List of South American dinosaurs

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This is a list of dinosaurs whose remains have been recovered from South America.

Criteria for inclusion[edit]

List of South American dinosaurs[edit]

Valid genera[edit]

Name Year Formation Location Notes Images
Abelisaurus 1985 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Only known from a single partial skull Abelisaurus comahuensis jmallon.jpg
Achillesaurus 2007 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina Potentially a junior synonym of Alvarezsaurus[1] Achillesaurus.jpg
Adamantisaurus 2006 Adamantina Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Brazil Derived for a titanosaur as indicated by the ball-and-socket articulations of its caudal vertebrae Adamantisaurus by Ademar Pereira.JPG
Adeopapposaurus 2009 Cañón del Colorado Formation (Early Jurassic, Hettangian to Pliensbachian)  Argentina May have had a keratinous beak based on the shape of its jaw bones Adeopapposaurus mognai.jpg
Aeolosaurus 1987 Angostura Colorada Formation, Lago Colhué Huapí Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Known from the remains of several individuals Aeolosaurus-rionegrinus-JD-2020-1.png
Aerosteon 2009 Plottier Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina) Its bones were extensively pneumatized, suggesting an air sac system like those of modern birds Aerosteon BW.jpg
Agustinia 1999 Lohan Cura Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Argentina Originally described as possessing long, vaguely-stegosaur like spikes, although these turned out to be fragments of ribs and other bones[2]
Alnashetri 2012 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina The oldest alvarezsaurid known from South America Alnashetri LM.png
Alvarezsaurus 1991 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina One of the largest known alvarezsaurids Alvarezsaurus calvoi.jpg
Amargasaurus 1991 La Amarga Formation (Early Cretaceous, Barremian to Aptian)  Argentina Possessed two parallel rows of backward-pointing spines on its neck Amargasaurus NT small.jpg
Amargatitanis 2007 La Amarga Formation (Early Cretaceous, Barremian)  Argentina Originally described as a titanosaur[3] although it has since been reinterpreted as a dicraeosaurid[4] Amargatitanis LM.png
Amazonsaurus 2003 Itapecuru Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Brazil Had tall neural spines on its caudal vertebrae
Amygdalodon 1947 Cerro Carnerero Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Its teeth were shaped like almonds Amygdalodon LM.png
Anabisetia 2002 Lisandro Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Four specimens are known but none of them preserve a skull Anabisetia saldiviai copia.jpg
Andesaurus 1991 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Several osteological features indicate a basal position within the Titanosauria Andesaurus LM.png
Aniksosaurus 2006 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Bone bed remains suggest a gregarious lifestyle[5] Aniksosaurus LM.png
Antarctosaurus 1929 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Multiple specimens have been assigned to this genus, including some from outside South America, but most may not represent the same taxon Antarctosaurus dinosaur.jpg
Aoniraptor 2016 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Potentially synonymous with Gualicho
Arackar 2021 Hornitos Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Chile The most complete sauropod known from South America
Aratasaurus 2020 Romualdo Formation (Early Cretaceous, Albian)  Brazil All three of its toes were symmetric Aratasaurus museunacionali.jpg
Argentinosaurus 1993 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina May be the largest known dinosaur Argentinosaurus BW.jpg
Argyrosaurus 1893 Lago Colhué Huapí Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Several remains were historically assigned to this genus, but only the holotype can be confidently assigned to it[6] Argyrosaurus superbus.jpg
Arrudatitan 2021 Adamantina Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Brazil Its tail probably curved strongly downward, with the tip held very low to the ground[7]
Asfaltovenator 2019 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Combines traits of both megalosauroids and allosauroids. Its describers suggest paraphyly of the former group[8] Asfaltovenator vialidadi.png
Atacamatitan 2011 Tolar Formation (Late Cretaceous)  Chile Only known from a single, fragmentary skeleton Atacamatitan LM.png
Aucasaurus 2002 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian to Campanian)  Argentina Known from almost the entire skeleton, including most of the skull Aucasaurus garridoi by Paleocolour.jpg
Austrocheirus 2010 Cerro Fortaleza Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Unusually for an abelisauroid, its arms were relatively long Austrocheirus isasii.png
