List of infantry divisions of the Soviet Union 1917–57

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Divisional banner of the 50th Guards Rifle Division

This is a list of infantry divisions of the Soviet Union 1917–1957. It lists infantry divisions in the Soviet Union from the 1917 Revolution to the reorganisation of the Soviet Army in the aftermath of the Stalinist era. Mechanised Divisions were formed during 1945–46, and then all remaining Rifle Divisions were converted to Motor Rifle Divisions in 1957.

The main source used in the compilation of this page was Robert G. Poirier and Albert Z. Conner's The Red Army Order of Battle in the Great Patriotic War, published by Novato: Presidio Press, in 1985. Most of the details not specifically cited in this page are sourced from Poirer and Connor. Thus this page represents primarily pre-1989, Western scholarship; however new materials available since 1989, primarily A.G. Lenski's 2000 book, have also been inserted where available.

Divisions of the Russian Civil War[edit]

Many infantry (pekhotniye), literally 'movement', and rifle (strelkoviye), literally 'sharpshooter', divisions were inherited by the Workers-Peasants Army from the former Imperial Russian Army, but were renamed in the spirit of the Revolutionary times, often with names including words such as "Proletariat", "workers and peasants", or other titles that differentiated them from the past. They employed some of the 48,000 former Tsarist officers and 214,000 Tsarist NCOs along with over 10,000 administrative personnel. Initially the new Bolshevik rifle divisions were composed of rifle brigades, and included:

two or three brigades of two regiments each[1]
an artillery brigade
a cavalry regiment
a communications battalion
a reconnaissance company
an engineer battalion
an air (balloon) detachment (otryad)
an aviation group (aircraft)
rear services

The division was to have an establishment of 26,972, with 14,220 combat troops, and depended on 10,048 horses to manoeuvre. Due to difficulties with recruiting volunteers into the armed forces early in the Russian Civil War, conscription was introduced on the 29 May 1918, and all infantry divisions were renamed into rifle divisions on 11 October 1918.

The first six of the 11 formed divisions were those formed in the Petrograd, Moscow, Orel, Yaroslav, Privolzhsk and Ural okrugs. However, the divisions were initially only numbered, eventually 1st through to 47th by 1919. Five of these divisions were also named.

The Russian Civil War divisions were allocated to the various Fronts, including:

  • Internal districts (reserve) – 1st to 11th divisions
  • Northern Front – 18th and 19th divisions
  • Eastern Front – 20th to 22nd, and 24th to 31st divisions
  • Caspian-Caucasus Front – 32nd to 36th divisions
  • Southern Front – 12th to 16th, 23rd, and 37th to 42nd divisions
  • Western Front – 17th, 'Lithuanian', and Western Rifle Divisions
  • In Petrograd headquarters command – 1st and 2nd 'Latvian' divisions
  • In reserve of the Kiev headquarters command – 'Ukrainian' division

Other Civil War rifle divisions[edit]

  • 1st Don Rifle Division – formed and disbanded in 1920 in the Penza-Saratov area of the Southern Front.
  • 1st Communist Rifle division – formed in Tsaritsyn in 1918 and disbanded in 1919, its troops absorbed into the 4th Rifle Division as a brigade.
  • 1st Red-Urals Rifle Division – formed in 1919 by the Eastern Front, and reformed as the Special Brigade of the 1st Revolutionary Army of Labour.
  • 1st Novgorod Infantry Division – former Novgorod Infantry Division, was formed in April and disbanded in September 1918.
  • 1st Orel Infantry Division – formed in the Orel area in April 1918 and disbanded by absorption into Novouzensk and Ural Infantry Divisions during Roslavl operations.
  • 1st Ryazansk Infantry Division – formed in April 1918 from an armed detachment, and transferred to the Moscow okrug commissariat, but disbanded in September 1918 by transfer of its personnel into the 2nd Infantry Division.
  • 1st Siberian Rifle Division – Formed 22 October 1920 as the 28th Rifle Division VNUS for railway protection and defense in Siberia. Became 28th Rifle Division on 25 December 1920, then 1st Siberian Rifle Division on 19 February 1921. Disbanded on 13 June 1921 with units transferred to 26th Rifle Division and the 35th Rifle Division as replacements.[2]
  • 1st "Simbirsk" Rifle Division formed 1918, redesignated 24th Rifle Division in 1922.
  • 1st Petrograd Infantry Division—Formed at Petrograd, May 1918. Elements of the division were sent to the Eastern Front
  • 1st Rifle Division (1918–1920) – Formed in the lakes region around Petrograd. Fought around Olonets with the 6th and 7th Armies from November 1918 into 1920. Defended the Aleksandrovsk-Melitopol railroad line on the Southern Front in August 1920. Awarded the Order of the Red Banner in October 1920. Reorganized as a brigade of the 15th Inzensk Rifle Division in November 1920.
  • 1st Vitebsk Rifle Division – Consolidated into the 17th Rifle Division on 23 Oct 1918.[3]
  • 2nd Rifle Division — Formed at Moscow, September 1918. Fought at Ufa on the Eastern Front, April–July 1919. Fought against Yudenich with the 7th Army, October–December 1919. Fought in the Polish-Soviet War in the Western Front, May–August 1920, and against Stanisław Bułak-Bałachowicz's forces in October 1920.
  • 2nd Smolensk Rifle Division – Consolidated into the 17th Rifle Division on 23 Oct 1918.[3]
  • 2nd Tula Rifle Division – Formed August 1918 in Tula. Disbanded October 1918. Personnel and equipment transferred to the 8th Rifle Division.[4]
  • 5th Vitebsk Rifle Division (1918–1926) – Formed 1918 as 2nd Penza Infantry Division in Penza. Renamed 5th Rifle Division in October 1918. It was awarded the honorific "Saratov" in 1920. The division received the honorific "Vitebsk" in 1921, which replaced the "Saratov" designation.[5]
  • 6th 'Orlovski' Rifle Division (1918–1927) – former Gatchina division, and 3rd Petrograd pekhotnaya division; formed at Oryol area, which was to become part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 16th Rifle Division – The Division was formed in May 1918 in the Tambov region from Ukrainian detachments of the Red Guards.[6]
  • 17th Rifle Division – Formed on 23 October 1918 from the 1st Vitebsk Rifle Division and 2nd Smolensk Rifle Divisions by the Military council of Smolensk.[3]
  • 26th Rifle Division – Formed 3 Nov 1918 on the Eastern Front, ended the Civil War on the Chinese border.[7]
  • 33rd Kuban Rifle Division – Formed 20 March 1919 with the 12th Army as the 33rd Rifle Division. Became 33rd Kuban Rifle Division 2 December 1919, used to form the Kuban Cavalry Division on 4 September 1920.[8]
  • 33rd Rifle Division (10th Terek-Dagestan Army) – Formed 8 December 1920 and absorbed into 14th Rifle Division 9 May 1921.[9]
  • 44th Rifle Division
  • 51st Rifle Division – Formed in July 1919 from elements of the Special Northern Detachment, the Special Brigade, and the Vyza'ma Fortress Brigade.[10]
  • Trans-Dnepr Rifle Division—Formed from partisan units of the Ukrainian Front, February 1919. Fought at Mariupol, Odessa, and Sevastopol, March–April 1919. Divided into the Crimean Red Army, 6th Ukrainian Rifle Division and 7th Insurgent Rifle Division, May 1919.
  • 7th Insurgent Rifle Division—Formed from the 3rd Brigade of the Trans-Dnepr Rifle Division, May 1919. Fought in the Donbass, May 1919. Left the RKKA and became the core of the Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine (RIAU), August 1919.

