". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 25 August 2015. 
  22. ^ "Dropshort Marsh citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 August 2015. 
  23. ^ a b "Dunstable Downs and Whipsnade Estate". National Trust. Archived from the original on 19 December 2015. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  24. ^ "Dunstable and Whipsnade Downs citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 August 2015. 
  25. ^ a b "Fancott Woods and Meadows". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 25 August 2015. 
  26. ^ "Fancott Woods and Meadows citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 August 2015. 
  27. ^ a b "Felmersham Gravel Pits". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  28. ^ "Felmersham Gravel Pits citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 7 April 2016. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  29. ^ "Flitwick Moor (& Folly Wood)". Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  30. ^ "Flitwick Moor citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  31. ^ a b "Galley and Warden Hills SSSI". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 18 February 2013. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 10 December 2015. 
  32. ^ "Galley and Warden Hills citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  33. ^ "Galley and Warden Hills SSSI". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. 18 February 2013. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 26 August 2015. 
  34. ^ "Hanger Wood citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 27 August 2015. 
  35. ^ Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire (January 2015). "A Nature Conservation Strategy for Central Bedfordshire" (PDF). Central Bedfordshire Council. pp. 27–28. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 23 August 2015. 
  36. ^ "Luton, Dunstable & Houghton Regis local transport plan 2006-2011" (PDF). Bedfordshire County Council. p. 18. Retrieved 10 December 2015. [permanent dead link]
  37. ^ "Houghton Regis Marl Lakes citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 23 August 2015. 
  38. ^ "Kensworth Chalk Pit". British Upper Cretaceous Stratigraphy (PDF). Joint Nature Conservation Committee. 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-12-22. 
  39. ^ "Kensworth Parish Green Infrastructure Plan" (PDF). Bedfordshire Rural Communities Charity. Archived (PDF) from the original on 22 December 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015. 
  40. ^ "Kensworth Chalk Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 23 August 2015. 
  41. ^ "Chalk Places to Visit in Bedfordshire". Geo-East. Archived from the original on 9 August 2016. Retrieved 23 August 2015. 
  42. ^ "Kings and Bakers Woods and Heaths citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 27 August 2015. 
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Coordinates: 52°05′N 0°25′W / 52.083°N 0.417°W / 52.083; -0.417