List of Trump administration dismissals and resignations

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Many political appointees of Donald Trump, the 45th President of the United States, resigned or were dismissed. The record-setting turnover rate in the first year of the Trump Administration has been noted in various publications.[1][2][3] Several Trump appointees, including National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci, and Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price have had the shortest service tenures in the history of their respective offices.[a]

Trump justified the instability, saying: "We have acting people. The reason they are acting is because I'm seeing how I like them, and I'm liking a lot of them very, very much. There are people who have done a bad job, and I let them go. If you call that turmoil, I don't call that turmoil. I say that is being smart. That's what we do."[4]

For comprehensiveness, the list below includes, in addition to dismissals and resignations, routine job changes such as promotions (e.g. Gina Haspel from CIA Deputy Director to Director), officials moving to a comparable position (e.g. John F. Kelly from Secretary of Homeland Security to Chief of Staff), and acting or temporary officials being replaced by permanent ones. The list does not include many lower level positions, however, such as that of executive director of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, Matthew Doherty, dismissed in November 2019,[5] without a replacement to lead the council that was created in 1987. But some less prominent officials are listed because their departure was newsworthy.

Also listed are the officials who resigned in the aftermath of the 2021 United States Capitol attack, well into the presidential transition, when their term would have ended soon anyway.

Color key[edit]

Color key:

  Denotes appointees serving in an acting capacity.

  Denotes appointees to an office which has since been abolished

Executive Office of the President[edit]

Office of the Vice President[edit]

Department of Agriculture[edit]

Department of Commerce[edit]

Department of Defense[edit]

Department of Education[edit]

Department of Energy[edit]

Department of Health and Human Services[edit]

Department of Homeland Security[edit]

Department of Housing and Urban Development[edit]

Department of the Interior[edit]

Department of Justice[edit]

Department of Labor[edit]

Department of State[edit]

Department of Transportation[edit]

Department of the Treasury[edit]

Department of Veterans Affairs[edit]

Office Name Took office Left office Notes
Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg
Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Robert Snyder.jpg
Robert Snyder
January 20, 2017 February 14, 2017
David Shulkin official photo (cropped).jpg
David Shulkin
February 14, 2017 March 28, 2018 On March 28, 2018, Trump announced on Twitter that Shulkin had been fired.[6][7] Following his dismissal, controversy erupted about efforts by the White House to privatize VA healthcare[8] and Shulkin's allegedly inappropriate taxpayer-funded foreign trips.[9]
Robert Wilkie official portrait.jpg
Robert Wilkie
March 28, 2018 May 29, 2018
Peter O'Rourke official photo.jpg
Peter O'Rourke
May 29, 2018 July 30, 2018
Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg
Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Gina S. Farrisee (cropped).jpg
Gina Farrisee
January 20, 2017 February 25, 2017
Scott Blackburn February 26, 2017 August 9, 2017
Thomas G. Bowman official photo (cropped).jpg
Thomas G. Bowman
August 10, 2017 June 15, 2018 Retired.[10]
James Byrne official photo.jpg
James Byrne
September 16, 2019 February 3, 2020 [11]
Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg
General Counsel of Veterans Affairs
August 8, 2017 September 16, 2019 [11]
Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg
Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs (Health)
Poonam Alaigh May 2017 September 25, 2017 [12]
Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg
Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs
(Human Resources and Administration)
Peter Shelby official photo (cropped).jpg
Peter Shelby
February 24, 2018 Summer 2018 Retired.
Seal of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.svg
Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs
(Operations, Security and Preparedness)
Donald P. Loren official photo (cropped).jpg
Donald P. Loren

Intelligence community[edit]

