List of U.S. presidential campaign slogans

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1840–96[edit]

1840[edit]

1844[edit]

  • "54-40 or Fight" and "Reannexation of Texas and Reoccupation of Oregon"[1] – James K. Polk
  • "Who is James K. Polk?[1]Henry Clay
  • "Hurray, Hurray, the Country's Risin' – Vote for Clay and Frelinghuysen!" – 1844 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Henry Clay[2]

1848[edit]

  • "For President of the People"[1] – Zachary Taylor

1852[edit]

  • "We Polked you in '44, We shall Pierce you in '52" – 1852 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Pierce; the '44 referred to the 1844 election of James K. Polk as president.

1856[edit]

  • "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, Fremont" – 1856 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John Fremont

1860[edit]

  • "Vote yourself a Farm" – 1860 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Abraham Lincoln.

1864[edit]

  • "Don't trade horses in midstream" – 1864 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Abraham Lincoln.

1868[edit]

  • "Let Us Have Peace" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Vote as You Shot" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant

1872[edit]

  • "Grant Us Another Term" – 1872 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant[3]
  • "Turn the Rascals Out" – 1872 anti-Grant slogan against the Era of Good Stealings

1876[edit]

1884[edit]

  • "Rum, Romanism and Rebellion" – U.S. presidential election, 1884, Republicans attack opposition for views against prohibition
  • "Ma, Ma, where's my Pa?" – 1884 U.S. presidential slogan used by the James G. Blaine supporters against his opponent Grover Cleveland, the slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child in 1874. When Cleveland was elected President, his supporters added the line, "Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!"

1888[edit]

1896[edit]

1900–96[edit]

1900[edit]

  • "Four more years of the full dinner pail" – 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley
  • "Let Well Enough Alone" – 1900 U.S. presidential slogan of William McKinley

1916[edit]

  • "He has kept us out of war." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan
  • "He proved the pen mightier than the sword." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan
  • "War in the East, Peace in the West, Thank God for Woodrow Wilson." - Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan
  • "War in Europe - Peace in America - God Bless Wilson" - Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. Presidential campaign slogan

1920[edit]

1924[edit]

  • "Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge" – The 1924 presidential campaign slogan of Calvin Coolidge.

1928[edit]

  • "Who but Hoover?" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover.[5]
  • "A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover[6]

1932[edit]

  • "Happy Days Are Here Again" – 1932 slogan by Democratic presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • "We are turning the corner" – 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by Republican president Herbert Hoover.

1936[edit]

  • "Defeat the New Deal and Its Reckless Spending" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Let's Get Another Deck" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon, using a card game metaphor to answer the "new deal" cards metaphor of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Let's Make It a Landon-Slide" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Life, Liberty, and Landon" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Remember Hoover!" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt

1940[edit]

  • "No Fourth Term Either" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "Roosevelt for Ex-President" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell Willkie
  • "There's No Indispensable Man" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "We Want Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "Win with Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "Better A Third Termer than a Third Rater" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt

1944[edit]

  • "Don't swap horses in midstream" – 1944 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Roosevelt. The slogan was also used by Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 election.
  • "We are going to win this war and the peace that follows" – 1944 campaign slogan in the midst of World War II by Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt

1948[edit]

Instrumental version of "I'm Just Wild About Harry" recorded May 17, 1922. Duration 3:54.

Problems playing this file? See media help.
  • "I'm just wild about Harry" – 1948 U.S. presidential slogan of Harry S. Truman, taken from a 1921 popular song title written by Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake
  • "Pour it on 'em, Harry!" – 1948 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Harry S. Truman
  • "Give Em Hell, Harry!" (After a man shouted it during one of his whistlestop tours)

1952[edit]

1956[edit]

  • "I still like Ike" – 1956 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • "Peace and Prosperity" – 1956 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower

1960[edit]

  • "A time for greatness 1960" – U.S. presidential campaign theme of John F. Kennedy (Kennedy also used "We Can Do Better").

