List of Sites of Special Scientific Interest in West Sussex

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West Sussex is in south-east England and it has a population of approximately 780,000.[1] The county town is Chichester. In the north of the county are the heavy clays and sands of the Weald. The chalk of the South Downs runs across the centre from east to west and in the south a coastal plain runs down to the English Channel.[2]

In England, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) are designated by Natural England, which is responsible for protecting England's natural environment. The most important wildlife and geological sites are designated as SSSIs in order to give them legal protection.[3]

As of July 2019 there are 77 SSSIs in West Sussex,[4] of which 53 are biological, 18 are geological and 6 are both biological and geological. Twenty-four are Geological Conservation Review sites, fifteen are Nature Conservation Review sites, ten are Special Areas of Conservation, six are Special Protection Areas, five are internationally important Ramsar wetland sites, two are National Nature Reserves, seven are Local Nature Reserves, parts of six are Scheduled Monuments, ten are managed by the Sussex Wildlife Trust and one, which is partly in Surrey, is managed by the Surrey Wildlife Trust.


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Key[edit]

Sites[edit]

Site name Photograph B G Area[a] Public access Location[a] Other classifications Map[b] Citation[c] Description
Adur Estuary Adur Estuary Green tickY 60.3 hectares
(149 acres)
[5]
PP Shoreham-by-Sea
50°50′10″N 0°17′10″W / 50.836°N 0.286°W / 50.836; -0.286 (Adur Estuary)
TQ 208 055
[5]
Map Citation The estuary has large areas of saltmarsh. Sea purslane is dominant above the mean high water mark and glasswort below. There are also intertidal mudflats which are nationally important for ringed plovers. Other birds include redshanks and dunlin.[6]
Amberley Mount to Sullington Hill Amberley Mount to Sullington Hill Green tickY 177.2 hectares
(438 acres)
[7]
PP Pulborough
50°54′04″N 0°29′49″W / 50.901°N 0.497°W / 50.901; -0.497 (Amberley Mount to Sullington Hill)
TQ 058 124
[7]
Map Citation This site has chalk grassland and scrub on the slope of the South Downs. It has several unusual butterflies, moths and snails, including the rare adonis blue butterfly and the light feathered rustic and juniper carpet moths.[8]
Amberley Wild Brooks Amberley Wild Brooks Green tickY 327.5 hectares
(809 acres)
[9]
PP Pulborough
50°55′05″N 0°31′55″W / 50.918°N 0.532°W / 50.918; -0.532 (Amberley Wild Brooks)
TQ 033 142
[9]
NCR[9] Ramsar[10] SAC[11] SPA[12] SWT[13] Map Citation This area of grazing marsh, which is dissected by drainage ditches, has a number of uncommon invertebrates, particularly dragonflies, and 156 species of flowering plants have been recorded. It is also important for wintering birds, with nationally significant numbers of teal, shoveler and Bewick’s swan. There are two rare snails, Anisus vorticulus and Pseudamnicola confusa.[14]
Ambersham Common Ambersham Common Green tickY 141.6 hectares
(350 acres)
[15]
YES Midhurst
50°58′01″N 0°42′25″W / 50.967°N 0.707°W / 50.967; -0.707 (Ambersham Common)
SU 909 194
[15]
NCR[16] Map Citation This site is mainly heathland with a wide range of invertebrates, including the nationally rare Ectemnius borealis, a digger wasp which has only been found at three British sites. There are also areas of bog and acid carr. It has a wide variety of bird species, including some which are rare, such as nightjars, woodlarks and Dartford warblers.[17]
Arun Banks Arun Banks Green tickY 25.8 hectares
(64 acres)
[18]
PP Arundel
50°52′52″N 0°32′31″W / 50.881°N 0.542°W / 50.881; -0.542 (Arun Banks)
TQ 027 101
[18]
Map Citation This site consists of a tidal stretch of the River Arun and a cut-off meander loop. The diverse flora includes reed sweet grass, sea club-rush and glaucous bulrush. The river banks have wet grassland, scrub, woodland and drainage ditches with tall fen.[19]
Arundel Park Arundel Park Green tickY 134.0 hectares
(331 acres)
[20]
YES Arundel
50°52′23″N 0°33′54″W / 50.873°N 0.565°W / 50.873; -0.565 (Arundel Park)
TQ 011 091
[20]
Map Citation This old deer park on the chalk of the South Downs has an ancient artificial body of water, Swanbourne Lake. The site is described by Natural England as one of the most important sites in the country for invertebrates. There are fifteen endangered species, including the field cricket Gryllus campestris and the beetle Laemophloeus monilis. Another rarity is the mollusc Pseudamnicola confusa. There is also a diverse breeding bird community.[21]
Beeding Hill to Newtimber Hill Beeding Hill to Newtimber Hill Green tickY Green tickY 321.0 hectares
(793 acres)
[22]
PP Henfield
50°53′13″N 0°13′26″W / 50.887°N 0.224°W / 50.887; -0.224 (Beeding Hill to Newtimber Hill)
TQ 250 112
[22]
GCR[23][24] NCR[25] Map Citation Most of this site on the slope of the South Downs is unimproved chalk grassland, which has a diverse flora with around 40 flowering plants per square metre. Invertebrates include a nationally important assemblage of harvestmen. Devil's Dyke is geologically important as an example of Pleistocene erosion of a dry chalk valley.[26]
Bognor Common Quarry Bognor Common Quarry Green tickY 25.1 hectares
(62 acres)
[27]
YES Pulborough
50°58′59″N 0°33′50″W / 50.983°N 0.564°W / 50.983; -0.564 (Bognor Common Quarry)
TQ 009 214
[27]
GCR[28] Map Citation This site exposes the Hythe Beds, part of the Lower Greensand Group, which dates to the Early Cretaceous between 145 and 100 million years ago. Fuller's earth has been found on the site, which may derive from a volcanic source to the south.[29]
Bognor Reef Bognor Reef Green tickY Green tickY 39.7 hectares
(98 acres)
[30]
YES Bognor Regis
50°46′30″N 0°42′22″W / 50.775°N 0.706°W / 50.775; -0.706 (Bognor Reef)
SZ 913 981
[30]
GCR[31][32][33] Map Citation This is an area of beach, sand dunes, grassland, scrub and marsh. Flora include the nationally endangered childing pink. It is one of the few areas which has the full sequence of layers in the London Clay, dating to the Early Eocene around fifty million years ago. It is particularly valuable for plant fossils. It is described by Natural England as the most important site in the world for pyritised fossil insects, especially beetles.[34]