The establishment and organisation of the divisions (N 220/34) had changed by the end of 1918 to increase the number of regiments in brigades to three, while eliminating the artillery brigade headquarters, leaving the nine artillery divizions (battalions) and one horse artillery battery to be allocated to rifle brigades. An armoured auto detachment (otryad) was also instituted. By 1921 the establishment of the rifle division had changed substantially in accordance with TO&E N 1400/246 for peace-time, with two brigades and only 15,876 personnel, and the reduction of artillery to two battalions and one battery, and the cavalry from four to three squadron regiment.

From 10 June 1922 the organisation of rifle divisions war changed from brigade to regiment structure, with three regiments in each. The establishment of divisions stationed in the border areas was reduced to 8,705 personnel, and those in the interior regions to 6,725, including the reduction to a single cavalry squadron. The number of divisions was increased to 49.

Divisions of the interwar years[edit]

Due to increasing economic difficulties in the post-war USSR, the armed forces were substantially reduced, and from 8 August 1923 transferred to the territorial system of organisation. All divisions were reduced to an establishment of 1,437 permanent cadre and 8,084 conscripted personnel. These new divisions were initially called militia-rifle divisions (Russian: милиционной-стрелковая дивизия), and later were renamed territorial-militia divisions (Russian: территориально-милиционная дивизия). However, despite reduction in number of service personnel, the number of territorial-militia divisions quadrupled by summer 1928.

The territorial principle of manning the Red Army was introduced in the mid-1920s. In each region able-bodied men were called up for a limited period of active duty in territorial unit, which comprised about half the Army's strength, each year, for five years.[11] The first call-up period was for three months, with one month a year thereafter. A regular cadre provided a stable nucleus. By 1925 this system provided 46 of the 77 infantry divisions and one of the eleven cavalry divisions. The remainder consisted of regular officers and enlisted personnel serving two-year stints.

Most of the divisions that participated in the Russian Civil War were disbanded by 1927, however, Leon Trotsky initiated a formation of the new armed force with a professional cadre which was supported in its evolution even after his departure from Soviet Union. The reform in the rifle forces that begun in 1924 did create some notable changes, including commencement of adding names to the regular and newly formed territorial divisions, and creation of national divisions, notably one Belarus, four Ukrainian, two Georgian, one Armenian, and one Azerbaijanian divisions. In 1928 1st and 3rd Turkestan, and in 1929 an Azerbaijanian divisions were reorganised as mountain-rifle divisions. Of the 70 rifle division, 41 were now territorial in their establishment.

During the 1930s the RKKA infantry forces were not only expanded, but also substantially reorganised, in part due to substantial input of military theorists into their doctrinal development, such as that of Mikhail Tukhachevsky who's 1934 report to the Defence Committee included 13 types of infantry division divisions. On the 31 January 1935 the Committee decreed adoption of a single 13 thousand personnel peace-time establishment for a rifle division which included:

three rifle regiments
one artillery regiment:
one tank battalion (mixed)
separate reconnaissance battalion (light tank company, cavalry squadron and SP artillery battery)
communications battalion
separate anti-aircraft machine-gun company
sapper company
aviation flight
rear services

This structure more than double the number of combat personnel in the division from the 1929 establishment of 20.2% to 41.7%. In May 1937 the military commissars were added to the establishment of all RKKA military forces.

On 29 November 1937 four types of structures for rifle forces were established:

Far Eastern District divisions – 10,000 establishment
Cadre divisions – 7,000 (6950) establishment
Cadre mountain divisions – 4,000 establishment
Cadre territorial divisions – 6,000 (5,220) establishment. These lacked the communications, reconnaissance and sapper battalions.

The territorial system was reorganised, with all remaining formations converted to 'cadre' divisions, in 1937 and 1938,[12] with the cadre divisions retaining one territorial regiment until reorganisation that followed 1938 restructuring of all armed forces. Kamchatka and Sakhalin divisions were also added in the wake of the Soviet–Japanese Border Wars.

By 1938 there were plans to increase the number of rifle divisions in the RKKA from 98 to 173. These would include:

17 rifle divisions with 14 thousand personnel
1 rifle divisions with 12 thousand personnel (TO&E 04/400)
33 rifle divisions with 8,900 personnel (TO&E 04/100)
76 rifle divisions with 6 thousand personnel (TO&E 04/120)
33 rifle divisions with 3 thousand personnel
13 mountain-rifle divisions with 4 thousand personnel

The wartime strength of the new rifle division that was intended to include two artillery regiments was to have 18 thousand personnel, but none had been brought up to this strength by 1941.

Divisions of the Second World War[edit]

Two events shaped the evolution of the RKKA rifle divisions during the initial period of the Second World War: the decision in 1938 to reorganise the Army, in part due to and following the repressions of the officer corps in 1937, and the 1939 campaign in Poland, and later war against Finland.

In the course of the Second World War the Soviet Union's Red Army raised over four hundred and fifty numbered rifle divisions (infantry). Usually the rifle divisions were controlled by the higher headquarters of the Rifle Corps. But scores of these formations were reformed several times; the total number of divisional formations formed may have been as high as 2,000, according to Craig Crofoot.

On 22 June 1941 the Red Army had 103 divisions in the western military districts, of which 70 were organised according to peace-time TO&E 04/100 with 10-thousand bayonet strength (actual number of rifles 7,818), but brought up to the 12-thousand strength (TO&E 04/400), with another six at the 11-thousand strength. Another 78 rifle divisions in the interior military districts were organised according to peace-time TO&E 04/120 6-thousand (5,864) bayonet strength (actual number of rifles 3,685). The wartime organisation of the RKKA rifle division was 14-thousand (14,483) with 10,420 rifles, but only 20 western border divisions had been brought up to this establishment when the war begun.