Austroposeidon 2016 Presidente Prudente Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Brazil The largest dinosaur known from Brazil Autroposeidon LM.jpg
Austroraptor 2008 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Possessed an elongated snout paralleling that of spinosaurids Austroraptor Restoration.png
Baalsaurus 2018 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Turonian to Coniacian)  Argentina Had a squared-off dentary with its teeth crowded to the front
Bagualia 2020 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Represents an early radiation of eusauropods that displaced earlier basal sauropodomorphs after a global warming event[9]
Bagualosaurus 2018 Santa Maria Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Brazil Its hindlimbs were very robust Bagualosaurus NT.jpg
Bajadasaurus 2019 Bajada Colorada Formation (Early Cretaceous, Berriasian to Valanginian)  Argentina Possessed elongated, forward-pointing spines erupting in pairs from the neck Bajadasaurus SW.png
Barrosasaurus 2009 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Only known from three vertebrae but are well-preserved enough to warrant recognition as a distinct genus
Baurutitan 2005 Serra da Galga Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Brazil Described from an associated series of nineteen vertebrae
Berthasaura 2021 Goio-Erê Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Brazil Possessed a short, toothless beak, indicating a herbivorous or omnivorous diet Life reconstruction of Berthasaura leopoldinae gen. et sp. nov. in the paleoenvironment represented by the “Cemitério dos Pterossauros” Quarry..jpg
Bicentenaria 2012 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Several individuals were preserved together, suggesting a gregarious lifestyle[10] Bicentenaria.jpg
Bonapartenykus 2012 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Its holotype was preserved with two eggs that may have been within its oviducts when it died[11] Bonapartenykus.png
Bonapartesaurus 2017 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Represents a saurolophine dispersal event from North America[12]
Bonatitan 2004 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Analysis of its inner ear suggests a decreased range of head movements compared to other sauropods[13]
Bonitasaura 2004 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina The proportions of its body were similar to those of diplodocoids, likely through convergent evolution Bonitasaura head.jpg
Brachytrachelopan 2005 Cañadón Calcáreo Formation (Late Jurassic, Oxfordian to Tithonian)  Argentina Possessed the shortest neck of any known sauropod Brachytrachelopan BW2.jpg
Brasilotitan 2013 Adamantina Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Brazil Had an L-shaped dentary similar to that of Antarctosaurus and Bonitasaura
Bravasaurus 2020 Ciénaga del Río Huaco Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Discovered close to a large concentration of titanosaur eggs
Buitreraptor 2005 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina May have been a pursuit predator due to its long legs[14] Buitreraptor NT.jpg
Buriolestes 2016 Santa Maria Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Brazil Completely carnivorous due to its serrated teeth Buriolestes schultzi restoration.png
Campylodoniscus 1961 Bajo Barreal Formation? (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Only known from a single maxilla with seven teeth
Carnotaurus 1985 La Colonia Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina Possessed a pair of short horns on the top of its skull Carnotaurus 2017.png
Cathartesaura 2005 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Had a well-muscled neck although it could not move strongly up or down
Chilesaurus 2015 Toqui Formation (Late Jurassic, Tithonian)  Chile Combines traits of theropods, sauropodomorphs, and ornithischians, with far-reaching implications for the evolution of the Dinosauria Chilesasaurus.png
Choconsaurus 2017 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina One of the more completely known basal titanosaurs
Chromogisaurus 2010 Ischigualasto Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Argentina Its discovery suggests that early dinosaurs were more diverse than previously thought
Chubutisaurus 1975 Cerro Barcino Formation (Early Cretaceous, Albian)  Argentina Unusually, its forelimbs were shorter than its hindlimbs[15] Chubutisaurus.jpg
Clasmodosaurus 1898 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Similarly to Bonitasaura, its teeth were polygonal in cross-section
Coloradisaurus 1990 Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Argentina Originally called Coloradia, although that genus name is occupied by a moth
Comahuesaurus 2012 Lohan Cura Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Argentina Its holotype was originally assigned to Limaysaurus, but it was named as a separate genus due to possessing a certain feature in its vertebrae