Bracklesham Bay Bracklesham Bay Green tickY Green tickY 200.6 hectares
(496 acres)
[35]
YES Chichester
50°45′11″N 0°50′49″W / 50.753°N 0.847°W / 50.753; -0.847 (Bracklesham Bay)
SZ 814 954
[35]
GCR[36][37] Map Citation This stretch of foreshore has unimproved grazing pastures, shingle, salt marsh, reed beds and ditches. The pasture is subject to seasonal flooding and it is important for its breeding and overwintering birds. The site has highly fossiliferous Eocene (56 to 34 million years ago) beds with fossils of over 160 fish species. There are also much more recent Middle Pleistocene marine deposits dating to around 500,000 years ago which provide a record of changes in sea levels.[38]
Buchan Hill Ponds Buchan Hill Ponds Green tickY 19.5 hectares
(48 acres)
[39]
YES Crawley
51°05′38″N 0°13′34″W / 51.094°N 0.226°W / 51.094; -0.226 (Buchan Hill Ponds)
TQ 243 342
[39]
Map Citation This site consists of two ponds and adjacent wet woodland. The ponds, which were formed by damming streams, have seventeen species of dragonfly, two of which are nationally uncommon, the hairy dragonfly and downy emerald. The woods have a rich ground flora, including marsh violet, opposite leaved golden saxifrage and wood avens.[40]
Burton Park Burton Park Green tickY 57.7 hectares
(143 acres)
[41]
YES Petworth
50°57′00″N 0°36′40″W / 50.950°N 0.611°W / 50.950; -0.611 (Burton Park)
SU 977 176
[41]
LNR[42] SWT[43] Map Citation This site comprises a large pond, carr woodland, bog, wet heath and marshy grassland. There is a diverse range of invertebrates including three nationally rare species, the snail Omphiscola glabra and the craneflies Erioptera meijerei and Tipula marginata. The site is also important for its breeding water birds, such as water rails and great crested grebes.[44]
Chanctonbury Hill Chanctonbury Hill Green tickY 82.7 hectares
(204 acres)
[45]
PP Steyning
50°53′42″N 0°22′48″W / 50.895°N 0.380°W / 50.895; -0.380 (Chanctonbury Hill)
TQ 140 119
[45]
SM[46] Map Citation This site on the steep slope of the South Downs is mainly woodland with some areas of chalk grassland. A dewpond has great crested newts, a species protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. More than sixty species of breeding birds have been recorded, including meadow pipits, corn buntings and green woodpeckers.[47]
Chantry Mill Chantry Mill Green tickY 8.7 hectares
(21 acres)
[48]
FP Pulborough
50°54′47″N 0°26′42″W / 50.913°N 0.445°W / 50.913; -0.445 (Chantry Mill)
TQ 094 138
[48]
GCR[49] Map Citation This site provides the best exposure of the junction between the Gault and Folkestone Beds of the Wealden Group, dating to around 140 million years ago in the Early Cretaceous.[50]
Chapel Common Chapel Common Green tickY 101.0 hectares
(250 acres)
[51]
YES Liphook
51°03′00″N 0°49′59″W / 51.050°N 0.833°W / 51.050; -0.833 (Chapel Common)
SU 819 285
[51]
SM[52] Map Citation Most of the common is dry heath but there are also areas of woodland, grassland and scrub. Heathland birds include three internationally important species listed on Annex I of the EU Birds Directive: woodlark, nightjar and Dartford warbler. The site also has nationally rare and scarce invertebrates.[53]
Chichester Harbour Chichester Harbour Green tickY Green tickY 3,733.5 hectares
(9,226 acres)
[54]
PP Chichester
50°48′32″N 0°54′58″W / 50.809°N 0.916°W / 50.809; -0.916 (Chichester Harbour)
SU 765 016
[54]
GCR[55] LNR[56][57] NCR[58] Ramsar[59] SAC[60] SPA[61] Map[d] Citation The harbour has diverse habitats, including intertidal mudflats, shingle, saltmarsh, sand dunes, marshes and woodland. The mudflats provide feeding grounds for internationally important numbers of ringed plovers, grey plovers, redshanks, black-tailed godwits, dunlins, sanderlings, curlews and greenshanks. There are geologically important sand dunes and shingles at East Head and east of Langstone.[62]
Chiddingfold Forest Chiddingfold Forest Green tickY 542.5 hectares
(1,341 acres)
[63]
PP Billingshurst
51°05′20″N 0°34′52″W / 51.089°N 0.581°W / 51.089; -0.581 (Chiddingfold Forest)
SU 995 332
[63]
SYWT[64] Map[e] Citation The site consists of a number of separate areas with a mosaic of habitats, such as ancient woodland and conifer plantations. Over 500 species of butterflies and moths have been recorded, including several which are rare and endangered, such as the large tortoiseshell butterfly and the rest harrow and orange upperwing moths. Other insects include the Cheilosia carbonaria hoverfly.[65]
Cissbury Ring Cissbury Ring Green tickY 84.2 hectares
(208 acres)
[66]
YES Worthing
50°51′29″N 0°22′30″W / 50.858°N 0.375°W / 50.858; -0.375 (Cissbury Ring)
TQ 145 078
[66]
SM[67] Map Citation This is the site of a Neolithic flint mine and a large hillfort dating to the Iron Age.[67] It has unimproved chalk grassland, scrub and neutral grassland. Upright brome is dominant in the chalk grassland, while common grasses in the neutral grassland include Yorkshire fog, sheep's fescue and creeping bent. The scrub areas provide important habitats for birds and butterflies.[68]
Clayton to Offham Escarpment Clayton to Offham Escarpment Green tickY 422.5 hectares
(1,044 acres)
[69]
PP Lewes
50°53′49″N 0°04′30″W / 50.897°N 0.075°W / 50.897; -0.075 (Clayton to Offham Escarpment)
TQ 355 126
[69]
SWT[70] Map[f] Citation Much of this site is steeply sloping chalk grassland, which has many flowering plants such as glaucous sedge, autumn gentian, marjoram, squinancywort and several species of orchid. There are also areas of woodland and scrub and the site has a rich community of breeding birds.[71]
Climping Beach Climping Beach Green tickY 32.1 hectares
(79 acres)
[72]
YES Bognor Regis
50°46′48″N 0°33′11″W / 50.780°N 0.553°W / 50.780; -0.553 (Climping Beach)
TQ 021 010
[72]
LNR[73] Map Citation This stretch of shoreline has sand dunes at the back of a vegetated shingle beach, which is a nationally uncommon habitat. The intertidal zone has soft muds and sands with many invertebrates, which are an important source of food for wintering birds, especially sanderling.[74]