Zaloga notes that the Red Army formed at least 42 'national' divisions during the Second World War, including four Azeri, five Armenian, and eight Georgian rifle divisions and a large number of cavalry divisions in Central Asia, including five Uzbek cavalry divisions.

Note on Designations[edit]

During the war, many divisions were formed, destroyed or otherwise disbanded, and reformed several times: A notional example, using imaginary designations, runs:

"The 501st Rifle Division (1st formation), readiness category B organised to 1937 tables may have been disbanded at Vyazma in 1941, and a new 501st Division (2nd formation), readiness category A organised on 1942 tables formed in Rostov thousands of km away, then renamed 200th Guards Rifle Division in 1944, and a new 501st (3rd formation), readiness category A organised to 1944 tables division formed in Minsk".

Rifle Divisions list[edit]

1–10[edit]

11–20[edit]

21–30[edit]

31–40[edit]

41–50[edit]

51–60[edit]

61–70[edit]

  • 61st Rifle Division — established at Balschov before 1933. Fought in southern Russia, Ukraine, Belorussia, and the Berlin Operation. With 28th Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 62nd Rifle Division — established Fastov in Sep 1939. With 15th Rifle Corps of 5th Army 22 June 1941. Disbanded Nov 1942. Recreated Apr 1943. Fought at Stalingrad and Kursk. With 31st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 63rd Mountain Rifle Division — established Tblisi before 1941, originally as 2nd Georgian Infantry Division.[44] The Division was a Georgian national formation with honour titles including 'of the Order of the Red Star Frunze.' Became rifle division 1938, disbanded June 1942 after being wiped out at Kerch. The 63rd Rifle Division was formed in June 1942 from the 8th Motor Rifle Division NKVD, became 52nd Guards Rifle Division November 1942. Recreated at Kaluga from the 45th and 86th Rifle Brigades in May 1943. Fought at Stalingrad, Kursk, and in the Belorussian Offensive. With 5th Army of the RVGK in May 1945.
  • 64th Rifle Division — established Smolensk before Feb 1939. Became 7th Guards Rifle Division Sep 1941. Recreated Mar 1942. Mutinied near Stalingrad Aug 1942. Fought at Minsk and Stalingrad. With 3rd Shock Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 65th Rifle Division — established at Chita Feb 1941. Fought near Leningrad and in the Petsamo-Kirkenes Operation. Became the 102nd Guards Rifle Division in Dec 1944.
  • 66th Rifle Division—traces its origins as a division to 1932. Fought in Far East in 1945.
  • 67th Rifle Division — established in the Leningrad area in the 1920s. Fought on Finnish front. With 14th Army in northern Norway May 1945.
  • 68th Mountain Rifle Division — established Baku before 1941. With 4th Army of the Transcaucasus Front in 5.45, located in Romania in 1946.
  • 69th Rifle Division — established Kuibyshev in the 1930s. Initially a motorized division, and has been listed as fighting with 28th Army. It appears now that (citing Soviet documents) that 69th Motorized Division became 107th Tank Division on 17 July 1941.[45] Recreated at Tashkent in Dec 1941. Fought at Kursk, Stettin, and in the Belorussian Operation. With 65th Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 70th Rifle Division — established 1934 at Kuybishev; fought in the Winter War with Finland, at Leningrad and Novgorod. Renamed 45th Guards Rifle Division October 1942.[46] Recreated at Moscow from 70th Rifle Brigade Mar 1943. Fought at Kursk and in Belorussia. With 43rd Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945.

71–80[edit]

81–90[edit]

91–100[edit]

101–110[edit]

  • 101st Motorized Rifle Division—Fought at Battle of Moscow 1941. On Sakhalin Island as the 101st Rifle Division May—Aug 1945, with the independent Sakhalin command.
  • 102nd Rifle Division—5450 чел. (начало сборов 1.06.41, Kharkov Military District). Disbanded Oct 1941. Recreated Chimkent Jan 1942. Again recreated from Far East NKVD Division at Khabarovsk June 1942, and joined 70th Army. Fought at Demyansk, Kursk, and in Belorussia. With 48th Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 103rd Rifle Division—fought in Winter War with Finland 1940. Converted to motorized division Mar 1941. Wiped out at Vyazma Oct 1941. Recreated at Samarkand Jan 1942. Fought at Kharkiv, wiped out at Izyum May 1942. Recreated ?; with 2nd Rifle Corps in Transbaikal Front in January 1945; still part of 2RC on Aug 9, 1945 and part of 36th Army, Transbaikal Front.
  • 104th Rifle Division—established at Kandalaksha before 12.39, fought at Petsamo and on Kandalaksha axis. With 57th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded with the Southern Group of Forces in the summer of 1945.[49]
  • 105th Rifle Division—established at Ussuriysk before June 1941, fought at Kharkiv in 1943 and stationed in the Far East. With the 25th Armyof the independent coastal group in the Far East May 1945.
  • 106th Rifle Division—established at Solotonoscha before 6.41, and with 9th Rifle Corps, Odessa Military District, in June 1941. Wiped out at Vyazma 10.41. Recreated October 1941 and destroyed at Kerch 11.41. Recreated at Krasnodar 12.41 and wiped out in the Caucasus 8.42. Created again at Chita from the Transbaikal NKVD Division 11.42, fought at Demyansk, Kursk, on the Dnieper River, and at Berlin. With 3rd Guards Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 107th Rifle Division—established at Moscow before 6.41, fought at Yelnaya and became 5th Guards Rifle Division in October 1941. Recreated at Tambov 3.42, fought in the Ukraine and at Kraków. With 60th Army of the 4th Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Northern Group of Forces.[21]
  • 108th Rifle Division—established at Vyazma Mar 1941. Composed of the 407th, 444th, and 539th Rifle and 575th Artillery Regiments.[51] Fought at Minsk, Smolensk, and Yartsevo in 1941. Later fought at Kursk and in Poland and Hungary. With 65th Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 109th Rifle Division—established as a motorized division Jul 1940 in the Transbaikal region. Wiped out at Smolensk Aug 1941. Recreated at Samarkand in Aug 1941. Wiped out at Sevastopol May 1942. Recreated at Leningrad Aug 1942. With 8th Army of the Leningrad Front May 1945.
  • 110th Rifle Division—with 50th Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945.