Office Name Took office Left office Notes
Seal of the Central Intelligence Agency.svg
Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
Meroe Park January 20, 2017 January 23, 2017
Mike Pompeo CIA headshot.jpg
Mike Pompeo
January 23, 2017 April 26, 2018 Became Secretary of State.
Seal of the Central Intelligence Agency.svg
Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
Gina Haspel official CIA portrait (cropped).jpg
Gina Haspel
February 2, 2017 May 21, 2018 Became Director of the Central Intelligence Agency.
The Office of the Director of National Intelligence.svg
Director of National Intelligence
Dan Coats official DNI portrait.jpg
Dan Coats
March 16, 2017 August 15, 2019 [13]
Joseph Maguire official photo.jpg
Joseph Maguire
August 16, 2019 February 21, 2020 [14]
Seal of the United States National Counterterrorism Center.svg
Director of the National Counterterrorism Center
December 27, 2018 August 16, 2019
Russ-Travers.jpg
Russell Travers
December 24, 2017 December 27, 2018
August 16, 2019 March 18, 2020 [15]
Seal of the United States National Counterterrorism Center.svg
Deputy Director of the National Counterterrorism Center
November 13, 2017 March 18, 2020
The Office of the Director of National Intelligence.svg
Director of National Intelligence
Richard Grenell official portrait.jpg
Richard Grenell
February 20, 2020 May 26, 2020 Grenell was also Ambassador to Germany.
The Office of the Director of National Intelligence.svg
Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence
Susan M. Gordon official photo.jpg
Susan M. Gordon
September 5, 2017 August 15, 2019 Gordon leaving along with Coats cleared the way for Trump to appoint Maguire as acting DNI.[b]
Andrew P. Hallman official photograph.jpg
Andrew P. Hallman
October 30, 2019 February 21, 2020 [16]
The Office of the Director of National Intelligence.svg
Chief Operating Officer of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Deirdre Walsh official photo.jpg
Deirdre Walsh
February 2018 May 8, 2020 [17]
The Office of the Director of National Intelligence.svg
General Counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Jason Klitenic official photo.jpg
Jason Klitenic
August 6, 2018 March 2020 [18]
Inspector General of the Intelligence Community Michael K. Atkinson official photo.jpg
Michael Atkinson
May 17, 2018 April 2020 Fired by Trump after raising concerns from a whistleblower that led to Trump's impeachment[19]

Independent agencies[edit]

