List of U.S. Routes in New York

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U.S. Route 9 markerU.S. Route 20 markerU.S. Route 219 marker
Standard U.S. Route shields in New York
Highway names
InterstatesInterstate X (I-X)
US HighwaysU.S. Route X (US X)
StateNew York State Route X (NY X)
System links

There are currently 16 U.S. Routes—14 mainline routes and two official special routes—that exist entirely or partially in New York. In New York, U.S. Routes are mostly maintained by the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), with some exceptions. U.S. Routes in New York are generally directly referenced by NYSDOT with their number; however, the letter "U" is suffixed to the number of the route on reference markers and in internal documents if there is numerical duplication between a U.S. Route and a state route. Two such numerical duplications exist: U.S. Route 2 and New York State Route 2 (US 2 and NY 2; inventoried as "2U" and "2", respectively), and US 15 and NY 15 ("15U" and "15").

The "From" column indicates the southern or western terminus of the route; likewise, the "To" column indicates the northern or eastern terminus of the route. The "mi" and "km" columns give the length of the route in miles and kilometers, respectively. Designations that are shaded in dark gray are numbers not currently assigned to a highway.

Mainline routes[edit]

Number Length (mi)[1] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
US 1 21.54 34.67 New Jersey line at Manhattan Connecticut line at Port Chester 01926-01-011926[2] current US 1 crosses the Hudson River from New Jersey via the George Washington Bridge and follows the Cross Bronx Expressway and the Boston Post Road through Manhattan, the Bronx and Westchester County to the Connecticut state line at Port Chester.
US 2 0.87 1.40 Rouses Point Vermont line at Rouses Point 01930-01-011930[3] current US 2 begins at US 11 in Rouses Point and crosses into Vermont while traversing the Richelieu River.
US 4 79.67 128.22 East Greenbush Vermont state line at Hampton 01926-01-011926[2] current US 4 begins at US 9 and US 20 in East Greenbush and follows the Hudson River north through Troy, Mechanicville, and Schuylerville to Hudson Falls. At Hudson Falls, the route breaks from the river and proceeds northeastward along the Champlain Canal to Whitehall, from where US 4 continues eastward to Fair Haven, Vermont.
US 6 77.85 125.29 Pennsylvania line at Port Jervis Connecticut line at Southeast 01927-01-011927[4] current US 6 enters and leaves New York in close proximity to I-84; however, US 6 follows a more circuitous route to the south between Middletown and Carmel via Peekskill. The route has overlaps with NY 17 and US 202 and crosses the Hudson River on the Bear Mountain Bridge.
US 6N Port Jervis Kingston 01928-01-011928[4] 01933-01-011933[4] US 6N was a spur of US 6 that connected US 6 in Port Jervis to US 9W in Kingston. It became part of US 209 c. 1935.
US 7 New York City line at Mount Vernon Connecticut line at Amenia 01926-01-011926[2] 01929-01-011929[5] The original plans for US 7 had the route entering New York at Amenia and following modern US 44 and NY 22 south to New York City. The route was reconfigured by 1929 to bypass New York to the east.
US 9 324.72 522.59 New Jersey line at Manhattan Champlain 01926-01-011926[2] current US 9 enters New York on the George Washington Bridge and follows the Hudson River from New York City to Albany, passing through Peekskill, Poughkeepsie, and Hudson along the way. North of Albany, US 9 follows I-87 through the northeastern counties of New York to Champlain, where it ends at I-87 about 1 mile (1.6 km) south of the Canadian border.
US 9E New York City line at Yonkers Waterford 01927-01-011927[6] 01930-01-011930[3] US 9E was the designation ultimately assigned to the proposed US 109 from New York City to Waterford. At Waterford, US 9E merged with US 9W to become US 9. Most of US 9E was absorbed by an extended US 9 in 1930.
US 9W 130.03 209.26 New Jersey line at Orangetown Albany 01927-01-011927[6] current US 9W follows the west bank of the Hudson River from New Jersey to Albany, where it ends at US 9. The route serves several riverside locations, namely Newburgh, Kingston, and Catskill. The portion of the route north of Kingston closely parallels the New York State Thruway (I-87).
US 11 318.79 513.04 Pennsylvania line at Kirkwood Canadian border at Rouses Point 01926-01-011926[2] current US 11 parallels I-81 northward through the Central New York cities of Binghamton, Cortland, and Syracuse to Watertown, where it turns northeastward to pass through the northern portion of the North Country. The route ends at the Canadian border in Rouses Point, where it continues into Canada as Quebec Route 223.
US 15 12.59 20.26 Pennsylvania line at Lindley Painted Post
originally Rochester
01939-01-01c. 1939[7][8] current US 15 follows a generally northerly alignment through southeastern Steuben County from Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, to Painted Post, where it ends at an interchange with I-86. It formerly extended north along NY 15 and NY 415 to Rochester, where it ended. It was truncated in 1974 to end at I-86. All of US 15 between I-86 and Pennsylvania is signed concurrently with Interstate 99.
US 20 372.00 598.68 Pennsylvania line at Ripley Massachusetts line at New Lebanon 01926-01-011926[2] current US 20 extends across the entire state, from Ripley in the west to New Lebanon in the east. It passes through Buffalo and Albany and serves several smaller cities in the Finger Lakes region, where US 20 has a lengthy overlap with NY 5.
US 44 65.64 105.64 Wawarsing Connecticut line at Millerton 01935-01-01c. 1935[9][10] current US 44 begins at US 209 near Kerhonkson, a hamlet in the town of Wawarsing, and travels eastward across the state to Millerton. The route is concurrent with NY 55 from US 209 to Poughkeepsie, where both routes cross the Hudson River on the Mid-Hudson Bridge before splitting east of downtown.
US 62 102.81 165.46 Pennsylvania line at Frewsburg Niagara Falls 01932-01-01c. 1932[11][12] current US 62 traverses the westernmost counties of New York, indirectly serving Jamestown and directly serving Gowanda, Hamburg, and Buffalo. The route ends at NY 104 in downtown Niagara Falls.
US 104 Niagara Falls Mexico 01935-01-01c. 1935[9][10] 01972-01-01c. 1972[13][14] US 104 extended from the Rainbow Bridge in Niagara Falls to I-81 in the town of Mexico via Rochester and Oswego. The route was replaced with NY 104 c. 1972.
US 109 New York City line at Yonkers Glens Falls 01926-01-011926[2] 01927-01-011927[6] US 109 was proposed in 1925 as a highway extending from New York City to US 9 in Glens Falls. It was partially designated as US 9E in 1927.
US 202 55.59 89.46 New Jersey line at Suffern Connecticut line at Southeast 01934-01-011934[15] current US 202 heads northeast across downstate New York from Suffern to Southeast. Along the way, it passes through Peekskill and Brewster and crosses the Hudson River on the Bear Mountain Bridge.
US 209 60.98 98.14 Pennsylvania line at Port Jervis Kingston 01935-01-01c. 1935[10][16] current US 209 enters New York at Port Jervis and heads generally northeasterly through Wurtsboro and Ellenville to Kingston, where it ends at an interchange with US 9W and NY 199.
US 219 67.63 108.84 Pennsylvania line at Limestone West Seneca 01935-01-011935[9][10] current US 219 heads north–south through Cattaraugus and Erie Counties, serving Salamanca, Springville, and Buffalo. The portion of the route between Springville and its northern terminus at I-90 in West Seneca is a limited-access highway.
US 220 0.09 0.14 Pennsylvania line at Waverly Waverly 01926-01-011926[2] 02017-01-012017[17] US 220 entered New York just north of I-86/NY 17 exit 60 in the village of Waverly and ended 0.09 miles (0.14 km) later at Chemung Street, the pre-Southern Tier Expressway routing of NY 17 through the village. Before US 220 was decommissioned in New York, the route was maintained by the village of Waverly.
US 309 Pennsylvania line at Waverly Waverly 01929-01-011929[citation needed] 01963-01-011963[citation needed] US 309 followed Pennsylvania Avenue through Waverly to Chemung Street, then part of NY 17. All of US 309 in New York was concurrent with US 220.
  •       Former

