List of Suzuki engines

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This is a list of automobile engines developed and sold by the Suzuki Motor Corporation. Suzuki is unusual in never having made a pushrod automobile engine, and in having depended on two-strokes for longer than most. Their first four-stroke engine was the SOHC F8A, which appeared in 1977. Suzuki continued to offer a two-stroke engine in an automotive application for a considerably longer time than any other Japanese manufacturer.

Straight twins[edit]

Suzulight SF Series[edit]

360.88 cc (22.022 cu in) air-cooled 2-stroke, 59 mm × 66 mm (2.32 in × 2.60 in) bore × stroke (downsleeved copy of Lloyd LP400 engine)

FB Series[edit]

  • 1961–1972 – Suzuki FB engine – air-cooled 359 cc
  • 1963–1969 – Suzuki FE/FE2 engine – air-cooled 359 cc, FF applications
  • 1972–1976 – Suzuki L50 engine – water-cooled 359 cc
  • 1974–1976 – Suzuki L60 engine – water-cooled 446 cc (export only)

FA/FC (prototype)[edit]

360 cc (22 cu in) 2-stroke, 64 mm × 56 mm (2.52 in × 2.20 in) bore/stroke. This prototype produced 25 bhp (19 kW) at 6000 rpm. It was fitted to a rear-engined prototype (also named FC) in 1961, as part of the development work for the LC10 Fronte.

Daihatsu's AB10[edit]

E08A engine[edit]

Three cylinders[edit]

C engine — 2-stroke[edit]

  • C10 — 785 cc (47.9 cu in) 70 mm × 68 mm (2.76 in × 2.68 in)
  • C20 — 1,100 cc (67.1 cu in) – 80 PS (59 kW) prototype engine for intended Suzuki Fronte 1100

LC engine[edit]

LC10W three-cylinder engine in Fronte Coupé

1967–1977 – Suzuki LC engine – 0.36–0.48 L

FB engine[edit]

1975–1987 – FB Series – 0.54 L
Rather than being a newly developed engine, the T5 series is essentially an FB/L50 2-cylinder with a third cylinder added, its origins thus dating back to 1961.

F engine[edit]

1980–present – F engine (three-cylinder) – 0.5–0.8 L

G engine[edit]

1984–2006 – G engine (three-cylinder) 1.0 L

K engine[edit]

1994–present – K engine (three-cylinder) – 0.7–1.0 L

R engine[edit]

2011–present – 0.7 L

Four cylinders[edit]

F engine[edit]

1979–present – F engine (four-cylinder) – 0.7–1.1 L

G engine[edit]

1984–present – G engine (four-cylinder) – 1.0–1.6 L

J engine[edit]

1996–2019 – J engine (four-cylinder) – 1.8–2.4 L

K engine[edit]

1997–present – K engine (four-cylinder) – 1.0–1.5 L

M engine[edit]

1999–present – M engine– 1.3–1.8 L

E15A engine[edit]

2019–2020 – see Diesel engines section – 1.5 L

V6 engines[edit]

H engine[edit]

1994–2009 – H engine – 2.0–2.7 L

N engine[edit]

2006–2009 – N engine – 3.2–3.6 L

Diesel engines[edit]

D engine[edit]

2006–present – D engine – 1.3–2.0 L

Licensed from Fiat/FCA:

E engine[edit]

  • E08A — 0.8 L (793 cc) 2-cylinder
The E08A engine is a short-lived diesel engine engineered mostly for the Indian market. It is a small inline twin 4-stroke diesel engine with a bore × stroke of 77 mm × 85.1 mm (3.03 in × 3.35 in), giving 793 cc (48.4 cu in).[1] As a 360° parallel twin it features a Balance shaft located beside the crankshaft. This all aluminium engine is turbocharged and intercooled, has a 15:1 compression ratio and a DOHC cylinder head with 8 valves. Power output depends heavily on the application.
  • 2015–2017 Suzuki Celerio with 35 kW (47 hp) at 3500 min−1 and 125 N⋅m (92 lbf⋅ft) at 2000 min−1.
  • 2016–2020 Suzuki Super Carry (India & Philippines) with 24 kW (32 hp) at 3500 min−1 and 75 N⋅m (55 lbf⋅ft) at 2000 min−1.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • "How-to identify YOUR car, and where to find info on it". Team Swift. Retrieved April 14, 2006.[dead link]
  • "Suzuki Engines". Brisbane, Australia: Suzi Auto Services. Archived from the original on 2009-09-11.