List of Staten Island Railway stations

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2009 Map of the Staten Island Railway, which includes the now-closed Nassau, Atlantic, and Richmond County Bank Ballpark stations, as well as the now-opened Arthur Kill station.

The Staten Island Railway (formerly known as the Staten Island Rapid Transit) is a rapid transit system on Staten Island, New York. Its operator has been the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of New York since 1971, whereas prior to that year it was owned by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

Main Line[edit]

This list contains all stations currently open on the Staten Island Railway (SIR). All active SIR stations are located on the Main Line, which spans from Tottenville to the St. George Ferry Terminal. Stations tend to be built either above ground level on embankments or are open-cut stations built below ground level, but open to the sky.

Handicapped/disabled access Station is accessible by wheelchair[1]
Name Opened Closed Handicapped/disabled access Other names Connections/Notes
Annadale May 14, 1860
1939
present
Arthur Kill January 21, 2017 present Handicapped/disabled access
Bay Terrace Early 1900s present Whitlock
Clifton April 23, 1860 present Vanderbilt's Landing Only three cars can platform at the St. George-bound platform. This station was the original northern terminal of the line.
Dongan Hills April 23, 1860 present Handicapped/disabled access Garretson's
Eltingville April 23, 1860 present Bus to Eltingville Transit Center and Staten Island Mall
Great Kills April 23, 1860 present Handicapped/disabled access Gifford's
Grant City April 23, 1860 present
Grasmere c. 1886 present S53 bus to Bay Ridge, Brooklyn
Huguenot June 2, 1860 present Bloomingview, then Huguenot Park
Jefferson Avenue 1937–1938 present
New Dorp April 23, 1860 present
Oakwood Heights April 23, 1860 present Richmond, then Court House, then Oakwood
Old Town 1937–1938 present Old Town Road
Pleasant Plains June 2, 1860 present
Prince's Bay June 2, 1860 present Lemon Creek
Princes Bay
Richmond Valley June 2, 1860 present Only three cars can platform at this station. The former West Shore Line, which was used for freight, diverged south of this station.
St. George March 7, 1886 present Handicapped/disabled access Staten Island Ferry
Stapleton July 31, 1884
1936
present
Tompkinsville July 31, 1884 present
Tottenville June 2, 1860 present Handicapped/disabled access Passengers used to transfer here for the ferry to Perth Amboy.

Disused and former stations[edit]

The majority of former stations are located on the North Shore Branch and South Beach Branch, which were closed to passenger service at midnight on Tuesday, March 31, 1953. A small western portion of the North Shore Branch that is disconnected to the Main Line is used for freight service, and a smaller eastern portion of the same branch provided seasonal service to the RCB Ballpark (where the Staten Island Yankees play) passenger station from 2001 to 2009. Restoration is being discussed along this mostly abandoned 6.1-mile (9.8 km) line as part of the Staten Island light rail plan.[2] The South Shore Branch was abandoned and demolished except for a remaining stanchion on St. John's Avenue and the Robin Road Trestle.[3][4] This 4.1-mile (6.6 km) line diverged from the Main Line south of the Clifton station and lay to the east of the Main Line.

Name Line Opened Closed Distance from St. George Notes
Arlington North Shore Branch 1889–1890 March 31, 1953 5.2 miles (8.4 km)
Arrochar South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.2 miles (5.1 km)
Atlantic Main Line 1909-1911 January 21, 2017 26.1 miles (42.0 km)
Bachmann South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 1937 2.0 miles (3.2 km)
Belair Road South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.5 miles (4.0 km)
Cedar Avenue South Beach Branch 1934 March 31, 1953 3.5 miles (5.6 km)
Clinton Avenue North Shore Branch Between Sailor's Snug Harbor and New Brighton stations.
Elm Park North Shore Branch February 23, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.9 miles (6.3 km)
Fort Wadsworth South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.7 miles (4.3 km)
Harbor Road North Shore Branch 1935–1937 March 31, 1953 4.9 miles (7.9 km)
Lake Avenue North Shore Branch 1937 March 31, 1953 4.3 miles (6.9 km)
Livingston North Shore Branch February 23, 1886 March 31, 1953 1.8 miles (2.9 km)
Mariners Harbor North Shore Branch Summer 1886 March 31, 1953 4.6 miles (7.4 km)
Mount Loretto Orphanage Mount Loretto Branch[5][6] 1885 1950 This station was used for special excursions.
Nassau Main Line after 1922 January 21, 2017 25.7 miles (41.4 km) Served the Nassau Smelting Company.
New Brighton North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 0.7 miles (1.1 km)
Ocean Park Main Line
Port Ivory North Shore Branch 1906 1948 6.1 miles (9.8 km) Served the employees of Procter & Gamble's factory.
Port Richmond North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.0 miles (4.8 km)
Richmond County Bank Ballpark North Shore Branch June 24, 2001 June 18, 2010 150 yards (140 m)
Rosebank South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.1 miles (3.4 km)
Sailors' Snug Harbor North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 1.2 miles (1.9 km)
South Beach South Beach Branch 1890 March 31, 1953 3.9 miles (6.3 km)
Tower Hill North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.4 miles (5.5 km)
Wentworth Avenue South Beach Branch 1925 March 31, 1953 4.1 miles (6.6 km) This likely was the shortest rapid transit station in the world.
West Brighton North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.4 miles (3.9 km)
Woods of Arden Main Line 1886 1894–1895 14.6 miles (23.5 km)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MTA Guide to Accessible Transit: Accessible Stations in the MTA Network". New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved November 21, 2012. 
  2. ^ Yates, Maura; Helsel, Phil (July 12, 2008). "Reality check for Staten Island's rail plans". Retrieved February 24, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Gary Owen's S.I.R.T. South Beach Line Page". Retrieved March 7, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Gary Owen's S.I.R.T. South Beach Line Page". p. 2. Retrieved March 7, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Gary Owen's SIRT Page". gretschviking.net. 
  6. ^ Staten Island Rapid Transit: The Essential History, by Irvin Leigh & Paul Matus (The Third Rail Online) Archived August 26, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]