Office Name Took office Left office Notes
Seal of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.svg
Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission
Jay Clayton.jpg
Jay Clayton
May 4, 2017 December 31, 2020 [20]
US-CFTC-Seal.svg
Chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Chris Giancarlo official photo (cropped).jpg
J. Christopher Giancarlo
August 3, 2017 April 13, 2019
CFPB Logo.png
Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
Richard Cordray official portrait (cropped).jpg
Richard Cordray
January 4, 2012 November 24, 2017 After President Trump was inaugurated, he and Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney worked to undermine Cordray and the CFPB.[21]
cropped
Mick Mulvaney
November 25, 2017 December 11, 2018
CFPB Logo.png
Deputy Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
DavidSilbermanCFPB.jpg
David Silberman
January 11, 2016 November 24, 2017
Leandra English November 24, 2017 July 9, 2018
Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) Logo.svg
Chief of External Affairs for the Corporation for National and Community Service
Carl Higbie August 2017 January 19, 2018 Resigned in January 2018 after racist, sexist, anti-Muslim and anti-LGBT comments, and comments about fellow veterans with PTSD, came to light.[22][23]
Environmental Protection Agency logo.svg
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency
Scott Pruitt official portrait (cropped).jpg
Scott Pruitt
February 17, 2017 July 9, 2018 Resignation tendered July 5, to be effective Friday, July 6, when the Deputy Administrator became Acting Administrator.[24][25]
Environmental Protection Agency logo.svg
Deputy Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency
Andrew Wheeler official photo.jpg
Andrew R. Wheeler
April 20, 2018 February 28, 2019 Became EPA Administrator.[26]
Environmental Protection Agency logo.svg
Assistant Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency for Air and Radiation
Bill Wehrum official photo.jpg
William Wehrum
November 20, 2017 June 30, 2019
Environmental Protection Agency logo.svg
General Counsel of the Environmental Protection Agency
Matt Leopold official photo.jpg
Matthew Leopold
January 8, 2018 October 5, 2020 [27]
Seal of the United States Federal Communications Commission.svg
Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission
Mignon Clyburn official photo (cropped).jpg
Mignon Clyburn
August 3, 2009 June 2018 Retired.
Seal of the National Labor Relations Board.svg
Chairman of the National Labor Relations Board
Philip A. Miscimarra official photo.jpg
Philip A. Miscimarra
January 23, 2017 April 23, 2017
April 24, 2017 December 16, 2017
National Mediation Board Seal.gif
Member of the National Mediation Board
Linda Puchala official photo.jpg
Linda Puchala
November 2, 2017 July 1, 2018
US-OfficeOfGovernmentEthics-Logo.svg
Director of the Office of Government Ethics
Walter Shaub.jpg
Walter Shaub
January 9, 2013 July 19, 2017 Shaub was outspoken with concerns about the Trump Administration during the transition period and after Trump's inauguration.[28][29][30][31][32] Shaub resigned six months before the end of his term, saying that ethics rules should be tighter.[33][34]
Seal of the United States Office of Personnel Management.svg
Director of the Office of Personnel Management
Jeff T. H. Pon official photo (cropped).jpg
Jeff Tien Han Pon
March 9, 2018 October 5, 2018
Margaret Weichert official photo.png
Margaret Weichert
October 5, 2018 September 16, 2019
Dale Cabaniss September 16, 2019 March 17, 2020 [35]
OPIC logo2014 cmyk.png
President and CEO of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation
Ray Washburne official photo.jpg
Ray Washburne
September 5, 2017 March 1, 2019
Seal of the United States Federal Housing Finance Agency.svg
Director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency
Mel Watt official photo.jpg
Mel Watt
January 6, 2014 January 6, 2019
US-SmallBusinessAdmin-Seal.svg
Administrator of the Small Business Administration
Joseph Loddo, Administrator of the Small Business Administration of the United States Acting.png
Joseph Loddo
January 20, 2017 February 14, 2017
Linda McMahon official photo.jpg
Linda McMahon
February 14, 2017 April 12, 2019 In March 2019, the former WWE executive announced she was leaving the SBA to work for the America First Action SuperPAC.[36]
Chris Pilkerton official photo (cropped).jpg
Chris Pilkerton
April 13, 2019 January 13, 2020 Pilkerton was also the General Counsel of the SBA from June 2017 to March 2020.
US-SmallBusinessAdmin-Seal.svg
Deputy Administrator of the Small Business Administration
Althea Coetzee official photo.jpg
Althea Coetzee
August 3, 2017 April 15, 2018 [37]
Seal of the United States Federal Election Commission.svg
Commissioner of the Federal Election Commission
Ann Ravel.jpg
Ann M. Ravel
October 25, 2013 March 1, 2017
Lee E. Goodman by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Lee E. Goodman
October 22, 2013 February 16, 2018
FEC Matthew S Petersen.jpg
Matthew S. Petersen
June 24, 2008 August 31, 2019
FEC Caroline C Hunter.jpg
Caroline C. Hunter
June 24, 2008 July 3, 2020 [38]

United States Postmaster General
Megan Brennan USPMG at 225th Anniversary of U.S. Coast Guard stamp event.jpg
Megan Brennan
February 1, 2015 June 15, 2020 [39]