Condorraptor 2005 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Closely related to the coeval Piatnitzkysaurus but could be distinguished by several osteological features Condorraptor.jpg
Dreadnoughtus 2014 Cerro Fortaleza Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina The heaviest land animal whose mass can be calculated with reasonable certainty Dreadnoughtus NT small.jpg
Drusilasaura 2011 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Potentially the oldest known member of the lognkosaurian lineage[16] Drusilasaura.png
Ekrixinatosaurus 2004 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Had robust bones, indicating a massive build and a greater resistance to injuries[17] Ekrixinatosaurus novasi by Henrique Paes.png
Elaltitan 2012 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Extremely large due to its long femur
Eoabelisaurus 2012 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Shows a transitional arm morphology for an abelisauroid, with a shortened lower arm and hand, but an unreduced humerus Eoabelisaurus life restoration.jpg
Eodromaeus 2011 Ischigualasto Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian  Argentina Well-adapted for cursoriality despite its early age[18] Eodromaeus 400 AJV.png
Eoraptor 1993 Ischigualasto Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Argentina Possessed different types of teeth, suggesting it was omnivorous Eoraptor lunensis recon.jpg
Epachthosaurus 1990 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Its caudal vertebrae were procoelous; i.e. concave at the front and convex at the back
Erythrovenator 2021 Candelária Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian to Norian)  Brazil Known from the Riograndia Assemblage Zone, an area which is unusually dominated by cynodonts Erythrovenator jacuiensis.png
Futalognkosaurus 2007 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Possessed meter-deep cervical vertebrae with distinctive shark fin-shaped neural spines Futalognkosaurus BW.jpg
Gasparinisaura 1996 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Known from specimens of both adults and juveniles Gasparinisaura BW.jpg
Genyodectes 1901 Cerro Barcino Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Argentina Had extremely large and protruding teeth Genyodectes restoration.png
Giganotosaurus 1995 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina One of the largest known terrestrial carnivorous dinosaurs Giganotos Db.jpg
Gondwanatitan 1999 Adamantina Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina For a titanosaur, it had relatively gracile limb bones Gondwanatitan head.JPG
Guaibasaurus 1999 Caturrita Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Brazil Combines features of both early theropods and sauropodomorphs Guaibasaurus NT.jpg
Gualicho 2016 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Originally described as having highly reduced arms with only two fingers, convergent with tyrannosaurids, although one study suggests a third finger was present[19] Gualicho shinyae restoration.jpg
Huinculsaurus 2020 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina The youngest known elaphrosaurine Huinculsaurus LM.png
Ilokelesia 1998 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Its skull retains some basal abelisauroid traits Ilokelesia.jpg
Ingentia 2018 Quebrada del Barro Formation (Late Triassic, Rhaetian)  Argentina The earliest known very large sauropodomorph[20]
Irritator 1996 Romualdo Formation (Early Cretaceous, Albian)  Brazil May have been the apex predator of its habitat, hunting both aquatic and terrestrial prey[21] Irritator Life Reconstruction.jpg
Isaberrysaura 2017 Los Molles Formation (Middle Jurassic, Bajocian)  Argentina Potentially a basal stegosaur[22]
Isasicursor 2019 Chorrillo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Four individuals of different ages were found together, suggesting it lived in herds[23]
Itapeuasaurus 2019 Alcântara Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Brazil Only known from six vertebrae
Kaijutitan 2019 Sierra Barrosa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina One of the latest-surviving basal titanosaurs
Katepensaurus 2013 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Distinguished by a certain opening in its dorsal vertebrae
Kurupi 2021 Marília Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Brazil Would have had a stiff tail as indicated by the anatomy of its caudal vertebrae Life restoration of abelisaurid theropod Kurupi itaata.png
Lajasvenator 2020 Mulichinco Formation (Early Cretaceous, Valanginian)  Argentina One of the smallest known allosauroids Lajasvenator ascheriae J..jpg
Lapampasaurus 2012 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Known from a partial skeleton lacking the skull
Laplatasaurus 1929 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina
 Uruguay?