111–120[edit]

121–130[edit]

  • 121st Rifle Division—established at Bobruysk prior to 6.41, fought at Rylsk and Kiev. With 38th Army of the 4th Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 122nd Rifle Division—established at Rylsk 4.39, fought at Kandalaksha. With 57th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded with the Southern Group of Forces in the summer of 1945.[49]
  • 123rd Rifle Division—established at Vishny Volochek in 1939. Fought in Winter War with Finland, and subsequently in northern Russia. With 67th Army of the Leningrad Front 5.45.
  • 124th Rifle Division—established at Kirovograd 9.39 and wiped out near Kiev 9.41. Recreated at Voronezh, fought at Stalingrad and became the 50th Guards Rifle Division 11.42. Created again Schlusselberg from the 56th, 102nd, and 138th Rifle Brigades 4.43, fought at Mga, Neman, and in Manchuria. With 39th Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 125th Rifle Division—established at Kirov prior to 6.40, fought near Leningrad. With 21st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 126th Rifle Division—established at Moscow Dec 1940, and was with Eleventh Army in June 1941. Second division with same number established at Vorishilov Sep 1941. Original incarnation of division disbanded Dec 1941. Second incarnation of division fought at Stalingrad, Melitopol, and in the Ukraine and Crimea. With 43rd Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 127th Rifle Division—5600 men (начало сборов 10.06.41, Kharkov MD). Established at Kharkiv 7.40, fought at Yelna, became 2nd Guards Rifle Division 18.9.41. Recreated at Atkarsk 2.42, fought near Stalingrad, became 62nd Guards Rifle Division 1.43. Created again at Kuibyshev 5.43 from the 52nd and 98th Rifle Brigades. Fought in the Ukraine and Poland. With 3rd Guards Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 128th Mountain Rifle Division—originally formed 1920s as 1st Turkestanskaya RD. Possibly with Eleventh Army in June 1941. Fought near Leningrad and at Kattowitz. With 21st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 129th Rifle Division—established at Moscow from 2nd Moscow Militia Division Jun 1941. Fought at Smolensk, Yartsevo, and Vyazma; wiped out at Vyazma Oct 1941. Recreated at Moscow Oct 1941. Fought in southern Russia, at Orel, and in Poland and the Baltic regions. With Third Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 130th Rifle Division—established at Romny 8.39 and wiped out at Vyazma 10.41. Reactivated at Moscow on basis of 3rd Moscow Communist Rifle Division 22.1.42 and became 53rd Guards Rifle Division 12.42. Activated again from 152nd, 156th, and 159th Rifle Brigades at Matveyev Kurgan 1.43, fought at Taganrog, Brest, and Gumbinnen. With 28th Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45.

131–140[edit]

141–150[edit]

151–160[edit]

  • 151st Rifle Division—6000 чел. (начало сборов 1.06.41, Kharkov MD); established at Udshary prior to Jun 1941. Wiped out at Kiev Sep 1941. Recreated at Udshary Oct 1941. Served on Turkish frontier. Fought at Zhmerinka and Stanislav, in the Carpathians and Hungary, and at Budapest. With 26th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded with the Southern Group of Forces in the summer of 1945.[49]
  • 152nd Rifle Division—established at Chita prior to 1939. Fought at Smolensk and Yartsevo; wiped out at Vyazma Oct 1941. Recreated in north Urals Jan 1942 (Goff, 1998, says reformed from 430th RD about 22 January 1942). Fought in Karelia, at Dnipropetrovsk, in East Prussia, and at Berlin. With 28th Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 153rd Rifle Division—became 3rd Guards Rifle Division September 1941; Re-activated early 1942 as the 153rd Rifle Division; 31st Dec 1942 renamed 57th Guards Rifle Division; with 50th Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945. 1957 renamed 57th Guards Motorized Rifle Division; attached to the Eighth Guards Army (1945–1990s).
  • 154th Rifle Division—established at Ulyanovsk prior to Jun 1941. Fought in Bryansk Pocket and Kaluga. Became 47th Guards Rifle Division in Oct 1942. Recreated at Rzhev May 1943. With 2nd Guards Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 155th Rifle Division—established at Opotschka in 1939. Fought in the Winter War and wiped out at Bryansk 10.41. Recreated at Moscow from 4th Moscow Home Guard Rifle Division 1.42, fought at Kalinin, Kursk, in the Carpathians, and at Budapest. With 27th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded with the Southern Group of Forces in the summer of 1945.[49]
  • 156th Rifle Division—established at Staniza-Petrovska prior to Jun 1941. With 9th Rifle Corps of Odessa Military District in June 1941 and fought in Crimea. Disbanded Aug 1942. Recreated from 26th and 162nd Rifle Brigades at Kalinin Apr 1943. With 4th Shock Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945.
  • 157th Rifle Division—established at Novocherkassk in 1939. Fought in the Crimea and Stalingrad, became the 76th Guards Rifle Division in March 1943. Recreated from 148th Rifle Brigade at Kalinin March 1943, fought at Chernigov and Insterburg. With 5th Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 158th Rifle Division—established at Yeysk (Ейск) in 1940. Wiped out at Smolensk Aug 1941. Recreated at Moscow from 5th Moscow Home Guard Rifle Division Jan 1942. Fought at Kalinin and Vitebsk. With 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 159th Rifle Division—established at Belaya Tserkov 6.40, with 6th Rifle Corps, 6th Army of the Soviet Southwestern Front 22.6.41. Wiped out at Kiev 9.41 and recreated in the Urals the same month. Fought at Stalingrad and became the 61st Guards Rifle Division 1.43. Created again at Rzhev from the 20th Rifle and 49th Ski Brigades 6.43, fought at Vitebsk and Insterburg. With 5th Army of the RVGK 5.45. See also fr:159e division de fusiliers.
  • 160th Rifle Division—established at Gorki from the 6th Moscow People's Militia Rifle Division Jun 1941. Second formation with same number while first still existed, formed Nov 1941. Fought at Kharkiv and Stalingrad. Became the 89th Guards Rifle Division Apr 1943. Created for third time at Gydnia Mar 1945. With 70th Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13] Disbanded in 1955 in the Transcaucasus Military District by being renumbered 4th Rifle Division.