Deputy United States Postmaster General
Ronald Stroman March 2011 June 1, 2020 [40]
USAID-Identity.svg
Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development
Mark Green official photo.jpg
Mark Green
August 7, 2017 April 10, 2020 [41]
USAID-Identity.svg
Deputy Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development
Bonnie Glick official photo.jpg
Bonnie Glick
January 2019 November 6, 2020 Terminated without cause by the Trump Administration hours before acting Administrator John Barsa reached the maximum amount of time allowed to serve in that position without Senate confirmation under the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998.[42][43][44]
USAID-Identity.svg
Deputy White House Liaison of the United States Agency for International Development
Merritt Corrigan June 2020 August 3, 2020 Forced out after a history of anti-LGBTQ comments soon after starting in the role.[45]
NASA logo.svg
NASA Associate Administrator
(Human Exploration and Operations)
Gerstenmaier.jpg
William Gerstenmaier
August 12, 2005 July 10, 2019
KenBowersox.jpg
Ken Bowersox
July 10, 2019 October 16, 2019
Doug Loverro October 16, 2019 May 19, 2020 Bowersox returned as Acting Associate Administrator.[46]
VOA logo.svg
Director of the Voice of America
VOA Director Amanda Bennett April 27 2017.jpg
Amanda Bennett
March 2016 June 15, 2020 [47]
Middle East Broadcasting Networks logo 20190429.jpg
Director of Middle East Broadcasting Networks
Alberto M Fernandez ambassador.jpg
Alberto Fernandez
July 2017 June 17, 2020 Fired by Michael Pack, the new CEO of the U.S. Agency for Global Media[48]
RFERL primary brandmark.svg
President of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
Jamie Fly August 1, 2019

President of Radio Free Asia
Bay Fang November 20, 2019
US-TennesseeValleyAuthority-Logo.svg
Chairman of Tennessee Valley Authority
James “Skip” Thompson.jpg
James "Skip" Thompson
May 2019 August 3, 2020 Fired after TVA announced that 200 American workers would be replaced with cheaper foreign workers. That decision was reversed on August 6.[49]

Banks[edit]

Office Name Took office Left office Notes
Governor of the African Development Bank Geoffrey Okamoto.jpg
Geoffrey Okamoto[50]
March 2018
EBRD logo (2).png
Governor of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

In the aftermath of the 2021 Capitol attack[edit]

Dozens of Trump administration officeholders resigned in reaction to the Capitol storming, even though their terms in office would expire fourteen days later with the inauguration of President Biden. Some senior officials, however, decided against resigning in order to ensure an "orderly transition of power" to the incoming Biden administration, out of concern that Trump would replace them with loyalist lower-level staffers who they feared could carry out illegal orders given by him.[51]

  1. Stephanie Grisham, the chief of staff for First Lady Melania Trump
  2. Sarah Matthews, the White House Deputy Press Secretary
  3. Anna Cristina Niceta Lloyd "Rickie", White House Social Secretary resigned in protest on the day of the storming of the Capitol.[52][53][54]
  4. Chris Liddell, White House Deputy Chief of Staff[55]
  5. Elaine Chao, United States Secretary of Transportation became the first cabinet member to announce her resignation, effective January 11.[56]
  6. Betsy DeVos, United States Secretary of Education also cited the Capitol Hill incident.[57] US Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) criticized DeVos and Chao for resigning rather than voting to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office.[58]
  7. Elinore F. McCance-Katz, Assistant Secretary of HHS for Mental health and Substance Use
  8. Mick Mulvaney, Trump's former chief of staff and the administration's special envoy to Northern Ireland. Upon his exit, Mulvaney said, "I can't do it. I can't stay ... Those who choose to stay, and I have talked with some of them, are choosing to stay because they're worried the President might put someone worse in." He also said Trump "wasn't the same as he was eight months ago."[59]
  9. Eric Dreiband, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division[59][60]
  10. Chad Wolf, Acting United States Secretary of Homeland Security resigned on January 11, saying it was "warranted by recent events, including" recent court decisions ruling that Trump's appointment of Wolf as acting secretary violated the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998.[61]
  11. Alex Azar, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services announced his resignation January 15, stating that it was due to the Capitol riots and stressing the need for a peaceful transfer of power. However, this resignation would only become effective starting January 20, the day President-elect Biden would be sworn in as president.[62]
  12. Jason Schmid, Senior GOP aide on the House Armed Services Committee[63]
  13. Tyler B. Goodspeed (R), Acting Chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisors
  14. John Costello, ( ) Deputy Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Security in the Commerce Department

Three members of the National Security Council resigned prematurely.

