List of Suzuki engines

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This is a list of automobile engines developed and sold by the Suzuki Motor Corporation. Suzuki is unusual in never having made a pushrod automobile engine, and in having depended on two-strokes for longer than most. Their first four-stroke engine was the SOHC F8A, which appeared in 1977. Suzuki continued to offer a two-stroke engine in an automotive application for a considerably longer time than any other Japanese manufacturer.

Straight twins[edit]

Suzulight SF Series[edit]

360.88 cc (22.022 cu in) air-cooled 2-stroke, 59 mm × 66 mm (2.32 in × 2.60 in) bore × stroke (downsleeved copy of Lloyd LP400 engine)

FB Series[edit]

  • 1961–1972 – Suzuki FB engine – air-cooled 359 cc
  • 1963–1969 – Suzuki FE/FE2 engine – air-cooled 359 cc, FF applications
  • 1972–1976 – Suzuki L50 engine – water-cooled 359 cc
  • 1974–1976 – Suzuki L60 engine – water-cooled 446 cc (export only)

FA/FC (prototype)[edit]

360 cc (22 cu in) 2-stroke, 64 mm × 56 mm (2.52 in × 2.20 in) bore/stroke. This prototype produced 25 bhp (19 kW) at 6000 rpm. It was fitted to a rear-engined prototype (also named FC) in 1961, as part of the development work for the LC10 Fronte.

Daihatsu's AB10[edit]

E08A engine[edit]

Three cylinders[edit]

C engine — 2-stroke[edit]

  • C10 — 785 cc (47.9 cu in) 70 mm × 68 mm (2.76 in × 2.68 in)
  • C20 — 1,100 cc (67.1 cu in) – 80 PS (59 kW) prototype engine for intended Suzuki Fronte 1100

LC engine[edit]

LC10W three-cylinder engine in Fronte Coupé

1967–1977 – Suzuki LC engine – 0.36–0.48 L

FB engine[edit]

1975–1987 – FB Series – 0.54 L
Rather than being a newly developed engine, the T5 series is essentially an FB/L50 2-cylinder with a third cylinder added, its origins thus dating back to 1961.

F engine[edit]

1980–present – F engine (three-cylinder) – 0.5–0.8 L

G engine[edit]

1984–2001 – G engine (three-cylinder) 1.0 L

K engine[edit]

1994–present – K engine (three-cylinder) – 0.7–1.0 L

R engine[edit]

2011–present – 0.7 L

Four cylinders[edit]

F engine[edit]

1979–present – F engine (four-cylinder) – 0.8–1.1 L

G engine[edit]

1984–present – G engine (four-cylinder) – 1.2–1.6 L

J engine[edit]

  • J18 — 1.8 L; 112.3 cu in (1,840 cc),[1] bore and stroke: 84 mm × 83 mm (3.3 in × 3.3 in), DOHC, 16-valve FI, 119 bhp (89 kW) at 6,200 rpm, 112 lb⋅ft (152 N⋅m) at 3,400 rpm
  • J20 — 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc), Aluminum engine block and cylinder head,, bore and stroke: 84 mm × 90 mm (3.3 in × 3.5 in), DOHC, 16-valve,[2] Multipoint fuel injection, 9.7:1 compression ratio, 127 hp (95 kW) at 6000 rpm, 134 lb⋅ft (182 N⋅m) at 3000 rpm, Emissions: catalytic converter, exhaust gas recirculation, EVAP, PCV
  • J20A — 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc), Coil on plug ignition, approximately 143 hp (107 kW) at 5,870 rpm (minor variations in reported power 141 to 145 hp (105 to 108 kW) depending on year and market), 189 N⋅m (139 lbf⋅ft) of torque at 3,500 rpm
  • J20B – 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc), Coil on plug ignition, VVT, 150 hp (152 PS; 112 kW) at 6200 rpm (With manual transmission, 148 hp (150 PS; 110 kW) with CVT), 190 N⋅m (140 lbf⋅ft) at 4000 rpm
  • J23 — 2.3 L (2,290 cc), Bore and stroke: 90 mm × 90 mm (3.5 in × 3.5 in), DOHC 16-valve FI, 9.3:1 compression ratio, 155 hp (116 kW) at 5400 rpm, 152 lb⋅ft (206 N⋅m) at 3000 rpm
  • J24B — 2.4 L (2,393 cc), Bore and stroke: 92 mm × 90 mm (3.6 in × 3.5 in), DOHC, 16-valve,
    • 2006– Suzuki Vitara, 166 bhp (124 kW) at 6,000 rpm, 167 lb⋅ft (226 N⋅m) at 3,800 rpm
    • 2010–2016 Suzuki Kizashi, 180 bhp (134 kW) at 6,000 rpm - 185 bhp (138 kW) at 6,500 rpm, 170 lb⋅ft (230 N⋅m) at 4,000 rpm

K engine[edit]

1997–present – K engine (four-cylinder) – 1.0–1.5 L

M engine[edit]

1999–present – M engine– 1.3–1.8 L

E15A engine[edit]

2019–2020 – see Diesel engines section – 1.5 L

V6 engines[edit]

H engine[edit]

1994–2006 – H engine – 2.0–2.7 L

N engine[edit]

2006–2009 – N engine – 3.2–3.6 L

Diesel engines[edit]

D engine[edit]

2006–present – D engine – 1.3–2.0 L

Licensed from Fiat/FCA:

E engine[edit]

  • E08A — 0.8 L (793 cc) 2-cylinder
The E08A engine was a short lived diesel engine designed by Maruti-Suzuki mostly for the Indian market. It is a small inline twin 4-stroke diesel engine with a bore × stroke of 77 mm × 85.1 mm (3.03 in × 3.35 in), giving 793 cc (48.4 cu in).[4] As a 360° parallel twin it features a Balance shaft located beside the crankshaft. This all aluminium engine is turbocharged and intercooled, has a 15:1 compression ratio and a DOHC cylinder head with 8 valves. Power output depends heavily on the application.
  • 2015–2017 Suzuki Celerio with 35 kW (47 hp) at 3500 min−1 and 125 N⋅m (92 lbf⋅ft) at 2000 min−1.
  • 2016–2020 Suzuki Super Carry (India & Philippines) with 24 kW (32 hp) at 3500 min−1 and 75 N⋅m (55 lbf⋅ft) at 2000 min−1.

References[edit]

  • "How-to identify YOUR car, and where to find info on it". Team Swift. Retrieved April 14, 2006.[dead link]
  • "Suzuki Engines". Brisbane, Australia: Suzi Auto Services. Archived from the original on 2009-09-11.
  1. ^ Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German and French). 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 551. ISBN 3-905386-02-X.
  2. ^ "J20 engine specs". media.gm. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-02-02. Retrieved 2017-01-23.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Suzuki E08A 2-Cylinder 0.8-liter Turbo Diesel Engine Debuts in India".