Coates Castle Coates Castle Green tickY 7.7 hectares
(19 acres)
[75]
NO Pulborough
50°57′50″N 0°35′28″W / 50.964°N 0.591°W / 50.964; -0.591 (Coates Castle)
SU 991 172
[75]
Map Citation This site consists of three separate areas near Coates Castle. They contain the entire known population (approximately 200) in Britain of Gryllus campestris, a field cricket which is protected under the Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.[76]
Coneyhurst Cutting Coneyhurst Cutting Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[77]
YES Billingshurst
51°00′32″N 0°25′59″W / 51.009°N 0.433°W / 51.009; -0.433 (Coneyhurst Cutting)
TQ 100 244
[77]
GCR[78] Map Citation This road cutting exposes a 0.43-metre (0.47-yard) thick layer of limestone dating to the Lower Weald Clay of the Early Cretaceous around 130 million years ago. The layer contains the fossils of large Viviparus (freshwater river snails) preserved in three dimensions.[79]
Coppedhall Hanger Coppedhall Hanger Green tickY 0.6 hectares
(1.5 acres)
[80]
YES Billingshurst
51°02′17″N 0°27′50″W / 51.038°N 0.464°W / 51.038; -0.464 (Coppedhall Hanger)
TQ 078 276
[80]
GCR[81] Map Citation A stream runs through this site and it exposes a layer of sand, silt and jet from the Lower Weald Clay around 130 million years ago. The sand contains fragments of detritus dating to the 280 million year old Cornubian batholith.[82]
Cow Wood and Harry's Wood Cow Wood and Harry's Wood Green tickY 75.5 hectares
(187 acres)
[83]
YES Haywards Heath
51°03′14″N 0°11′20″W / 51.054°N 0.189°W / 51.054; -0.189 (Cow Wood and Harry's Wood)
TQ 270 298
[83]
Map Citation This area of ancient semi-natural woodland is crossed by ghylls, streams in steep valleys which have a warm and moist microclimate. Forty-seven species of breeding birds have been recorded, including wood warbler, willow tit, hawfinch and lesser spotted woodpecker.[84]
Duncton to Bignor Escarpment Duncton to Bignor Escarpment Green tickY 229.0 hectares
(566 acres)
[85]
PP Pulborough
50°55′12″N 0°37′12″W / 50.920°N 0.620°W / 50.920; -0.620 (Duncton to Bignor Escarpment)
SU 971 143
[85]
NCR[86] SAC[87] Map Citation This steeply sloping site on the South Downs has mature beech woodland together with other habitats including chalk grassland and scrub. Invertebrates include the largest British population of the snail Helicodonta obvoluta and several rare moth species. A spring has a rich marginal vegetation including opposite-leaved golden saxifrage.[88]
Eartham Pit, Boxgrove Eartham Pit, Boxgrove Green tickY 9.8 hectares
(24 acres)
[89]
YES Chichester
50°52′12″N 0°41′24″W / 50.870°N 0.690°W / 50.870; -0.690 (Eartham Pit)
SU 923 086
[89]
GCR[90] Map Citation The oldest human remains in Britain have been discovered on the site, a shinbone and two teeth of Homo heidelbergensis dating to 500,000 years ago. Flint tools have also been found.[91] The site is close to a fossil shoreline which has interglacial mammal fauna in intertidal sediments.[92]
East Dean Park Wood East Dean Park Wood Green tickY 17.8 hectares
(44 acres)
[93]
NO Chichester
50°53′56″N 0°43′19″W / 50.899°N 0.722°W / 50.899; -0.722 (East Dean Park Wood)
SU 900 118
[93]
Map Citation Dry sheltered woods on chalk downland were once common in the county, but this site is one of the few surviving examples. More than 100 species of woodland plant have been recorded, such as spurge laurel and early-purple orchid. There is a nationally important epiphytic flora, including over 80 lichens and 44 mosses and liverworts.[94]
Ebernoe Common Ebernoe Common Green tickY 233.9 hectares
(578 acres)
[95]
PP Petworth
51°02′06″N 0°36′40″W / 51.035°N 0.611°W / 51.035; -0.611 (Ebernoe Common)
SU 975 271
[95]
NCR[96] NNR[97] SAC[98] SWT[99] Map Citation This site consists of several blocks of ancient woodland. It is nationally important for lichens, with over 100 species, and for fungi, with seven Red Data Book species. It is also nationally important for woodland breeding birds and for bats, especially barbastelles and Bechstein’s.[100]
Fairmile Bottom Fairmile Bottom Green tickY 70.2 hectares
(173 acres)
[101]
PP Arundel
50°52′37″N 0°35′38″W / 50.877°N 0.594°W / 50.877; -0.594 (Fairmile Bottom)
SU 990 095
[101]
LNR[102] Map Citation This is an area of scrub, mature forest and species-rich chalk grassland. Yew is dominant over much of the woodland, but in some parts there is a high proportion of beech. According to Natural England there is an "outstanding diversity of beetles" and butterflies include the white admiral and the uncommon silver-washed fritillary.[103]
Felpham Felpham Green tickY 1.0 hectare
(2.5 acres)
[104]
YES Bognor Regis
50°47′06″N 0°39′18″W / 50.785°N 0.655°W / 50.785; -0.655 (Felpham)
SZ 949 992
[104]
GCR[105] Map Citation This short stretch of shoreline is one of only three in Britain to have fossils of flora dating to the Paleocene, the first epoch after the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago. It has yielded four previously unknown genera and sixteen new species.[106]
Forest Mere Forest Mere Green tickY 14.6 hectares
(36 acres)
[107]
FP Liphook
51°03′43″N 0°49′59″W / 51.062°N 0.833°W / 51.062; -0.833 (Forest Mere)
SU 819 298
[107]
Map Citation The site consists of Folly Pond and surrounding woodland, heath and bog. Natural England describes it as notable for its outstanding assemblage of dragonflies, with 17 species recorded, and 49 breeding birds, including heath and woodland species such as stonechat, wood warbler and tree pipit.[108]
Freshfield Lane Freshfield Lane Green tickY 17.0 hectares
(42 acres)
[109]
FP Haywards Heath
51°01′16″N 0°01′41″W / 51.021°N 0.028°W / 51.021; -0.028 (Freshfield Lane)
TQ 384 265
[109]
GCR[110] Map Citation This working quarry exposes rocks dating to formations in the Wealden Group of Lower Cretaceous age, around 140 to 113 million years ago. It is described by Natural England as "internationally important for palaeoenvironmental, provenance and palaeogeographical studies".[111]
Fyning Moor Fyning Moor Green tickY 12.8 hectares
(32 acres)
[112]
FP Petersfield
51°00′11″N 0°50′28″W / 51.003°N 0.841°W / 51.003; -0.841 (Fyning Moor)
SU 814 233
[112]