Osteoderms have been assigned to this taxon although this referral is uncertain
Laquintasaura 2014 La Quinta Formation (Early Jurassic, Hettangian)  Venezuela One study recovered it as a basal thyreophoran[24] despite the fact no osteoderms have been found Laquintasaura fixed by Tom Parker.png
Lavocatisaurus 2018 Rayoso Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Argentina May have possessed a keratinous beak[25] Lavocatisaurus Dibujo Gabriel Lio.jpg
Leinkupal 2014 Bajada Colorada Formation (Early Cretaceous, Berriasian to Valanginian)  Argentina The youngest known diplodocid
Leonerasaurus 2011 Las Leoneras Formation (Early Jurassic?)  Argentina Has an unusual combination of basal and derived traits Leonerasaurus NT.jpg
Lessemsaurus 1999 Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Argentina Grew very large despite lacking the anatomical traits usually seen as supporting gigantism[20]
Leyesaurus 2011 Quebrada del Barro Formation (Early Jurassic)  Argentina Its teeth were moderately heterodont
Ligabueino 1996 La Amarga Formation (Early Cretaceous, Barremian to Aptian)  Argentina Known from a single, very small, juvenile skeleton
Ligabuesaurus 2006 Lohan Cura Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Argentina Its forelimbs were extremely long, with similar proportions to those of brachiosaurids[26] Ligabuesaurus.png
Limaysaurus 2004 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Possessed elongated neural spines on its dorsal vertebrae
Llukalkan 2021 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina May have had a keen sense of hearing due to the shape of its ear[27]
Loncosaurus 1899 Cardiel Formation?/Metasiete Formation? (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Poorly known
Loricosaurus 1929 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina Potentially synonymous with Neuquensaurus or Saltasaurus
Lucianovenator 2017 Quebrada del Barro Formation (Late Triassic, Norian to Rhaetian)  Argentina Only known from a few bones, but it is nonetheless more common than other Rhaetian theropods Lucianovenator restoration.jpg
Macrocollum 2018 Candelária Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Brazil One of the oldest sauropodomorphs with an extremely elongated neck Macrocollum NT.jpg
Macrogryphosaurus 2007 Sierra Barrosa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Preserves a series of mineralized plates along the side of the torso Macrogryphosaurus life reconstruction.png
Mahuidacursor 2019 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina Its holotype was sexually mature but not fully grown
Maip 2022 Chorrillo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina Possibly the largest megaraptorid
Malarguesaurus 2008 Los Bastos Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Large and robustly built
Manidens 2011 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina May have been arboreal due to the structure of its feet, with toes adapted for grasping[28] Manidens.jpg
Mapusaurus 2006 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Seven specimens of different growth stages are known, possibly suggesting that lived and/or hunted in packs Mapusaurus Roseae restoration.png
Maxakalisaurus 2006 Adamantina Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Brazil Unusually for a sauropod, it had ridged teeth MaxakalisaurusTopai Miniat.jpg
Megaraptor 1998 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Turonian to Coniacian)  Argentina Possessed a large, strongly curved claw on its first finger Megaraptor namunhuaiquii.jpg
Mendozasaurus 2003 Sierra Barrosa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Had spherical osteoderms that were probably located in rows along the flanks[29]
Menucocelsior 2022 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina Coexisted with multiple other titanosaurs that may have niche-partitioned[30]
Microcoelus 1893 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian to Campanian)  Argentina May be a synonym of Neuquensaurus
Mirischia 2004 Romualdo Formation (Early Cretaceous, Albian)  Brazil Its holotype preserves an intestine Mirischia asymmetrica by Ademar Pereira.JPG
Murusraptor 2016 Sierra Barrosa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Had a brain morphology similar to that of tyrannosaurids but its sensory capabilities were closer to the level of allosauroids[31] Murusraptor NT small.jpg
Mussaurus 1979 Laguna Colorada Formation (Early Jurassic, Sinemurian)  Argentina Multiple specimens from different growth stages are known. Juveniles may have been quadrupedal and shifted to bipedality as adults[32] Mussaurus patagonicus life restoration.png
Muyelensaurus 2007 Plottier Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian to Santonian)  Argentina Relatively gracile for a titanosaur
Narambuenatitan 2011 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Its neural spines are very similar to those of Epachthosaurus
