List of Suzuki engines

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This is a list of automobile engines created by Suzuki. Suzuki is unusual in never having made a pushrod automobile engine, having depended on two-strokes for longer than most. Their first four-stroke engine was the SOHC F8A, which appeared in 1977. By a considerable margin, Suzuki was the last Japanese manufacturer to offer a two-stroke engine in an automotive application.

Straight-twins[edit]

Suzulight SF Series — 360 cc (22.0 cu in) air-cooled 2-stroke, 59.0 x 66.0 mm bore/stroke (downsleeved copy of Lloyd LP400 engine)

FB Series — 359 cc (21.9 cu in) 2-stroke, 61.0 x 61.5 mm bore/stroke. A reed valve system was introduced with the L40 version of this engine.[1]

  • Suzuki FB engine — air-cooled
  • Suzuki FE/FE2 engine — air-cooled, FF applications
  • Suzuki L50 engine — water-cooled
  • Suzuki L60 engine — water-cooled 446 cc (27.2 cu in) 2-stroke, 68.0 x 61.5 mm bore/stroke (export only)

FC (prototype) — 360 cc (22.0 cu in) 2-stroke, 64.0 x 56.0 mm bore/stroke

This prototype produced 25 hp at 6,000 rpm. It was fitted to a rear-engined prototype (also named FC) in 1961, as part of the development work for the LC10 Fronte.

Suzuki also briefly installed Toyota's (as used by Daihatsu) 547 cc two-cylinder AB10 OHC engine in SS11 Frontes built in 1977 and 78, as an interim measure while work was progressing on their own four-stroke engine.[2]

Straight-threes[edit]

LC10W three-cylinder engine in Fronte Coupé
  • Suzuki LC engine — 2-stroke
    • LC10 — 356 cc (21.7 cu in) air-cooled (52.0 x 56.0mm)
    • LC10W/LC20 — 356 cc (21.7 cu in) water-cooled
    • LC50 — 475 cc (29.0 cu in) air-cooled (60.0 x 56.0mm)
    • T4A engine — 443 cc (27.0 cu in) 2-stroke (58.0 x 56.0mm). This was simply a bored out version of the LC10W.
Suzuki K10B in a 2010 Suzuki Alto

Inline-fours[edit]

F engine[edit]

The 970 cc F10A engine as well as 870 cc (62.0 x 72.0 mm, LJ462Q) and 1,051 cc (65.5 x 78.0 mm, LJ465Q) versions thereof are still produced in China and see use in a wide number of vehicles.

G engine[edit]

J engine[edit]

K engine[edit]

  • Suzuki K engine — 1.0–1.6 L I4
    • K10A — 996 cc (60.8 cu in) (68.0 x 68.6 mm) DOHC 16-valve, later with VVT and available with turbocharging. - The K10A has variable inlet cam timing and an 8.4:1 static compression ratio. Maximum output of the turbo version is 74 kW at 6,500 rpm and 122 Nm at 3,000 rpm. In naturally aspirated form it produces 51 kW (70 HP).[6] This engine is popular with hobbyist aircraft and hovercraft builders due to its light weight, torque and top-end power potential.
      • 1997-2000 Suzuki Wagon R Wide (naturally aspirated for the EU market).
    • K12M — 1.2 L (1,197 cc) DOHC 16-valve, 85 PS (63 kW)
    • K12A — 1.2 L DOHC 16-valve, 69 PS (51 kW)
    • K12B — 1.2 L (1,242 cc) DOHC 16-valve VVT

M engine[edit]

Inline-sixes[edit]

V6 engines[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Suzuki Service Manual: Carry L40/L41/L40V (Manual), Hamamatsu, Japan: Suzuki Motor Co. Ltd., p. 26 
  2. ^ Ozeki, Kazuo (2007). Suzuki Story: Small Cars, Big Ambitions. Tokyo: Miki Press. pp. 66–67. ISBN 978-4-89522-503-8. 
  3. ^ a b "Suzuki Global. Splash Specifications.". Retrieved 2014-05-26. 
  4. ^ "軽自動車用の4気筒エンジン" [Kei four-cylinder engines]. a-design-for-life (in Japanese). 2014-09-27. Retrieved 2015-06-04. 
  5. ^ . media.gm http://archives.media.gm.com/division/2003_prodinfo/03_powertrain/03_truck_engine/index.html. Retrieved 16 April 2014.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German/French) 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 550. ISBN 3-905386-02-X. 
  7. ^ "K14B发动机: 图片展示" [K14B engine: photo gallery] (in Chinese). China Chang'an Automobile Group. Retrieved 2011-05-26.