List of Southwestern Moundbuilders head football coaches

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As of conclusion of the 2011 season, former head coach Dennis Franchione has compiled a record of 193–107–2; 4–3 in bowl games, and 6–5 in NAIA or NCAA playoff games.

The Southwestern College Moundbuilders program is a college football team that represents Southwestern College in the Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference, a part of the NAIA. The team has had 28 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1895. The current coach is Brad Griffin, who was announced on January 21, 2015 as the new head coach.[1] Griffin replaces Ken Crandall who resigned at the conclusion of the 2014 season.[2]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
No. Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

No. Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs Awards
0 Unknown 1895, 1901–1902 6 3 3 0 .500
1 John Jacob "J. J." Thiel 1903–1904 13 9 3 1 .731
2 Harry Huston 1905 7 3 4 0 .429
3 Jay Mack Love 1906–1907 17 8 7 2 .529
4 Frank Armin 1908 7 3 4 0 .429
5 Fred H. Clapp 1909–1913 42 24 12 6 .643
6 Willis S. "Billy" Bates 1914–1925 102 52 41 9 .554
7 William "Bill" Monypenny 1926–1936 95 33 53 9 .395
8 Don Copper 1937–1939 27 5 21 1 .204
9 Richard C. "Dick" Nolan 1940–1941 20 10 8 2 .550
10 Henry Brock 1942 9 4 3 2 .556
X No Team 1943–1945
11 Arthur D. "Art" Kahler 1946–1947 19 14 4 1 .763
12 Fred Dittman 1948 10 7 3 0 .700
13 Harold S. Hunt 1949–1951 27 6 18 3 .278
14 William M. "Bill" Carroll 1952–1953 18 2 15 1 .139
15 Robert "Bob" Hower 1954–1958 46 11 31 4 .283
16 Bob Dvorak 1959–1961 27 19 6 2 .741
17 Ray Morrison 1962–1963 20 11 9 0 .550
18 Harold "Bud" Elliott 1964–1968 47 37 7 3 .819
19 Wes Buller 1969–1971 27 15 11 1 .574
20 Jim Paramore 1972–1976 45 19 26 0 .422
21 Phil Hower 1977–1980 36 22 14 0 .611
22 Dennis Franchione 1981–1982 20 14 4 2 .750
23 Charlie Cowdrey 1983–1991 94 64 29 1 .686
24 Jake Cabell 1992 9 5 4 0 .556
25 Monty Lewis 1993–2001 92 59 33 0 .641
26 Chris Douglas 2002–2006 49 20 29 0 .408
27 Ken Crandall 2007–2014 74 21 53 0 .284 19 44 .302
28 Brad Griffin 2015– 74 0 0 0 0 0

Details[edit]

The following are details on coaches that do not have articles on Wikipedia. For coaches with articles on Wikipedia, see links in the table above.

John Jacob Thiel[edit]

Although Southwestern competed in football as far back ast 1895,[6] Coach Thiel was the first official head college football coach for the Southwestern College Moundbuilders in Winfield, Kansas, and he held that position for two seasons, from 1903 until 1904. His coaching record at Southwestern was 9 wins, 5 losses, and 1 tie. As of the conclusion of the 2009 season, this ranks him 17th at Southwestern in total wins and fifth at the school in winning percentage (0.73077).[7]

After his work at the collegiate level as a professor and coach, he moved to Ritzville, Washington near his family and took up farming.[8] He died in Spokane at the age of 69.[9]

Frank Armin[edit]

Frank Armin was the fourth coach for the Moundbuilders and held that position for the 1908 season. Armin was also the basketball coach at Southwestern for the 1908-1909 season. He was the first basketball coach on record for the school, and the team produced six wins and three losses.[10]

Fred Dittman[edit]

The 12th head coach was Fred Dittman, who also served in World War II with General Patton’s Army and rose to the rank of captain. In 1946, Dittmann was assistant football coach to Art Kahler at Southwestern and then served as head football coach for the 1948 season while he pursued a master’s degree in chemistry from the University of Kansas.[11]

Robert Hower[edit]

Hower was the 15th coach[12] for Southwestern[13] and held the position from 1954 to 1958.

Hower also coached men's basketball at Southwestern and was the 13th person on record to hold that post.[14] He coached for thirteen seasons, from 1955 until 1967 and then again for the 1970-1971 season. His record was 32 wins and 37 losses and the team secured two Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference championships in 1961 and again in 1963.[15]

Hower served as the athletic director at Southwestern until his sudden death from complications from an automobile accident in 1972.[16] His son Phil Hower would go on to coach the Moundbuilders from 1977 until the conclusion of the 1980 season.

Phil Hower[edit]

Hower was the 21st football coach for program and he held that position 4 seasons, from 1977 to 1980. He was mentor to future Minnesota coach Jerry Kill and son of former Moundbulder athletic director and coach Robert Hower.

Hower's love and passion to play the game of football continued after he graduated and was coaching high school football. He remained active and an avid supporter of the program, playing in an alumni game and receiving a shoulder injury.[17]

Hower continually worked in coaching, including working as the linebackers coach at Friends University in Wichita, Kansas under head coach Monty Lewis.[18] Hower died in Winfield on April 19, 2014 at the age of 72.[19]

Chris Douglas[edit]

Douglass was the twenty-sixth head coach at Southwestern, where his teams compiled a record of 20 wins and 29 losses. Before coaching at Southwestern, Douglas served as an assistant coach at Abilene Christian University, Jamestown College, and at Southwestern.[20] At Southwestern, Douglass would coach against his mentor and former Southwestern head coach Monty Lewis.[21] Douglas stepped down as head coach after the 2006 season[22] and was replaced by Ken Crandall.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[3]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[4]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brad Griffin to Lead Southwestern College Football Team". Southwestern Moundbuilders. January 21, 2015. Retrieved January 29, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Crandall Resigns as Head Football Coach at Southwestern College". Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference. November 19, 2014. Retrieved November 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  5. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  6. ^ College Football Data Warehouse Southwestern College Records
  7. ^ Southwestern College Football Records
  8. ^ The Journal-Times "John Thiel, Sr. Dies Suddenly" February 24, 1921
  9. ^ Eastern Washington Genealogical Society Blog "EWGS Presidents: Leora Cookingham Thiel" November 4, 2009
  10. ^ Hovpen Sports Southwestern College Basketball
  11. ^ Southwestern College in Winfield, KS
  12. ^ Kiowa News "Father-Son Banquet" April 12, 1961
  13. ^ WINFIELD AND THE WALNUT VALLEY "THE ATHLETIC PICTURE" A HISTORY COMMISSIONED BY THE WINFIELD ARTS COUNCIL AND THE BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION, Gilliland's Publishing Arkansas City, Kansas 1975
  14. ^ Hovpen Sports Southwestern College Basketball
  15. ^ "Men's Basketball Coaches Records". Southwestern College. Retrieved 2008-02-28. 
  16. ^ El Dorado Times, "Obituaries" April 22, 1972
  17. ^ Kiowa News "Injured in Alumni Game" September 19, 1968
  18. ^ Crimson Chronicle Meet the coaches
  19. ^ "Hower coached, taught hundreds of students". Southwestern College. Retrieved August 6, 2014. 
  20. ^ CJOnline.com | Handheld Version | Briefly in sports 05/29/02
  21. ^ Arkansas City Taveler "Monty Lewis named football coach at Friends" By Rama Peroo, January 17, 2003
  22. ^ Football coach resigns after five years - Collegian Front Page