161–170[edit]

  • 161st Rifle Division – formed 1940, became 4th Guards Rifle Division on September 18, 1941. Reformed for the second time in April (or June) 1942 from 13th Separate Rifle Brigade in Moscow MD.[56] Fought at Kursk, in the Carpathians, and in Poland. With 1st Guards Army of the 4th Ukrainian Front May 1945. 24th Mechanised Division by 1955, 99th Motor Rifle Division 1957, then became 161st Motor Rifle Division in 1957. After 1990 became Ukrainian 161st Mechanised Brigade.
  • 162nd Rifle Division—5600 чел. (начало сборов 1.06.41, Kharkov MD) —established at Artemovsk prior to Jun 1941. Wiped out at Vyazma Oct 1941. Recreated at Verchniy Ufalev Jan 1942. Inactivated Jul 1942. Recreated at Tashkent from the Central Asia NKVD Division Oct 1942. Fought near Baranov, in Poland, and in the Berlin Operation. With 70th Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 163rd Rifle Division—established at Vishny Volochev 7.30, was motorized by 9.39, later reverted to leg infantry. Fought at Suomussalmi (wiped out), Pskov, Demyansk, Kiev, Iasi, Budapest, and Vienna. With 27th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 164th Rifle Division—established at Orsha Nov 1939. Wiped out at Vyazma Oct 1941. Recreated at Lenino Oct 1943; with 4th Shock Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945. Became 16th Rifle Brigade 1946, became 73rd Mechanized Division October 1953,[57] 121st Motor Rifle Division 1957.[58]
  • 165th Rifle Division—established at Ordzhonikidze prior to Jun 1941. Wiped out Dec 1941. Recreated at Kurgan Dec 1941. Fought at Gydnia in 1945. With 70th Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 166th Rifle Division—established at Tomsk prior to Jun 1941. Wiped out Vyazma Oct 1941. Recreated Cherbarkul Jan 1942. Fought at Kursk and in Kurland. With 6th Guards Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945.
  • 167th Rifle Division—established at Tula prior to 6.41 and wiped out at Rogachev 8.41. Recreated at Ssucho Lug 2.42, fought near Bryansk, at Kursk, in the Carpathians, and in Hungary. With 1st Guards Army of the 4th Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 168th Rifle Division—established at Sortovala prior to 12.39, fought in Winter War. With 7th Army (Soviet Union) on 22 June 1941, fought near Leningrad and Stalingrad. With 22nd Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 169th Rifle Division—established at Vinnitsa prior to 1940. Fought at Kiev, Uman, Stalingrad, Orel, and in East Prussia. With 3rd Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 170th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)—established at Sterlitamak prior to Feb 1942. Recreated; fought at Demyansk, Staraya Russa, Kursk, Rechitsa, and in East Prussia and Kurland. With 48th Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945.

171–180[edit]

  • 171st Rifle Division—established at Kamensk September 1939. Wiped out at Kiev in September 1941. Fought in battle for the Reichstag building in Berlin, Apr 1945.
  • 172nd Rifle Division—established at Simferopol prior to 6.41 and wiped at Mogilev 7.41. Recreated from 3rd Crimean Rifle Division in 1941. Fought and destroyed at Sevastopol 7.42. Created again at Moscow 10.42, fought at Pavlograd, Kursk, and Kielce. With 13th Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Stayed with the 13th Army postwar in the Kiev Military District and became the 172nd MRD in 1965. Disbanded by becoming a weapons and equipment storage base in 1990 just before the collapse of the Soviet Union.
  • 173rd Rifle Division—established at Gjassin in 1940 and wiped out at Uman August 1941. Recreated at Moscow from the 21st People's Militia Rifle Division 9.41. Fought at Tula and Stalingrad, became the 77th Guards Rifle Division 1.3.43. Created again at Staritsa from the 150th Rifle Brigade. Fought at Chernigov, Lenino, and Minsk. With 31st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 174th Rifle Division—established at Kurgan 8.40 and became 20th Guards Rifle Division 17.3.42. Created again at Starobelsk from the 130th Motorized Rifle Brigade in April 1942 and became 46th Guards Rifle Division 10.42. Recreated at Kaluga from the 28th Rifle Brigade 4.43, fought at Kursk, and in Belorussia and East Prussia. With 31st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 175th Rifle Division—established at Prokladny prior to 6.41, wiped out at Kiev 9.41. Recreated at Tyumen 3.42, fought near Stalingrad and inactivated there 9.42. Recreated again at Sverdlovsk after 10.42, fought at Demyansk and in Belorussia. With 47th Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 176th Rifle Division—established at Krivoy Rog in April 1941, with 9th Army in June 1941. Fought at Novorossiysk and became 129th Guards Rifle Division 10.43. Created again at Maselkaya from the 65th and 80th Naval Rifle Brigades 3.44. With 31st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 177th Rifle Division—established at Leningrad prior to June 1941. Fought in northern areas of front. With 23rd Army of the Leningrad Front) May 1945.
  • 178th Rifle Division—established at Omsk prior to Jun 1941. With 23rd Army of the Leningrad Front) May 1945.
  • 179th Rifle Division— 'Vitebsk.' Established at Vilnius in 1940. With 29th Rifle Corps of Eleventh Army on June 22, 1941. Fought at Kalinin, Gomel, and Vitebsk; with 4th Shock Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945.
  • 180th Rifle Division—formed 1940 in the Baltic Special MD; became 28th Guards Rifle Division 3 May 1942, recreated at Tscherepowez 6.42, fought at Kiev, Targul Frumos, and Budapest. With 53rd Army of the 2nd Ukrainian Front in May 1945. Briefly 14th Rifle Division in the mid-1950s, assigned directly to Odessa Military District headquarters.[59] Then became 88th Motor Rifle Division 1957, but became 180th 'Киевская краснознаменная, орденов Суворова, Кутузова' Motor Rifle Division in 1965 and remained under that title until the 1990s, based at Belgorod-Dnestrovsky. After 1992 became Ukrainian 27th Mechanised Brigade.

181–190[edit]

191–200[edit]

201–210[edit]

211–220[edit]