Neuquenraptor 2005 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Potentially synonymous with Unenlagia[33] Neuquenraptor argentinus by PaleoGeek.png
Neuquensaurus 1992 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina One of the smallest known titanosaurs
Nhandumirim 2019 Santa Maria Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Brazil Originally described as a theropod[34] but has since been reinterpreted as a sauropodomorph[35]
Niebla 2020 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Had a uniquely-built scapulocoracoid that is only found in this genus and Carnotaurus Niebla antiqua.jpg
Ninjatitan 2021 Bajada Colorada Formation (Early Cretaceous, Berriasian to Valanginian)  Argentina The oldest known titanosaur
Noasaurus 1980 Lecho Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina Originally mistakenly believed to have possessed a dromaeosaurid-like sickle claw Noasaurus-sketch3.jpg
Nopcsaspondylus 2007 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Named from a single, lost vertebra
Notoceratops 1918 Laguna Palacios Formation?/Pehuenche Formation? (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina If a ceratopsian it would be the only South American member of the group
Notocolossus 2016 Plottier Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian to Santonian)  Argentina Unusually for a sauropod, its unguals were truncated Notocolossus NT small.jpg
Notohypsilophodon 1998 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Only known from a skull-less, juvenile skeleton
Nullotitan 2019 Chorrillo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Would have niche-partitioned with smaller ornithopods
Orkoraptor 2008 Cerro Fortaleza Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Had highly specialized dentition similar to that of maniraptorans Orkoraptor drawing.jpg
Overoraptor 2020 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Shows adaptations for both flight and cursoriality Overoraptor chimentoi.png
Overosaurus 2013 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina One of the smallest known aeolosaurins Overosaurus life restoration.jpg
Padillasaurus 2015 Paja Formation (Early Cretaceous, Barremian)  Colombia Originally described as a brachiosaurid[36] although it could also be a somphospondylian[37]
Pampadromaeus 2011 Santa Maria Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Brazil Some features of its jaws are similar to those of theropods Pampadromaeus life.png
Pamparaptor 2011 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Turonian to Coniacian)  Argentina Had a troodontid-like metatarsal Pamparaptor micros.png
Panamericansaurus 2010 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Known from a single partial skeleton
Pandoravenator 2017 Cañadón Calcáreo Formation (Late Jurassic, Oxfordian to Tithonian)  Argentina Inconsistent in phylogenetic placement
Panphagia 2009 Ischigualasto Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Argentina Was omnivorous as indicated by its heterodont dentition Panphagia NT.jpg
Patagonykus 1996 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Turonian to Coniacian)  Argentina Its discovered allowed researchers to connect Alvarezsaurus and parvicursorines[38] Patagonykuspuertai.jpg
Patagosaurus 1979 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Known from remains of adults and juveniles, depicting how various features developed in sauropods as they aged Patagosaurus.jpg
Patagotitan 2017 Cerro Barcino Formation (Early Cretaceous, Albian)  Argentina One of the largest dinosaurs known from reasonably complete remains Patagotitan.png
Pellegrinisaurus 1996 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina May have lived inland unlike other contemporaneous titanosaurs[39]
Petrobrasaurus 2011 Plottier Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian to Santonian)  Argentina Shares somes features with lognkosaurs, but its membership within this clade cannot be confirmed
Piatnitzkysaurus 1979 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina One of the few early theropods with a well-preserved braincase Piatnitzkysaurus floresi by Paleocolour.jpg
Pilmatueia 2018 Mulichinco Formation (Early Cretaceous, Valanginian)  Argentina Closely related to Amargasaurus[40]
Pitekunsaurus 2008 Anacleto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Known from several bones from different parts of the body, including a braincase
Powellvenator 2017 Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Argentina Some of this genus' remains were originally associated with those of a pseudosuchian[41]
Puertasaurus 2005 Cerro Fortaleza Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Large but only known from very few remains Puertasaurus reuili.png
Punatitan 2020 Ciénaga del Río Huaco Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Contemporary with Bravasaurus but was most likely distantly related[42]