Map Citation This is a base-rich and springline alder wood, which is a nationally uncommon woodland type. Open rides have diverse flora and there are fens on the margins of a river. There are three nationally uncommon fly species, Xylota abiens, Ctenophora bimaculata and Rhobdomastix hilaris.[113]
Halnaker Chalk Pit Halnaker Chalk Pit Green tickY 6.4 hectares
(16 acres)
[114]
NO Chichester
50°52′19″N 0°41′31″W / 50.872°N 0.692°W / 50.872; -0.692 (Halnaker Chalk Pit)
SU 921 089
[114]
Map Citation This chalk pit is important as it has about 50% of the British population of a nationally rare and vulnerable plant, broad-leaved cudweed. Other plants include hoary plantain, scarlet pimpernel, bent grass, yellow-wort and autumn gentian.[115]
Harting Downs Harting Downs Green tickY 336.3 hectares
(831 acres)
[116]
YES Chichester
50°57′18″N 0°51′43″W / 50.955°N 0.862°W / 50.955; -0.862 (Harting Downs)
SU 800 179
[116]
NCR[117] LNR[118] Map Citation This site consists of several chalk grassland valleys on the steep slope of the South Downs, together with areas of scrub and long-established woodland. The site is important for insects, with a nationally rare snail, Helicondonta obvoluta, two uncommon moths, the wood tiger and the maple prominent, and many rove beetles.[119]
Heyshott Down Heyshott Down Green tickY 42.6 hectares
(105 acres)
[120]
YES Midhurst
50°56′38″N 0°43′30″W / 50.944°N 0.725°W / 50.944; -0.725 (Heyshott Down)
SU 897 168
[120]
NCR[25] Map Citation This site on the South Downs is unimproved chalk grassland, which is a nationally rare habitat. The grassland is plant-rich and it is nationally important for mosses and liverworts, such as Antitrichia curtipendula, Hylocomium brevirostre and Rhytidiadelphus loreus. The site is also nationally important for spiders and harvestmen and it is one of only two sites in Britain where the spider Tapinocyboides pygmaea has been recorded.[121]
Horton Clay Pit Horton Clay Pit Green tickY 0.4 hectares
(0.99 acres)
[122]
NO Henfield
50°53′56″N 0°16′41″W / 50.899°N 0.278°W / 50.899; -0.278 (Horton Clay Pit)
TQ 212 125
[122]
GCR[123] Map Citation This site displays a thick and stratigraphically important sequence of rocks dating to the Folkestone Beds of the Early Cretaceous. It shows evidence of a major structural basin which controlled sedimentation in the western Weald.[124]
House Copse House Copse Green tickY 12.5 hectares
(31 acres)
[125]
NO Horsham
51°06′25″N 0°14′56″W / 51.107°N 0.249°W / 51.107; -0.249 (House Copse)
TQ 227 357
[125]
Map Citation This ancient wood was formerly managed as hornbeam and small-leaved lime coppice with oak standards. There is limited ground flora in densely shaded areas, but the banks of a stream have more diverse flora, including dog’s mercury, wood avens, bugle and enchanter’s nightshade.[126]
Hurston Warren Hurston Warren Green tickY 69.1 hectares
(171 acres)
[127]
PP Pulborough
50°56′35″N 0°28′37″W / 50.943°N 0.477°W / 50.943; -0.477 (Hurston Warren)
TQ 071 170
[127]
Map Citation This site has a variety of habitats, including wet and dry heath, bogs, woodland and open water. One of the bogs is a quaking bog, where a floating raft of vegetation covers open water or fluid peat; it has flora such as round-leaved sundew, bog asphodel, hare's-tail cottongrass and cranberry. A golf course occupies much of the heath.[128]
Iping Common Iping Common Green tickY 125.4 hectares
(310 acres)
[129]
YES Midhurst
50°59′24″N 0°47′31″W / 50.990°N 0.792°W / 50.990; -0.792 (Iping Common)
SU 849 219
[129]
LNR[130] NCR[16] SWT[131] Map Citation This is described by Natural England as one of the richest areas of heath in the county. Most of it is dry but there are also areas of wet heath, two ponds, woodland, scrub and grassland. It has a rich invertebrate fauna and breeding heathland birds include nightjars and stonechats.[132]
Kingley Vale Kingley Vale Green tickY 204.4 hectares
(505 acres)
[133]
PP Chichester
50°53′38″N 0°49′59″W / 50.894°N 0.833°W / 50.894; -0.833 (Kingley Vale)
SU 822 112
[133]
NCR[134] NNR[135] SAC[136] SM[137] Map Citation This reserve's yew woods are described by Natural England as the best in Britain as it has the most extensive stands unmixed with other species. One grove is thought to be over 500 years old, but most trees are less than 200 years old. There are also areas of chalk grassland which are rich in flowering plants and 37 breeding species of butterfly have been recorded.[138]
Lavington Common Lavington Common Green tickY 31.2 hectares
(77 acres)
[139]
YES Petworth
50°57′40″N 0°39′00″W / 50.961°N 0.650°W / 50.961; -0.650 (Lavington Common)
SU 949 188
[139]
Map Citation This site has wet and dry heath, acid grassland and woodland. It has a rich community of invertebrates, especially spiders. Common trees in the woods are silver birch, downy birch and oak, while the shrub layer is dominated by bracken and bramble.[140]
Levin Down Levin Down Green tickY 25.6 hectares
(63 acres)
[141]
YES Chichester
50°54′54″N 0°44′28″W / 50.915°N 0.741°W / 50.915; -0.741 (Levin Down)
SU 886 136
[141]
SWT[142] Map Citation This is an area of chalk grassland and heath on the slope of the South Downs. The chalk turf has a rich variety of flora, such as autumn gentian, salad burnet, round-headed rampion, autumn lady’s tresses, eyebright, glaucous sedge and quaking grass.[143]
Marehill Quarry Marehill Quarry Green tickY 1.1 hectares
(2.7 acres)
[144]
NO Pulborough
50°57′25″N 0°29′10″W / 50.957°N 0.486°W / 50.957; -0.486 (Marehill Quarry)
TQ 064 186
[144]
GCR[145] SWT[146] Map Citation This disused quarry is the type locality for the Marehill Clay, a member of the Sandgate Beds, part of the Lower Greensand Group, which dates to the Lower Cretaceous between 145 and 100 million years ago.[147] It has caves which are used for hibernation by several species of bats, including Natterer's, whiskered and Daubenton's.[146]
The Mens The Mens Green tickY 205.2 hectares
(507 acres)
[148]
PP Billingshurst
51°00′11″N 0°32′31″W / 51.003°N 0.542°W / 51.003; -0.542 (The Men)
TQ 024 236
[148]