  • 211th Rifle Division—established at Zagorsk prior to 6.41 and wiped out at Vyazma 10.41. Recreated at Novossil 1.42 (Goff, 1998, says reformed from 429th RD about 16 Dec 1941), fought at Voronezh, Kursk, and Chenigov. With 1st Guards Army of the 4th Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 212th Rifle Division—established at Cherkassy 6.41. In a report of 13 July 1941, the temporary commander of 15th Mechanised Corps said the division, 'with an almost full complement of Red Army soldiers, completely lacked vehicles for transporting personnel and could not even secure auto-transport for supply of ammunition, foodstuffs, and fuel and lubricants and also for the transportation of weapons.'[61] Fought at Moscow, Kharkov, and Stalingrad. Inactivated at Stalingrad 11.42. Recreated at Ssuschinitschi from the 4th and 125th Rifle Brigades 6.43, fought at Kursk. With 61st Army of the 1st Belorussian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 213th Rifle Division—established at Vinnitsa 3.41 and wiped out at Uman 8.41. Recreated at Katta Kurgan 1.42, fought at Kursk, Targul Frumos, and in the Vistula-Oder Operation. With 52nd Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.
  • 214th Rifle Division—6,000 establishment (commenced mobilisation at Luhansk on the 10 June 1941, Kharkov MD); established at Vorishilovgrad 4.41 and wiped out at Vyazma 10.41. Recreated at Ufa 1.42, fought at Stalingrad, Voronezh, Kremenchug, Kirovograd, and the Puławy Bridgehead. With 52nd Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 215th Rifle Division—established at Rovno 4.41 and wiped out at Kiev 9.41. Recreated at Nelidovo 4.42, fought on the Terek River, and at Smolensk and Vilnius. With 5th Army of the RVGK 5.45. Moved to the Far East and fought in the Soviet invasion of Manchuria. Eventually became 124th MRD in 1965 and, later, the 199th MRD in 1989.
  • 216th Rifle Division—established at Staro Konstantinov in May 1941. Fought at Kharkiv and in Karelia, Crimea, and Kurland. With 50th Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945. 216 RD in Fourth Army (Soviet Union) until 1955. 1955 redesigned 34th Rifle Division, but then disbanded 7 July 1956.[30]
  • 217th Rifle Division—established at Voronezh Jun 1941. Fought at Yelnaya and wiped out in Bryansk Pocket. Recreated Pavlograd Oct 1941. Fought at Kaluga, near Kursk, and in Belorussia, East Prussia, and Kurland. With 48th Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 218th Rifle Division—established at Gusyatin prior to 6.41, inactivated 7.42. Recreated at Kiev 11.43, fought at Zhitomir. With 6th Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 219th Rifle Division—established as motor rifle division at Kharkiv 4.41 and wiped out at Kiev 9.41. Recreated as rifle division at Kirssanov 5.42, fought near Stalingrad. With 22nd Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 220th Rifle Division—established at Vyazma in 1941. Arrived from Orel Military District to join 19th Army, seemingly detached from 23rd Mechanised Corps in early July 1941. A report by 19th Army Chief of Staff, Major General Rubtsov, on 24 July 1941 said that the division was 'hardly formed as a motorised rifle division and had no tanks and vehicles and was understrength in artillery.'[62] Fought at Yelnaya, Vyazma, Rzhev, Grodno, and Minsk. With 31st Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]

221–230[edit]

231–240[edit]

241–250[edit]

251–260[edit]

  • 251st Rifle Division—established at Kolomna Jul 1941. Fought at Smolensk, Moscow, Iasi, Targul Frumos, and in the Belorussian Operation and Kurland. With Soviet Second Guards Army of the 3rd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 252nd Rifle Division—established at Serpukhov 7.41 and wiped out at Belyi 5.42. Recreated at Molotov 8.42, fought at Stalingrad, Kursk, Iasi, and Pressburg. With Seventh Guards Army of the 2nd Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 253rd Rifle Division—established at Volochansk 7.41, fought at Rostov and Kharkiv before being wiped out at Izyum 5.42. Recreated at Chapyevsk 9.42, fought on the Dnieper River and Kalinkovichi. With 3rd Guards Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Central Group of Forces.[19]
  • 254th Rifle Division—established at Tula 7.41, fought at Staraya Russa, Demyansk, Kursk, Korsun, Iasi, and Czestochowa. With 52nd Army of the 1st Ukrainian Front 5.45.
  • 255th Rifle Division—established at Pavlograd 8.41, fought in Uman Pocket, inactivated 7.42. Recreated ?, with 15th Army of the Far Eastern Front 5.45.
  • 256th Rifle Division—established ?, fought at Smolensk, Moscow, and Kursk. With 22nd Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 257th Rifle Division—established at Tula Jul 1941. Fought at Kerch and Velikiye Luki. Became 91st Guards Rifle Division Apr 1943. Recreated at Krimskaya from 9th Rifle, 60th Rifle, and 62nd Naval Rifle Brigades Jun 1943. With 4th Shock Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945.
  • 258th Rifle Division—established at Orel 7.41, fought at Bryansk, Roslavl, and Tula. Became the 12th Guards Rifle Division 1.42. Recreated; with the 25th Army of the independent coastal group in the Far East 5.45.
  • 259th Rifle Division—established at Serpukhov 7.41, fought at Leningrad and in the Ukraine. With 37th Army in Bulgaria 5.45.
  • 260th Rifle Division—established at Kalinin 7.41, fought at Bryansk and destroyed there 10.41. Recreated at Volokolamsk after 10.41. Fought at Moscow, Stalingrad, and in Belorussia and Poland. With 47th Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.

261–270[edit]

  • 261st Rifle Division—established at Berdyansk 7.41, inactivated 10.42, subsequently recreated and with 45th Army of the Transcaucasus Front 5.45. After the war became 127th MRD and then, after the fall of the Soviet Union, the Russian 102nd Military Base in independent Armenia.
  • 262nd Rifle Division—established at Vladimir 7.41, fought at Demidov, Tilsit, and in Manchuria. With 39th Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 263rd Rifle Division—established at Vologda Nov 1941. Fought near Leningrad and in the Ukraine and Crimea. With 43rd Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 264th Rifle Division—established at Poltava 7.41 and wiped out at Kiev 9.41. Recreated Svyatogorsk 5.42, became the 48th Guards Rifle Division 10.42. Recreated; with the 35th Army of the independent coastal group in the Far East 5.45.
  • 265th Rifle Division—established at Leningrad, likely in 1941. Fought at Vyborg and Tortolovo. With 3rd Shock Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 266th Rifle Division—established at Kaluga as a motor rifle division Jul 1941. Wiped out at Kiev Sep 1941. Recreated at Stalingrad Jan 1942. Fought at Kharkiv May 1942. Merged with 417th Rifle Division May 1942. Recreated at Kuibyshev Aug 1942. Fought at Stalingrad, in the Ukraine, in the Lvov-Sandomir and Iasi-Kishinev operations, and at Berlin. With 5th Shock Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 267th Rifle Division—established at Stary Oskol in Aug 1941. Wiped out at Volchov Jun 1942. Recreated at Serpukhov Sep 1942. Fought in the Ukraine, Crimea, and vicinity Riga. With 51st Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945. Disbanded while stationed at Tula and Plavsk in the Moscow Military District in February–April 1946, as part of 1st Guards Rifle Corps, the divisional headquarters staff joining the arriving 75th Guards Rifle Division.
  • 268th Rifle Division—established at Mozyr 7.41, fought at Leningrad and Mga. With 22nd Army of the RVGK 5.45.
  • 269th Rifle Division—established at Kolomna Jul 1941. Fought at Moscow, Orel, Gomel, Rogachev, Białystok, and Ostrołenka. With 3rd Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 270th Rifle Division—established at Melitopol Jul 1941. Wiped out at Izyum May 1942. Recreated Voronezh Oct 1942. Fought at Stalingrad, Kharkiv, and Kursk; with 4th Shock Army of the Kurland Group (Leningrad Front) May 1945. Eventually became 270th Motor Rifle Division and today serves with the Russian Ground Forces in the Far East.