Pycnonemosaurus 2002 Unnamed formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Brazil Potentially the largest known abelisaurid[43] Pycnonemosaurus head.jpg
Quetecsaurus 2014 Lisandro Formation (Late Cretaceous, Turonian)  Argentina Its humerus was uniquely-shaped Quetecsaurus.jpg
Quilmesaurus 2001 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Had proportionally robust legs despite its small size Quilmesaurus curriei.jpg
Rayososaurus 1996 Candeleros Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian)  Argentina Very similar to Rebbachisaurus despite only being known from scant remains
Rinconsaurus 2003 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina Unusually, its caudal vertebrae had a repeating pattern of procoely, amphicoely, opisthocoely, and biconvex states Rinconsaurus test 2.jpg
Riojasaurus 1969 Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Argentina Although commonly depicted as quadrupedal, the structure of its shoulder girdle suggests it was bipedal Riojasaurus NT.jpg
Rocasaurus 2000 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Small for a sauropod yet was very robust
Saltasaurus 1980 Lecho Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Argentina Possessed osteoderms in the form of large round nodules connected by a mass of smaller plates Saltasaurus dinosaur.png
Santanaraptor 1999 Romualdo Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian to Albian)  Brazil Preserves soft tissues including the remains of skin, muscle, and possibly blood vessels[44][45]
Sarmientosaurus 2016 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Analysis of its inner ear suggests it held its head downwards, possibly indicating a preference for low-growing plants
Saturnalia 1999 Santa Maria Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian)  Brazil Known from three partial skeletons Saturnalia NT small.jpg
Secernosaurus 1979 Lago Colhué Huapí Formation, Los Alamitos Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina Some remains were originally misidentified as belonging to a southern species of Kritosaurus
Sektensaurus 2019 Lago Colhué Huapí Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina The first non-hadrosaurid ornithopod recovered from central Patagonia
Skorpiovenator 2008 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Had an unusually short and deep skull Skorpiovenator bustingorryi.jpg
Spectrovenator 2020 Quiricó Formation (Early Cretaceous, Barremian to Aptian)  Brazil Its holotype was found underneath a sauropod skeleton Spectrovenator life reconstrution.png
Staurikosaurus 1970 Santa Maria Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian to Norian)  Brazil May have been a rare component of its environment, with only two specimens known Staurikosaurus new NT.jpg
Stegouros 2021 Dorotea Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Chile Possessed a "macuahuitl" at the end of its tail, made of a connected "frond" of pointed osteoderms Stegouros elengassen original Luis Pérez López.jpg
Tachiraptor 2014 La Quinta Formation (Early Jurassic, Hettangian)  Venezuela Closely related to ceratosaurs and tetanurans[46]
Talenkauen 2004 Cerro Fortaleza Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina May have practiced parental care as an adult and a hatchling have been found together Talenkauen santacrucensis 1.jpg
Tapuiasaurus 2011 Quiricó Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian)  Brazil One of the few titanosaurs of which a complete skull is known Tapuiasaurus NT.jpg
Tehuelchesaurus 1999 Cañadón Calcáreo Formation (Late Jurassic, Oxfordian to Tithonian)  Argentina Preserves impressions of scaly skin Tehuelchesaurus benetezii.jpg
Thanos 2020 São José do Rio Preto Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Brazil Only known from a single vertebra. The generic name honors the Marvel Comics villain Thanos Thanos simonattoi.png
Tralkasaurus 2020 Huincul Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Exhibits a conflict blend of characteristics from basal and derived abelisauroids
Tratayenia 2018 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina Potentially the youngest known megaraptoran[47]
Traukutitan 2011 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina Retained basal features in its caudal vertebrae despite its late age
Trigonosaurus 2005 Serra da Galga Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Brazil Before it was formally described, it had been informally referred to as the "Peirópolis titanosaur"
Triunfosaurus 2017 Rio Piranhas Formation (Early Cretaceous, Berriasian to Valanginian)  Brazil Originally described as a titanosaur[48] but similarities have been noted with basal somphospondylians[49]
Tyrannotitan 2005 Cerro Barcino Formation (Early Cretaceous, Aptian)  Argentina Unlike other carcharodontosaurids, its sacral and caudal vertebrae were not pneumatic Tyrannotitan Chubutensis Reconstruction .jpg