NCR[149] SAC[150] SWT[151] Map Citation This large area of woodland has diverse breeding birds and rich lichen and fungal floras. There are many rare beetles and an endangered fly, Chelostoma curvinervis. All three British species of woodpecker breed on the site, together with other woodland species such as nightingales, woodcocks and wood warblers.[152]
Mills Rocks Mills Rocks Green tickY 1.9 hectares
(4.7 acres)
[153]
FP East Grinstead
51°06′54″N 0°07′05″E / 51.115°N 0.118°E / 51.115; 0.118 (Mills Rocks)
TQ 414 370
[153]
Map Citation This site has rock outcrops with a number of rare plants, such as reed fescue grass at one of its only two locations in southern England. The rocks also support a rich variety of mosses and liverworts. There are also areas of woodland, bracken and bramble.[154]
Northpark Copse to Snapelands Copse Northpark Copse to Snapelands Copse Green tickY 101.4 hectares
(251 acres)
[155]
PP Haslemere
51°01′08″N 0°42′40″W / 51.019°N 0.711°W / 51.019; -0.711 (Northpark Copse to Snapelands Copse)
SU 905 252
[155]
Map Citation This site is important mainly because of its mosses and liverworts, which are relics of a period 5000 years ago when the British climate was milder and wetter. There are old stools of Chestnut coppice which have six species of the moss genus Dicranum and liverworts include Bazzania trilobata, Marsupella emarginata and Kurzia sylvatica.[156]
Pads Wood Pads Wood Green tickY 22.2 hectares
(55 acres)
[157]
NO Chichester
50°56′28″N 0°52′52″W / 50.941°N 0.881°W / 50.941; -0.881 (Pads Wood)
SU 787 163
[157]
Map Citation This ancient coppiced wood is mainly hazel and sweet chestnut, with pedunculate oak and ash standards. The site has a rich lichen flora, most of which are epiphytic on the oak and ash standards, and a wide woodland path has a rich display of flowering plants.[158]
Pagham Harbour Pagham Harbour Green tickY Green tickY 629.0 hectares
(1,554 acres)
[159]
PP Bognor Regis
50°45′50″N 0°45′54″W / 50.764°N 0.765°W / 50.764; -0.765 (Pagham Harbour)
SZ 872 968
[159]
GCR[160] LNR[161] NCR[159] Ramsar[162] SPA[163] Map Citation This is a large area of salt marsh, mud flats, shingle, open water, reed swamp and wet grassland. It is of national importance for breeding birds and wintering wildfowl and waders. It also has nationally important communities of plants and invertebrates, including the nationally endangered sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.[164]
Parham Park Parham Park Green tickY 263.3 hectares
(651 acres)
[165]
PL Pulborough
50°55′23″N 0°29′35″W / 50.923°N 0.493°W / 50.923; -0.493 (Parham Park)
TQ 060 148
[165]
NCR[166] Map Citation This medieval deer park has a very rich epiphytic lichen flora, with 165 recorded species. Habitats include woods, parkland, bogs and artificial ponds. The site also has a large heronry and two rare beetles, Ampedus cardinalis and Procraerus tibialis.[167]
Park Farm Cutting Park Farm Cutting Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[168]
YES Pulborough
50°57′36″N 0°31′19″W / 50.960°N 0.522°W / 50.960; -0.522 (Park Farm Cutting)
TQ 039 189
[168]
GCR[169] Map Citation This site exposes the Sandgate Beds of the Lower Greensand Group, which dates to the Early Cretaceous between 145 and 100 million years ago. It is the best collecting ground for a diverse range of mollusc fossils.[170]
Perry Copse Outcrop Perry Copse Outcrop Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[171]
NO Haslemere
51°03′04″N 0°43′48″W / 51.051°N 0.730°W / 51.051; -0.730 (Perry Copse Outcrop)
SU 891 287
[171]
GCR[172] Map Citation This site dates to the Early Cretaceous, between 145 and 100 million years ago. The steep banks of a stream expose a 5-metre (16-foot) high section of the Netherside Sand Member, part of the Weald Clay Group. There are 1 metre (1 yard) high fossils of Lycopodites in upright position.[173]
Philpot's and Hook Quarries Philpot's Quarry Green tickY 2.6 hectares
(6.4 acres)
[174]
NO East Grinstead
51°04′12″N 0°04′05″W / 51.070°N 0.068°W / 51.070; -0.068 (Philpot's and Hook Quarries)
TQ 355 319
[174]
GCR[175][176] Map Citation These quarries expose the Ardingly Sandstone Member in the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation, which is part of the Wealden Group, dating to the Lower Cretaceous between 145 and 100 million years ago. Philpot's Quarry has many dinosaur fossils and both quarries have debris dating to the Precambrian.[177]
Pulborough Brooks Pulborough Brooks Green tickY 160.0 hectares
(395 acres)
[178]
YES Pulborough
50°56′35″N 0°30′11″W / 50.943°N 0.503°W / 50.943; -0.503 (Pulborough Brooks)
TQ 053 170
[178]
Ramsar[10] SAC[11] SPA[12] Map Citation These wet meadows are crossed by a network of ditches, some of which have a rich aquatic flora and invertebrate fauna, including several which are nationally rare. The site is internationally important for wintering wildfowl and many species of birds breed there, such as lapwing, snipe, garganey, yellow wagtail, grey partridge, skylark, reed bunting and barn owl.[179]
Rake Hanger Rake Hanger Green tickY 28.2 hectares
(70 acres)
[180]
FP Liss
51°01′59″N 0°52′05″W / 51.033°N 0.868°W / 51.033; -0.868 (Rake Hanger)
SU 795 266
[180]
Map Citation Sessile oak is dominant on the steep slope of this site, while alder is the most common tree at the waterlogged foot of the scarp. There are lichens associated with ancient woodland, such as Thelotrema lepadinum and Haematomma elatinum. Great tussock sedge, bur-reed and great reedmace grow on the banks of two ponds.[181]
Rook Clift Rook Clift Green tickY 10.7 hectares
(26 acres)
[182]
YES Midhurst
50°57′25″N 0°50′06″W / 50.957°N 0.835°W / 50.957; -0.835 (Rook Clift)
SU 819 182
[182]
SAC[183] Map Citation A stream rises in this steep-sided valley, which has semi-natural ancient woodland on its slopes. The canopy is dominated by a nationally scarce tree, large leaved lime, with other trees including beech and ash. The rich mollusc fauna includes Helicodonta obvoluta, which is a Red Data Book species.[184]
Selsey, East Beach Selsey, East Beach Green tickY 1.7 hectares
(4.2 acres)
[185]
YES Chichester
50°43′34″N 0°46′59″W / 50.726°N 0.783°W / 50.726; -0.783 (Selsey, East Beach)
SZ 860 925
[185]