271–280[edit]

281–290[edit]

291–300[edit]

301–310[edit]

311–320[edit]

321–330[edit]

331–340[edit]

341–350[edit]

351–360[edit]

361–370[edit]

  • 361st Rifle Division—established at Ufa 10.41, fought at Torzhok, became the 21st Guards Rifle Division 3.42. Recreated ?, with 15th Army of the Far Eastern Front 5.45, was in Manchuria 8.45.
  • 362nd Rifle Division—established at Archangelsk Sep 1941. Fought at Moscow and Rzhev. Became 22nd Guards Rifle Division Mar 1942. Recreated ?; with 33rd Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 363rd Rifle Division—September 12, 1941 in the city of Kamyshlov of the Sverdlovsk region the 363rd Rifle Division under the command of Colonel K. Sviridov was formed. First, the division was sent to Tutaev in Yaroslavl Oblast to prevent possible circumvention of Moscow by German troops, and later, she participated in the battles of Moscow and Rzhev. For showing courage and fortitude, by Order of the People's Commissar of Defense on March 17, 1942 the division was awarded the honorary title of "Guards" and converted into the 22nd Guards Rifle Division. In July 1942, the division was moved to the Leningrad Front, where it was fighting in the Demianskiy bridgehead until November 1942. After reforming in camps southeast of the town Morshansk and (Tambov Region) as the 2nd Guards Mechanized Corps, the next destination is the Stalingrad area, where the body in the 2nd Guards Army reflected shock stein (Operation "Vintergevitter ") until February 1943. Recreated; with the 35th Army of the independent coastal group in the Far East 5.45.
  • 364th Rifle Division—established at Omsk Sep 1941. Fought vicinity Leningrad and at the Puławy Bridgehead. With 3rd Shock Army of the 1st Belorussian Front May 1945.
  • 365th Rifle Division—established at Sverdlovsk 10.41, fought at Moscow and wiped out at Rzhev 2.42. Recreated; with the 1st Red Banner Army of the independent coastal group in the Far East 5.45.
  • 366th Rifle Division—established at Tomsk 9.41, fought in far north, became the 19th Guards Rifle Division 17.3.42. Recreated, with the 25th Army of the independent coastal group in the Far East 5.45.
  • 367th Rifle Division—established at Shandansk 8.41, fought in northern Finland and Norway. With 14th Army in northern Norway 5.45.
  • 368th Rifle Division—established in Siberia 9.41, served on Finnish front and in the Petsamo-Kirkenes Operation; with the Belarussian Military District 5.45.
  • 369th Rifle Division—established at Kurgan Sep 1941. Fought at Kursk, in Belorussian Operation, and at Danzig. With 70th Army of the 2nd Belorussian Front May 1945. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]
  • 370th Rifle Division—established at Tomsk 9.41, fought at Demyansk, Staraya Russa, the Puławy Bridgehead, and Berlin. With 69th Army of the 1st Belorussian Front 5.45. Disbanded in the summer of 1945 with the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany.[13]

371–380[edit]

381–390[edit]

391–400[edit]

401–420[edit]

421–440[edit]

441–477[edit]

Guards Rifle Divisions[edit]

1 – 10 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

11 – 20 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

21 – 30 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

31 – 40 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

41 – 50 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

51 – 60 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

61 – 70 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

71 – 80 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

81 – 90 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

91 – 100 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

101 – 110 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

111 – 120 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

121 – 129 Guards Rifle Division[edit]

Motor Rifle Divisions[edit]

People's Militia[edit]

Leningrad People's Militia[edit]

People's Militia divisions, listed in the order of creation, were hastily created in mid-1941 as the German advance neared Leningrad. In Russian, they were designated дивизия народного ополчения – Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division – or гвардейская дивизия народного ополчения – Guards Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division. On 23 September 1941 all the divisions of the Leningrad Narodnoe Opolcheniye Army divisions were used to form Red Army units mostly within the Leningrad Front.

  • 1st (Kirov) People's Militia Division, named for the Kirovsky District (Кировский район) (commander Kombrig V.A. Malinnikov) By 15 August, this division had joined the retreating 70th and 237th Rifle Divisions and engaged in the fighting on approaches to Novgorod. On the 3 September its 3rd regiment was transferred to the command of the 291st Rifle Division, and replaced by the 76th Latvian Separate Rifle regiment on the 14 September.
  • 2nd (Moscow) People's Militia Division named for the Moskovsky District (commander (to July, Colonel N.S. Ugrumov)
  • 3rd (Frunze) Division of People's Militia named for the Frunzensky District (Фрунзенский район) (commander (Colonel А.P. Netreba, from 16 August Z.N. Alekseyev) which from September was receiving volunteers from the Altai and Siberia.
  • 1st Guards Division of People's Militia (18 July 1941) (commander Colonel I.M. Frolov) (deployed next to the 237th Rifle Division) formed in the Kuybishev District[2]
  • 2nd Guards People's Militia Division (18 July 1941) (commander Colonel Sholev, later Colonel V.A. Trubachev) formed in the Sverdlovsk District. Fought with 42nd Army. Redesignated as 85th Rifle Division in Sept 1941.
  • 4th (Dzerzhinsky) Light Division of Narodnoe Opolcheniye (19 July 1941) named for the Dzerzhinsky District (Дзержинский район) (commander Colonel P.I Radigin) (1st regiment detached on 22 July to the 191st Rifle Division in Narva. This was a “light” division initially formed in the Krasnogvardeysky District, with only 4,257 personnel, but almost entirely motorised, and admitting only volunteers with prior combat experience. The division was allowed a period of extended combat training.
  • 3rd Guards People's Militia Division (24 July 1941) (commander Colonel V.P. Kotelnikov) which later fought with the 402nd Red Banner rifle regiment (commander Colonel Ya.S. Yermakov) of the 168th Rifle Division (commander Colonel A.L. Bondarev) formed in the Petrograd District. Division fought with 42nd Army. Redesignated as 44th Rifle Division in Sept 1941.
  • 4th Guards Division of Narodnoe Opolcheniye (27 July 1941) formed in the Kalinin District was never fully formed and on the 13 August transferred to Army reserve, its personnel used to complete units of other divisions. However, its three rifle regiments continued to participate in combat under command of other divisions, and the staff of the division was retained, and used to conduct induction training and formation, as well as command of replacement militia battalions.
  • 5th (Kuybishevskaya) Division of Narodnoe Opolcheniye (1 September 1941) (commander Colonel F.P. Utkin) formed early September 1941 from the former 4th division and on the 10 September moved to Pulkovo.
  • 6th Division of Narodnoe Opolcheniye – formed 1 September 1941
  • 7th Division of Narodnoe Opolcheniye (commander Colonel I.S. Kuznetsov) raised on 17 September 1941 it was re-designated on the 30 September as the 56th Rifle Division.