Uberabatitan 2008 Serra da Galga Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Brazil Several individuals are known, some of which are very large
Unaysaurus 2004 Caturrita Formation (Late Triassic, Carnian to Norian)  Brazil Described as the first plateosaurid-grade sauropodomorph from Brazil Unaysaurus.jpg
Unenlagia 1997 Portezuelo Formation (Late Cretaceous, Coniacian)  Argentina Could potentially be adapted for flapping due to the structure of its shoulder girdle[50] Unenlagia comahuensis.jpg
Unquillosaurus 1979 Los Blanquitos Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian)  Argentina Has been suggested to be a dromaeosaurid[51] or a carcharodontosaurid[52]
Velocisaurus 1991 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina Unusually, its third metatarsal is the thickest Velocisaurus.jpg
Vespersaurus 2019 Rio Paraná Formation (Late Cretaceous)  Brazil Possessed raised claws on its second and fourth toes, making it functionally monodactyl, a possible adaptation to its desert habitat Vespersaurus paranaensis recon.jpg
Viavenator 2016 Bajo de la Carpa Formation (Late Cretaceous, Santonian)  Argentina May have relied on quick movements of its head and gaze stabilization when hunting Viavenator.jpg
Volkheimeria 1979 Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Early Jurassic, Toarcian)  Argentina Its neural spines were very low and flat
Willinakaqe 2010 Allen Formation (Late Cretaceous, Campanian to Maastrichtian)  Argentina As originally described, it represented a chimera of two different taxa, one of which was later named Bonapartesaurus[12]
Xenotarsosaurus 1986 Bajo Barreal Formation (Late Cretaceous, Cenomanian to Turonian)  Argentina Had an unusually-shaped astragalus and calcaneum
Yamanasaurus 2019 Río Playas Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Ecuador The northernmost saltasaurine known to date[42] Yamanasaurus.jpg
Ypupiara 2021 Serra da Galga Formation (Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)  Brazil May have been a piscivore due to the shape of its teeth[53] Ypupiara lopai.png
Zapalasaurus 2006 La Amarga Formation (Early Cretaceous, Hauterivian to Aptian)  Argentina Known from an incomplete skeleton, including several caudal vertebrae Zapalasaurus.png
Zupaysaurus 2003 Los Colorados Formation (Late Triassic, Norian)  Argentina Although commonly depicted with head crests, they may in fact be misplaced lacrimal bones[54] Zupaysaurus.jpg

Dubious, uncertain, and invalid genera[edit]

  • Angaturama limai: Only known from the tip of the snout. It may belong to the contemporary Irritator, but it could also represent its own taxon.
  • "Bayosaurus pubica": An abelisaurid known from partial postcranial remains.
  • Gnathovorax cabreirai: Known from a well-preserved, almost complete specimen. It may not be a dinosaur.
  • Herrerasaurus ischigualastensis: The type genus of a family of basal predators called herrerasaurids. They may represent early dinosaurs, possibly saurischians, but they could also be just outside Dinosauria.
  • Oxalaia quilombensis: Potentially a junior synonym of Spinosaurus.
  • Sanjuansaurus gordilloi: A herrerasaurid that, like the other members of its group, could be non-dinosaurian.
  • Taurovenator violantei: Only known from a single postorbital, it may be a junior synonym of Mapusaurus.
  • "Ubirajara jubatus": Known from a single specimen that preserves impressions of feathers, including display feathers on its sides. Its description was retracted before it could be published due to allegations that the specimen was illegally exported from Brazil.


Timeline[edit]

This is a timeline of selected dinosaurs from the list above. Time is measured in Ma, megaannum, along the x-axis. Carnivores are shown in red, herbivores in green and omnivores in blue.

MesozoicTriassicJurassicCretaceousSaltasaurusBaurutitanAustroraptorCarnotaurusAbelisaurusGasparinisauraPycnonemosaurusDreadnoughtusSecernosaurusQuilmesaurusAustroposeidonPuertasaurusThanos simonattoiMahuidacursorAlvarezsaurusNeuquensaurusOverosaurusViavenatorVelocisaurusAchillesaurusMalarguesaurusMacrogryphosaurusBayosaurusAnabisetiaOrkoraptorAlnashetriEkrixinatosaurusGualicho shinyaeLimaysaurusAndesaurusBicentenariaBuitreraptorMapusaurusSkorpiovenatorArgentinosaurusGiganotosaurusPatagotitanOxalaiaSantanaraptorMirischiaIrritatorTyrannotitanAmazonsaurusGenyodectesAmargastegosAmargasaurusZapalasaurusLigabueinoPadillasaurusLeinkupalBajadasaurusChilesaurusTehuelchesaurusPandoravenatorIsaberrysauraEoabelisaurusCondorraptorManidensPatagosaurusPiatnitzkysaurusLeonerasaurusAmygdalodonTachiraptorLeyesaurusAdeopapposaurusLaquintasauraLucianovenatorZupaysaurusColoradisaurusGuaibasaurusUnaysaurusLessemsaurusStaurikosaurusChromogisaurusSanjuansaurusPanphagiaEoraptorEodromaeusHerrerasaurusBuriolestesMesozoicTriassicJurassicCretaceous

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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