GCR[186] Map Citation This site exposes a sequence of marine estuary and freshwater deposits dating to the warm Eemian interglacial. The site has fossils of fauna dating to the early Eemian around 130 thousand years ago, such as straight-tusked elephant, an extinct species of rhinoceros, Dicerorhinus hemitoechus, European pond tortoise, beaver and horse.[187]
Shillinglee Lake Shillinglee Lake Green tickY 17.0 hectares
(42 acres)
[188]
FP Billingshurst
51°04′12″N 0°37′12″W / 51.070°N 0.620°W / 51.070; -0.620 (Shillinglee Lake)
SU 968 310
[188]
Map Citation The lake has been designated an SSSI because it has four nationally uncommon plants: it is one of only ten locations in the country for Leersia oryzoides, a species of cut-grass, and the other three are water mudwort, needle spikerush and six-stamen waterwort, all of which are found on mud when the water level is low.[189]
Singleton and Cocking Tunnels Singleton and Cocking Tunnels Green tickY 1.9 hectares
(4.7 acres)
[190]
NO Chichester
50°55′48″N 0°45′40″W / 50.930°N 0.761°W / 50.930; -0.761 (Singleton and Cocking Tunnels)
SU 872 152
[190]
SAC[191] Map Citation These disused railway tunnels are the fifth most important site for hibernating bats in Britain and the most important in south-east England. They are the only known location in the country for the greater mouse-eared bat. Other species include Natterer's, Daubenton's, Brandt's and brown long-eared bats.[192]
Slinfold Stream and Quarry Slinfold Stream Green tickY 2.3 hectares
(5.7 acres)
[193]
PP Horsham
51°04′23″N 0°23′46″W / 51.073°N 0.396°W / 51.073; -0.396 (Slinfold Stream and Quarry)
TQ 125 316
[193]
GCR[194] Map Citation This site exposes the Horsham Stone member of the Lower Weald Clay, dating to the Early Cretaceous, around 130 million years ago. It preserves the fossils of horsetails in their upright position, suggesting that they grew in a fresh water reedswamp with a maximum depth of 2 metres (2.2 yards).[195]
St Leonard's Forest St Leonard's Forest Green tickY 85.4 hectares
(211 acres)
[196]
PP Horsham
51°03′25″N 0°16′19″W / 51.057°N 0.272°W / 51.057; -0.272 (St Leonard's Forest)
TQ 212 301
[196]
Map Citation Much of the forest is deciduous woodland, which is dominated by pedunculate oak, silver birch, common birch and beech. The humid microclimate of a narrow valley has allowed mosses and liverworts to survive which indicate continuous woodland cover for the past 5,000 years. Butterflies include the rare purple emperor.[197]
St Leonard's Park Ponds St Leonard's Park Ponds Green tickY 3.9 hectares
(9.6 acres)
[198]
YES Horsham
51°03′47″N 0°17′24″W / 51.063°N 0.290°W / 51.063; -0.290 (St Leonard's Park Ponds)
TQ 199 306
[198]
Map Citation These ponds and adjacent woodland provide habitats for a wide variety of dragonflies and damselflies, including some uncommon species such as the variable damselfly The banks have rich flora including the nationally rare yellow centaury. There are also several unusual mosses and liverworts.[199]
Stone Hill Rocks Stone Hill Rocks Green tickY 0.6 hectares
(1.5 acres)
[200]
YES East Grinstead
51°05′42″N 0°01′52″W / 51.095°N 0.031°W / 51.095; -0.031 (Stone Hill Rocks)
TQ 380 347
[200]
GCR[201] Map Citation This is typical of many sandstone crags in mid-Sussex which expose the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation, part of the Wealden Group which dates to the Early Cretaceous between 145 and 100 million years ago. It displays a variety of sedimentary structures in three dimensions and is described by Natural England as "an important site for the study and interpretation of sedimentary structures in the upper Lower Tunbridge Wells Sand".[202]
Sullington Warren Sullington Warren Green tickY 24.7 hectares
(61 acres)
[203]
YES Pulborough
50°55′08″N 0°26′28″W / 50.919°N 0.441°W / 50.919; -0.441 (Sullington Warren)
TQ 097 144
[203]
SM[204][205] Map Citation Most of this site is dry heath, but there are also areas of wet heath, scrub, bracken, woodland and grassland. Flora on the wet heath includes hare's-tail cottongrass and the insectivorous round-leaved sundew. Woodland birds include all three British species of woodpecker, tree-creepers, long-tailed tits, nuthatches, nightingales and kestrels.[206]
Treyford to Bepton Down Treyford to Bepton Down Green tickY 121.5 hectares
(300 acres)
[207]
PP Midhurst
50°57′04″N 0°48′00″W / 50.951°N 0.800°W / 50.951; -0.800 (Treyford to Bepton Down)
SU 844 175
[207]
Map Citation This site consists of five separate blocks of steeply sloping chalk grassland and yew woodland on the South Downs. The grassland has a rich variety of species, including herbs such as round-headed rampion, horseshoe vetch and carline thistle, while there are orchids such as frog, bee and musk. The uncommon moss Rhacomitrium lanuginosum has also been recorded.[208]
Turners Hill Turners Hill Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[209]
NO Crawley
51°06′07″N 0°05′24″W / 51.102°N 0.090°W / 51.102; -0.090 (Turners Hill)
TQ 338 354
[209]
GCR[210] Map Citation This former quarry (which is now filled in) exposed the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation, part of the Hastings Beds, which dates to the Early Cretaceous between about 145 and 100 million years ago. It provided excellent three dimensional sections through the Ardingly Sandstone Member of the Formation.[211]
Upper Arun Upper Arun Green tickY 17.6 hectares
(43 acres)
[212]
Pulborough
50°59′17″N 0°30′50″W / 50.988°N 0.514°W / 50.988; -0.514 (Upper Arun)
TQ 044 220
[212]
Map Citation This 13-kilometre (8-mile) long stretch of the River Arun provides the habitat for a rich riverine flora, such as common club-rush and reed canary-grass. It is an outstanding site for breeding dragonflies, including the clubtail, hairy, brilliant emerald and the nationally rare scarce chaser.[213]
Wakehurst and Chiddingly Woods Wakehurst and Chiddingly Woods Green tickY Green tickY 155.9 hectares
(385 acres)
[214]
PP Haywards Heath
51°04′23″N 0°05′38″W / 51.073°N 0.094°W / 51.073; -0.094 (Wakehurst and Chiddingly Woods)
TQ 336 321
[214]
GCR[215] NCR[96] Map Citation These woods have steep-sided valleys formed by streams cutting through Wadhurst Clay and Tunbridge Wells sands, exposing outcrops of sandstone. The valleys have a warm, moist micro-climate, with a rich variety of ferns, mosses, liverworts and lichens. There is also a diverse breeding bird community. Chiddingly Wood is geologically important because weathering of its sandstone has produced sculptured blocks and a comprehensive set of micro-weathering features.[216]