Moscow People's Militia[edit]

Although 25 Narodnoe Opolcheniye divisions were intended for formation, only 16 were formed due to demand for workers in building the fortifications for the defence of Moscow. By the 7 July 1941 140,000 volunteers had been accepted into the Moscow People's Militia, and organised into 12 divisions (of establishment (shtat) 11,633) named according to the city rayons. However on 20 September 1941 they were redesignated as regular rifle divisions (numbers in brackets):

  • 1st Lenin rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division (60th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 1-я – Ленинского района)[123]
  • 2nd Stalin rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division (2nd Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 2-я – Сталинского района)
  • 4th Kuybishev rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division (110th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 4- я – Куйбышевского района)
  • 5th Frunze rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division (113th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 5-я – Фрунзенского района)
  • 6th Dzerzhinsky rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye Division (Russian: 6-я – Дзержинского района)
  • 7th Bauman rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (29th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 7-я – Бауманского района)
  • 8th Krasnpreensky rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (became 8th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 8-я – Краснопресненского района)
  • 9th Kirov rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (became 139th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 9-я – Кировского района)
  • 13th Rostock rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (became 140th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 13-я – Ростокинского района)
  • 17th Moskvorets rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (became 17th Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 17- я – Москворецкого района)
  • 18th Leningrad rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (became 18th Rifle Division (III Formation)) then 11th Guards Rifle Division (Russian: Ленинградского района)
  • 21st Kiev rayon Narodnoe Opolcheniye division (became 173rd Rifle Division (2)) (Russian: 21-я – Киевского района)

These divisions were allocated to the Mozhaisk Defence Line Front (commander General P.A. Artemyev) which consisted of the 32nd Army (General N.K. Klykov) in Vyazma, 33rd Army (Kombrig D.P. Onuprienko) in Spas-Demyansk and 34th Army (General N.I. Pronin), and also included five NKVD divisions (one each in the 32nd and 34th Armies, and three in the 33rd Army).

In October 1941 four more divisions were formed

Other People's Militia divisions[edit]

  • A Rostov-on-Don Cavalry Division of narodnoe opolcheniye later became the 116th Cavalry Division (116-я кавалерийская дивизия), and later still the 12th Guards Cavalry Division. It incorporated a separate opolcheniye rife regiment raised at the same time. The division initially enlisted Don Cossack population of the region.
  • The Stalingrad People's Militia corps included a cavalry and an infantry opolcheniye divisions, and a tank brigade donated and crewed by the local factory workers.
  • Although 15,000 personnel joined the Sevastopol People's Militia, these were organised into a corps of four, later three brigades.
  • Krasnodar Krai, Kirovsk Krai, Voronezh Krai, and Yaroslav Krai formed a People's Militia division each.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Seaton & Seaton 1986, p. 42.
  2. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 44.
  3. ^ a b c Crofoot & Avanzini 2004a, p. 110.
  4. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 55.
  5. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 60.
  6. ^ Crofoot & Avanzini 2004a, p. 103.
  7. ^ Crofoot & Avanzini 2004b, p. 5.
  8. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 114.
  9. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 113.
  10. ^ Crofoot & Avanzini 2005, p. 5.
  11. ^ Scott & Scott 1979, p. 12.
  12. ^ Glantz 2005a, p. 717n5.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar Feskov et al 2013, pp. 380–381.
  14. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 478.
  15. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 566.
  16. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 150.
  17. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 450.
  18. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 565.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av Feskov et al 2013, p. 413.
  20. ^ a b Feskov et al 2013, p. 508.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Feskov et al 2013, p. 408.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i Feskov et al 2013, p. 151.
  23. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 111.
  24. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 468.
  25. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 497.
  26. ^ Crofoot & Avanzini 2004b, p. 54.
  27. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 397.
  28. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 117.
  29. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 581.
  30. ^ a b Feskov et al 2013, p. 152.
  31. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 118.
  32. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 576.
  33. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 120.
  34. ^ Drig, Yevgeny (20 March 2007). "36 мотострелковая Забайкальская ордена Ленина дивизия" [36th Motor Rifle Transbaikal Order of Lenin Division]. mechcorps.rkka.ru (in Russian). Archived from the original on 2012-04-06. Retrieved 28 August 2016. 
  35. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 566–567.
  36. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 123.
  37. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 489.
  38. ^ Dvoinykh, Kariaeva, Stegantsev, eds. 1993, p. 127.
  39. ^ a b c d Feskov et al 2013, p. 146.
  40. ^ & # entry43861 47 Mountain Division
  41. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 525.
  42. ^ Feskov et al 2004, p.73.
  43. ^ Feskov et al 2004, p.105.
  44. ^ 63rd Infantry Division
  45. ^ http://www.rkka.ru/handbook/reg/69md41.htm, accessed July 2011
  46. ^ Awarded with the Order of Lenin after the Winter War. On the combat history of the division see, for example, Soviet Military Encyclopaedia, v.4, pp.431–431.
  47. ^ history of 77 Infantry Division and 77-Rifle Division
  48. ^ Bonn, 2005, says that 82nd Motorised Rifle Division was originally formed in Perm region as 82nd Self-Propelled Gun Division, converted to 82 MRD 1941. Bonn, Slaughterhouse, Aberjona Press, 2005, p.350
  49. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Feskov et al 2013, p. 422.
  50. ^ Kolomiets (2001), p. 58
  51. ^ Боевой путь 108-Бобруйской ордена Ленина краснознаменной дивизии
  52. ^ S.N.Zhilin and others “Under the Guard banner ". Arkhangelsk/Vologda. 1980
  53. ^ Feskov et al 2013, p. 429.
  54. ^ a b Журнал Санкт-Петербургский университет ISSN 1681-1941 / № 1–2 (3657–3658), 19 January 2004
  55. ^ Data of the Red Army in the Winter War, OOB
  56. ^ M.K.Smolnyy “7,000 kilometers in battles and campaigns". Military Publishing, 1982.
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  104. ^ "75-я стрелковая дивизия" [75th Rifle Division]. rkka.ru (in Russian). Retrieved 16 November 2016. 
  105. ^ Poirier and Conner show the 21st GRD as being formed from the 361st RD in Mar 1942
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  110. ^ Feskov et al 2004, 75.
  111. ^ Feskov et al., 2004, Table 2.4, p.51/52
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  122. ^ Keith E. Bonn (ed.), Slaughterhouse: The Handbook of the Eastern Front, Aberjona Press, Bedford, PA, 2005, p.376
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References[edit]