  1. Robert C. O'Brien, (R) National Security Advisor (United States)[64]
  2. Matthew Pottinger, (R) Deputy National Security Advisor (United States)[65]
  3. Ryan Tully, ( ) Senior Director on Russian and European Affairs for the National Security Council[66]

Five senior officials at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) resigned in protest.[67]

  1. Arjun Garg, ( ) Acting Deputy Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administrator,
  2. Brianna Manzelli, assistant administrator for communications;
  3. Kirk Shaffer, associate administrator for airports;
  4. Bailey Edwards, assistant administrator for policy, international affairs and environment
  5. Andrew Giacini, governmental affairs adviser, performing the duties of the assistant administrator for government and industry affairs

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Excluding interim appointments.
  2. ^ Coats or Gordon may be the "senior national security official" who told Jake Tapper: "Everyone at this point ignores what the president says and just does their job. The American people should take some measure of confidence in that."

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keith, Tamara (January 19, 2018). "Turnover In Trump's White House Is 'Record-Setting,' And It Isn't Even Close". NPR. Archived from the original on April 3, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  2. ^ Bach, Natasha (December 28, 2017). "Trump Staff Turnover Hits 34%—a First Year Presidential Record". Fortune. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  3. ^ Kanetkar, Riddhima (February 1, 2018). "Brenda Fitzgerald Joins Long List Of Short-Serving Trump Administration Officials". International Business Times. Archived from the original on February 1, 2018. Retrieved August 18, 2017.
  4. ^ "Remarks by President Trump During Visit to the Border Wall". whitehouse.gov. September 18, 2019. Archived from the original on January 20, 2021. Retrieved November 7, 2019 – via National Archives.
  5. ^ Stein, Jeff (November 16, 2019). "Trump administration ousts top homelessness official as White House prepares broad crackdown". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on December 29, 2019.
  6. ^ "Trump Ousts Shulkin From Veterans Affairs, Taps His Doctor". The New York Times. Associated Press. March 28, 2018. Archived from the original on March 30, 2018.
  7. ^ Rein, Lisa; Rucker, Philip; Wax-Thibodeaux, Emily; Dawsey, Josh (March 29, 2018). "Trump taps his doctor to replace Shulkin at VA, choosing personal chemistry over traditional qualifications". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 30, 2018. Retrieved March 30, 2018.
  8. ^ Shulkin, David J. (March 28, 2018). "David J. Shulkin: Privatizing the V.A. Will Hurt Veterans". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 30, 2018. Retrieved March 31, 2018.
  9. ^ "VA chief took in Wimbledon, river cruise on European work trip: Wife's expenses covered by taxpayers". The Washington Post. September 29, 2017. Archived from the original on September 29, 2017. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  10. ^ "VA announces new acting secretary, retirement of deputy secretary". Newton County Times. June 3, 2018. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Deputy VA secretary fired after less than 5 months on the job". Politico. February 3, 2020. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  12. ^ "Top VA health official steps down as major reforms loom". Archived from the original on February 25, 2018. Retrieved May 2, 2018.
  13. ^ Collins, Kaitlan; Brown, Pamela; Gaouette, Nicole; Cohen, Zachary; Marquardt, Alex (July 28, 2019). "Dan Coats to step down, Trump tweets, as President announces Ratcliffe will be nominated as next director of national intelligence". CNN. Archived from the original on July 28, 2019. Retrieved July 28, 2019.
  14. ^ Collins, Kaitlan; Cohen, Zachary; Atwood, Kylie; Fox, Lauren (February 19, 2020). "Trump names staunch loyalist and current US Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell as acting intelligence chief". CNN.
  15. ^ Budryk, Zack (March 19, 2020). "Acting director of National Counterterrorism Center fired: report". The Hill.
  16. ^ Dilanian, Ken; Mitchell, Andrea (February 20, 2020). "Trump angry after House briefed on 2020 Russia election meddling on his behalf". NBC News. Retrieved February 20, 2020.
  17. ^ Woodruff Swan, Betsy; Bertrand, Natasha; Lippman, Daniel (May 8, 2020). "Top career intelligence official departs ODNI". Politico. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  18. ^ Cheney, Kyle (February 18, 2020). "Top intel office lawyer who handled Ukraine whistleblower complaint resigning". Politico. Retrieved February 18, 2020.