Waltham Brooks Waltham Brooks Green tickY 47.4 hectares
(117 acres)
[217]
FP Pulborough
50°55′55″N 0°32′35″W / 50.932°N 0.543°W / 50.932; -0.543 (Waltham Brooks)
TQ 025 157
[217]
Ramsar[10] SPA[12] SWT[218] Map Citation This is one of the few remaining areas of grazing marsh in the county and it has a rich variety of aquatic flora, including one nationally rare species, the small water-pepper. Many bird species winter at the site, including three in nationally important numbers, Bewick’s swan, teal and shoveler.[219]
Warnham Warnham Green tickY 28.5 hectares
(70 acres)
[220]
NO Horsham
51°06′14″N 0°19′08″W / 51.104°N 0.319°W / 51.104; -0.319 (Warnham)
TQ 178 352
[220]
GCR[221] Map Citation This site exposes rocks of the Weald Clay Group, dating to the Lower Cretaceous around 130 million years ago. It preserves fossil plants from freshwater and brackish-marine environments.[222]
West Dean Woods West Dean Woods Green tickY 16.3 hectares
(40 acres)
[223]
NO Chichester
50°55′59″N 0°47′49″W / 50.933°N 0.797°W / 50.933; -0.797 (West Dean Woods)
SU 846 155
[223]
SWT[224] Map Citation These woods have records dating back to the sixteenth century. The ground layer is rich in flowering plants, including white helleborine, fly orchid and around two million wild daffodils. Thirty five bryophytes have been recorded and invertebrates include two rare hoverflies which live on dead wood, Cheilosa carbonaria and Cheilosa nigripes.[225][224]
West Harting Down West Harting Down Green tickY 13.9 hectares
(34 acres)
[226]
YES Petersfield
50°57′22″N 0°55′05″W / 50.956°N 0.918°W / 50.956; -0.918 (West Harting Down)
SU 761 179
[226]
Map Citation This is mainly mature yew forest on the chalk of the South Downs. There are also areas of chalk grassland with flora such as rock rose, carnation sedge, perforate St John’s wort and salad burnet, with grasses such as red fescue, tor-grass and common bent.[227]
West Hoathly West Hoathly Green tickY 0.7 hectares
(1.7 acres)
[228]
NO East Grinstead
51°04′37″N 0°02′24″W / 51.077°N 0.040°W / 51.077; -0.040 (West Hoathly)
TQ 374 326
[228]
GCR[229] Map Citation This working quarry exposes clays of the Wadhurst Clay Formation, which is part of the Wealden Group, dating to the Early Cretaceous between 145 and 100 million years ago. The site lies close to a postulated gap in the London-Brabant Massif through which the Boreal Sea is thought to have periodically flowed, and it is described by Natural England as "important for interpreting environmental conditions at the northwestern extremity of the Wadhurst Clay outcrop".[230]
Wolstonbury Hill Wolstonbury Hill Green tickY 58.9 hectares
(146 acres)
[231]
YES Brighton
50°54′32″N 0°10′30″W / 50.909°N 0.175°W / 50.909; -0.175 (Wolstonbury Hill)
TQ 284 138
[231]
SM[232] Map Citation This steeply sloping site is mainly grassland with areas of beach and oak woodland. The chalk grassland is species-rich, including rare plants such as round-headed rampion. It is the only known location in the county for Dyer’s greenweed and there are bee, fly, pyramidal and early purple orchids.[233]
Woolbeding and Pound Commons Woolbeding and Pound Commons Green tickY 171.9 hectares
(425 acres)
[234]
YES Midhurst
51°01′19″N 0°57′50″W / 51.022°N 0.964°W / 51.022; -0.964 (Woolbeding and Pound Commons)
SU 868 255
[234]
Map Citation The commons have areas of wet and dry heath, woodland, ponds and wet flushes. Invertebrates include a number of Red Data Book species, such as the bee Hylaeus gibbus, the Eumenes coarctatus and Psen bruxellensis wasps and the click-beetle Hylis olexai. The site also provides a habitat for three rare birds, woodlark, nightjar and Dartford warbler.[235]
Woolmer Forest Woolmer Forest Green tickY 1,298.5 hectares
(3,209 acres)
[236]
PP Liphook
51°04′44″N 0°51′25″W / 51.079°N 0.857°W / 51.079; -0.857 (Woolmer Forest)
SU 802 317
[236]
NCR[237] SAC[238] SPA[239] Map[d] Citation The forest has a nationally important heathland flora, with rare plants such as tower mustard, mossy stonecrop, shepherd’s cress and smooth cat’s-ear. The invertebrate fauna is very rich. There are extensive areas of open water and it is the only site in the country known to have all twelve native species of reptiles and amphibians.[240]
Worth Forest Worth Forest Green tickY 43.8 hectares
(108 acres)
[241]
FP Crawley
51°04′59″N 0°09′14″W / 51.083°N 0.154°W / 51.083; -0.154 (Worth Forest)
TQ 294 331
[241]
Map Citation This ancient wood is in a ghyll formed by a stream which has eroded soft sandstone. The poorly drained valley bottom has carpets of Sphagnum while the upper slopes are dry and have a diverse community of mosses, liverworts and lichens.[242]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The area and grid reference are taken from the "Details" page for each site on the Natural England database.[4]
  2. ^ The maps are provided by Natural England on the Magic Map website.
  3. ^ Citations are provided for each site by Natural England.
  4. ^ a b This site is partly in Hampshire.
  5. ^ This site is partly in Surrey.
  6. ^ This site is partly in East Sussex.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "West Sussex Quick Facts". West Sussex.info. Archived from the original on 25 October 2018. Retrieved 17 July 2019.
  2. ^ "West Sussex". Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. Archived from the original on 2 April 2019. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Sites of Special Scientific Interest: Designation". Natural England. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 19 April 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: West Sussex". Natural England. Retrieved 14 July 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Adur Estuary". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  6. ^ "Adur Estuary citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 12 April 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Amberley Mount to Sullington Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  8. ^ "Amberley Mount to Sullington Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 13 April 2019.