Special routes[edit]

Number Length (mi)[1] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
US 20A 83.41 134.24 Hamburg East Bloomfield 01939-01-01c. 1939[7][8] current US 20A is a southerly alternate route of US 20 between Hamburg and East Bloomfield. Along the way, the route passes through the villages of East Aurora, Warsaw, and Geneseo.

US 62 Bus.
2.14 3.44 Niagara Falls Niagara Falls 02006-01-012006[18] current US 62 Business follows Pine Avenue from NY 104 to US 62. The route connects US 62 to the Pine Avenue commercial district and Hyde Park, a large city park northeast of downtown. US 62 Business was formerly NY 62A.

Unofficial special routes (those not formally recognized by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials):

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2014 Traffic Data Report for New York State" (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. July 22, 2015. Retrieved September 23, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Bureau of Public Roads & American Association of State Highway Officials (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Washington, DC: U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. Retrieved November 7, 2013 – via University of North Texas Libraries.
  3. ^ a b Automobile Legal Association (ALA) Automobile Green Book, 1930–31 and 1931–32 editions, (Scarborough Motor Guide Co., Boston, 1930 and 1931). The 1930–31 edition shows New York state routes prior to the 1930 renumbering
  4. ^ a b c Weingroff, Richard F. (July 27, 2009). "U.S. 6 – The Grand Army of the Republic Highway". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 20, 2010.
  5. ^ Automobile Blue Book. 3. Chicago: Automobile Blue Book, Inc. 1929. p. 13. Retrieved August 30, 2010.
  6. ^ a b c Automobile Blue Book. 1 (1927 ed.). Chicago: Automobile Blue Book, Inc. 1927. This edition shows U.S. Routes as they were first officially signed in 1927.
  7. ^ a b New York Road Map for 1938 (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. Esso. 1938.
  8. ^ a b New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting. Standard Oil Company. 1939.
  9. ^ a b c Road Map of New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. Texas Oil Company. 1934.
  10. ^ a b c d Road Map & Historical Guide – New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. Sun Oil Company. 1935.
  11. ^ New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company. Kendall Refining Company. 1931.
  12. ^ Texaco Road Map – New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company. Texas Oil Company. 1932.
  13. ^ Ontario (Map). Cartography by Rolph-McNally Limited. Gulf Oil. 1971. Archived from the original on March 26, 2009. Retrieved April 4, 2009.
  14. ^ Ontario (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company. Texaco. 1972. Archived from the original on March 26, 2009. Retrieved April 4, 2009.
  15. ^ Weingroff, Richard (January 9, 2009). "U.S. 202 – Maine to Delaware". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  16. ^ Rand McNally Official Road Map of New Jersey (Map). Gulf Refining Co. 1934.
  17. ^ "Special Committee on U. S. Route Numbering Meeting Minutes" (PDF). AASHTO. May 23, 2017.
  18. ^ "US 62 Business – Establishment" (PDF). American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. 2006. Retrieved April 3, 2009.[permanent dead link]