  19. ^ Bertrand, Natasha; Desiderio, Andrew (April 3, 2020). "Trump fires intelligence community inspector general who defied him on Ukraine". Politico. Archived from the original on November 19, 2020. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  20. ^ "Trump's S.E.C. Chairman Is Stepping Down". The New York Times. November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  21. ^ "The Trump administration is trying to undermine the CFPB. It will fail". The Washington Post. February 14, 2018. Archived from the original on April 29, 2018. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  22. ^ Swanson, Ian (August 21, 2017). "Cable news Trump supporter Carl Higbie joins administration". TheHill. Archived from the original on September 15, 2017. Retrieved September 14, 2017.
  23. ^ Kaczynski, Andrew. "Trump appointee resigns as public face of agency that runs AmeriCorps after KFile review of racist, sexist, anti-Muslim and anti-LGBT comments on the radio". CNN. Archived from the original on January 19, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  24. ^ "The full text of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's resignation letter to President Trump". USA Today. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  25. ^ "Read EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's resignation letter". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 9, 2018. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  26. ^ "Senate confirms acting EPA chief for permanent role". Associated Press. Archived from the original on February 28, 2019. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  27. ^ "EPA's top lawyer to depart". Politico. Retrieved September 11, 2020.
  28. ^ Rein, Lisa (January 11, 2017). "Federal ethics chief blasts Trump's plan to break from businesses, calling it 'inadequate'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 13, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2017.
  29. ^ OGE Director Walter Shaub asks Trump to do more to resolve conflicts of interest. The Brookings Institution. Archived from the original on January 16, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2018 – via YouTube.
  30. ^ Selyukh, Alina (December 30, 2016). "U.S. Ethics Chief Was Behind Those Tweets About Trump, Records Show". NPR. Archived from the original on January 12, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2017 – via YouTube.
  31. ^ "Official U.S. Ethics Office Got Snarky With Donald Trump on Twitter". Fortune. Reuters. Archived from the original on January 13, 2017. Retrieved January 12, 2017.
  32. ^ "Office of Government Ethics, Memorandum to Chief of Staff to the President, Agency Heads, Designated Agency Ethics Officials, Inspectors General, and Appointees from Walter M. Shaub, Jr., Director, "Data Call for Certain Waivers and Authorizations" (PDF). United States Office of Government Ethics. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 10, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  33. ^ "Ethics Office Director Walter Shaub Resigns, Saying Rules Need To Be Tougher". Archived from the original on May 8, 2018. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  34. ^ "US government ethics chief resigns after clashes with Trump administration". The Daily Telegraph. United States Office of Government Ethics. July 6, 2017. Archived from the original on April 3, 2018. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  35. ^ "OPM chief Dale Cabaniss abruptly resigns". March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  36. ^ Horsley, Scott (March 29, 2019). "Linda McMahon To Quit Small Business Administration, Join Pro-Trump SuperPAC". NPR. Archived from the original on April 1, 2019. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  37. ^ "Exclusive: Deputy Administrator Allie Leslie Resigns From Small Business Administration – Big League Politics". April 3, 2018. Archived from the original on May 23, 2018. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  38. ^ Lippman, Daniel. "FEC losing quorum again after Caroline Hunter resigns". Politico. Retrieved June 26, 2020.
  39. ^ "Postmaster general who was target of Trump's ire announces retirement". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on October 17, 2019. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  40. ^ "USPS board set to lose quorum as deputy postmaster general resigns". Federal News Network. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  41. ^ "USAID administrator makes long-planned departure as coronavirus crisis rages". CNN. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  42. ^ Hansler, Jennifer; Atwood, Kylie (November 7, 2020). "Second highest-ranking official at USAID ousted". CNN. Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved November 8, 2020.