  9. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: Amberley Wild Brooks". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  10. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: Arun Valley". Ramsar Site. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Arun Valley". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  12. ^ a b c "Designated Sites View: Arun Valley". Special Protection Areas. Natural England. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  13. ^ "Amberley Wildbrooks". Sussex Wildlife Trust. Archived from the original on 21 December 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  14. ^ "Amberley Wild Brooks citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 28 February 2019. Retrieved 13 April 2019.
  15. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Ambersham Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  16. ^ a b Ratcliffe, p. 119
  17. ^ "Ambersham Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  18. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Arun Banks". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  19. ^ "Arun Banks citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  20. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Arundel Park". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  21. ^ "Arundel Park citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  22. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Beeding Hill to Newtimber Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  23. ^ "Devil's Dyke (Quaternary of South-East England)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  24. ^ "Devil's Dyke (Karst)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  25. ^ a b Ratcliffe, p. 120
  26. ^ "Beeding Hill to Newtimber Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  27. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bognor Common Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  28. ^ "Bognor Common Quarry (Aptian-Albian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  29. ^ "Bognor Common Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  30. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bognor Reef". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  31. ^ "Bognor Regis (Mesozoic – Tertiary Fish/Amphibia)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  32. ^ "Bognor Regis (Palaeoentomology)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  33. ^ "Bognor Regis (Aves)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  34. ^ "Bognor Reef citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  35. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Bracklesham Bay". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  36. ^ "Bracklesham (Tertiary Palaeobotany)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  37. ^ "Bracklesham Bay (Mesozoic – Tertiary Fish/Amphibia)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  38. ^ "Bracklesham Bay citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  39. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Buchan Hill Ponds". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  40. ^ "Buchan Hill Ponds citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  41. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Burton Park". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  42. ^ "Designated Sites View: Burton and Chingford Ponds". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  43. ^ "Burton and Chingford Ponds". Sussex Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 8 April 2019.
  44. ^ "Burton Park citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  45. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chanctonbury Hill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  46. ^ Historic England. "Chanctonbury Ring hillfort and Romano-Celtic temples (1015114)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  47. ^ "Chanctonbury Hill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  48. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chantry Mill". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  49. ^ "Chantry Mill (Aptian-Albian)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  50. ^ "Chantry Mill citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  51. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chapel Common". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  52. ^ Historic England. "Roman road at Chapel Common (1015236)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  53. ^ "Chapel Common citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  54. ^ a b "Designated Sites View: Chichester Harbour". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  55. ^ "East Head (Chichester Harbour) (Coastal Geomorphology of England)". Geological Conservation Review. Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 5 September 2012. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  56. ^ "Designated Sites View: Nutborne Marshes". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  57. ^ "Designated Sites View: Pilsey Island". Local Nature Reserves. Natural England. Archived from the original on 27 March 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  58. ^ Ratcliffe, pp. 3–4
  59. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chichester and Langstone Harbours". Ramsar Site. Natural England. Archived from the original on 1 April 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  60. ^ "Designated Sites View: Solent Maritime". Special Areas of Conservation. Natural England. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  61. ^ "Designated Sites View: Chichester and Langstone Harbours". Special Protection Areas. Natural England. Archived from the original on 1 April 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
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Sources[edit]

  • Ratcliffe, Derek, ed. (1977). A Nature Conservation Review. 2. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-21403-2.