1964[edit]

  • "All the way with LBJ" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson
  • "In Your Heart, You Know He's Right" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barry Goldwater
  • "In Your Guts, You Know He's Nuts" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson supporters, answering Goldwater's slogan

1968[edit]

  • "Some People Talk Change, Others Cause It" – Hubert Humphrey, 1968
  • "This time, vote like your whole world depended on it" – (1968) slogan of Richard Nixon, written by Norman Herwood.
  • "To Begin Anew..." – Gene McCarthy 1968[7]
  • "Nixon's the One" – Richard M. Nixon, 1968

1972[edit]

  • "Nixon Now" – Richard M. Nixon, 1972[8] (also, "Nixon Now, More than Ever")
  • "Acid, Amnesty, and Abortion for All" – 1972 anti-Democratic Party slogan, from a statement made to reporter Bob Novak by Missouri Senator Thomas F. Eagleton (as related in Novak's 2007 memoir, Prince of Darkness)

1976[edit]

1980[edit]

1984[edit]

1988[edit]

1992[edit]

  • "For People, for a Change" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton
  • "It's Time to Change America" – a theme of the 1992 U.S. presidential campaign of Bill Clinton
  • "Putting People First" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton
  • "Ross for Boss" – a 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of independent presidential candidate H. Ross Perot.

1996[edit]

  • "Building a bridge to the twenty-first century" – Bill Clinton

2000–present[edit]

2000[edit]

2004[edit]

2008[edit]

  • "Yes We Can" – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008
  • "Change We Can Believe In." Also, simply: "Change." – 2008 US presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama
  • "Change We Need." and "Change." – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.
  • "Fired up! Ready to go!" – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008
  • "Hope" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.
  • "Country First" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John McCain
  • "Reform, prosperity and peace" – 2008 U.S. Presidential motto of John McCain.[9][10]
  • "People Fighting Back", and "We'll fight back" – Ralph Nader campaign slogan
  • "Ready for change, ready to lead" – Hillary Clinton campaign slogan, also "Big Challenges, Real Solutions: Time to Pick a President," "In to Win," "Working for Change, Working for You," and "The strength and experience to make change happen."[11]

2012[edit]

2016[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Presidential Campaign Slogans
  2. ^ Finkelman, Paul (2011). Millard Fillmore. p. 22. 
  3. ^ "Slogans in Presidential Campaigns" (PDF). The Center for Civic Education. Retrieved 2013-10-18. 
  4. ^ Conradt, Stacy (October 8, 2008). "The Quick 10: 10 Campaign Slogans of the Past". Mental Floss. Retrieved 27 May 2016. 
  5. ^ Gallery 5: The Logical Candidate, The Hoover Library & Museum.
  6. ^ Which president promised "a chicken in every pot"?, infoplease.
  7. ^ Nichols, John (December 11, 2005). "Eugene McCarthy's Lyrical Politics". The Nation (blog). Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  8. ^ Nixon Now (Nixon, 1972), Museum of the Moving Image (2012).
  9. ^ Montopoli, Brian (June 17, 2008). "McCain's Slogan: "Reform, Prosperity and Peace"". CBS News. Retrieved 2016-03-06. 
  10. ^ Hollywood double takes (#3) http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/hollywood-double-takes-actors-famous-faces-gallery-1.76789[not in citation given]
  11. ^ Smith, Ben (January 3, 2008). "Undecided: Hillary keeps shifting slogans". Politico. Retrieved 2016-02-19. 
  12. ^ a b Handy, Bruce (October 1, 2015). "Donald Trump vs. Carly Fiorina: The Definitive Scorecard". Vanity Fair. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  13. ^ Sweeney, Dan (December 28, 2015). "Jeb comes to South Florida, sans exclamation mark". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  14. ^ Nelson, Angela (December 26, 2015). "Huckabee's Hope is From "Tree Town" to Higher Ground". KIOW. Pilot Knob Broadcasting. Retrieved 2015-12-30. 
  15. ^ "2016 Presidential Campaign Slogan Survey". tagline guru. Retrieved 2015-10-19. 
  16. ^ Allen, Mike (April 6, 2015). "Rand Paul unveils populist, anti-establishment slogan". Politico. Retrieved 2015-12-30.