  43. ^ McEntee, John D. II (November 6, 2020). "Bonnie Glick Termination Letter". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved November 8, 2020.
  44. ^ Vlamis, Kelsey (November 8, 2020). "Trump dropped 3 agency heads in the days following the election, amid reports that more departures could be coming". Business Insider. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved November 8, 2020.
  45. ^ Verma, Pranshu. "Trump Appointee With History of Anti-L.G.B.T.Q. Remarks Leaves Aid Agency". New York Times. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  46. ^ Boyle, Alan (May 19, 2020). "Days before landmark launch, NASA's head of human spaceflight quits due to 'mistake'". Yahoo Finance.
  47. ^ Stelter, Brian; Jim Acosta (June 15, 2020). "Voice of America top officials resign as Trump-appointed CEO takes over international network". CNN.
  48. ^ Hansler, Jennifer; Brian Stelter (June 18, 2020). "'Wednesday night massacre' as Trump appointee takes over at global media agency". CNN.
  49. ^ Vazquez, Maegan (August 3, 2020). "Trump removes board chairman and calls for firing of Tennessee Valley Authority CEO over use of foreign workers". CNN.
  50. ^ "Trump Announces Key Additions to his Administration". whitehouse.gov. Archived from the original on January 20, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2019 – via National Archives.
  51. ^ Jacobs, Jennifer; Wadhams, Nick (January 7, 2021). "Trump Averts Mass-Resignation Crisis as Riot Tests Staff Loyalty". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  52. ^ Bennett, Kate (January 6, 2021). "First lady's chief of staff and former WH press secretary resigns over violent protests". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  53. ^ Sasina, Scott (January 7, 2021). "Multiple White House staffers resigning". WBNG. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  54. ^ Bennett, Kate (January 6, 2021). "Another senior East Wing staffer resigns following today's riots". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  55. ^ Tapper, Jake; Collins, Kaitlan; Atwood, Kylie; Salama, Vivian (January 6, 2021). "Top White House national security officials are considering resigning". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  56. ^ Snyder, Tanya (January 7, 2021). "Chao resigns from Transportation Department, citing 'traumatic,' 'avoidable' Capitol riot". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  57. ^ Leary, Natalie Andrews and Alex (January 8, 2021). "Schumer, Pelosi Call for Trump's Removal After Capitol Riot". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  58. ^ Forgey, Quint (January 8, 2021). "'They are running away': Clyburn blasts DeVos, Chao for resigning without invoking 25th Amendment". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  59. ^ a b Macias, Amanda (January 7, 2021). "'I can't stay here' – Mick Mulvaney resigns from Trump administration, expects others to follow". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  60. ^ "Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband Announces Departure from Civil Rights Division". justice.gov. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  61. ^ Mangan, Dan; Macias, Amanda (January 11, 2021). "Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf resigns, third Cabinet-level official to quit after pro-Trump riot at Capitol". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  62. ^ "Alex Azar resigns as Health and Human Services Secretary, citing Capitol mob". NBC News. Archived from the original on January 19, 2021. Retrieved January 19, 2021.
  63. ^ ANDREW DESIDERIO (January 12, 2021). "GOP aide resigns while lashing 'congressional enablers of this mob'". politico.com.
  64. ^ DANIEL LIPPMAN, LARA SELIGMAN and MERIDITH MCGRAW (January 6, 2021). "Deputy national security adviser resigns after Wednesday's chaos". politico.com.
  65. ^ Collins, Kaitlan; Salama, Vivian; Tapper, Jake; Atwood, Kylie (January 7, 2021). "Trump's deputy national security adviser resigns as other top officials consider quitting over Capitol riot". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  66. ^ Reuters Staff (January 7, 2021). "Trump's Russia adviser resigns, more departures expected soon – source". reuters.com.
  67. ^ Snyder, Tanya (January 7, 2021). "5 senior Trump appointees at FAA resign in protest". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.

External references[edit]