List of UEFA European Championship records

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This is a list of records of the UEFA European Championship and its qualification matches.

Team: tournament position[edit]

All time[edit]

Most championships[edit]

3,  Germany (1972, 1980, 1996),  Spain (1964, 2008, 2012)

# team championships
1  Germany (1972, 1980, 1996),  Spain (1964, 2008, 2012) 3
2  France (1984, 2000) 2
3  Czechoslovakia (1976),  Denmark (1992),  Greece (2004),  Italy (1968),  Netherlands (1988),  Soviet Union (1960) 1

Most finishes in the top two[edit]

6,  Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1992, 1996, 2008)

# team finishes in the top two
1  Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1992, 1996, 2008) 6
2  Soviet Union (1960, 1964, 1972, 1988),  Spain (1964, 1984, 2008, 2012) 4
3  Italy (1968, 2000, 2012) 3
4  Czech Republic (1976, 1996),  France (1984, 2000),  Yugoslavia (1960, 1968) 2
5  Belgium (1980),  Denmark (1992),  Greece (2004)  Netherlands (1988),  Portugal (2004) 1

Most finishes in the top four[edit]

8,  Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012)

# team finishes in the top four
1  Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012) 8
2  Russia (1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1988, 2008) 6
3  Czech Republic (1960, 1976, 1980, 1996, 2004),  Italy (1968, 1980, 1988, 2000, 2012),  Netherlands (1976, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2004) 5
4  France (1960, 1984, 1996, 2000),  Portugal (1984, 2000, 2004, 2012),  Spain (1964, 1984, 2008, 2012) 4
5  Denmark (1964, 1984, 1992),  Yugoslavia (1960, 1968, 1976) 3
6  Belgium (1972, 1980),  England (1968, 1996),  Hungary (1964, 1972) 2
7  Greece (2004),  Sweden (1992),  Turkey (2008) 1

Most finishes in the top eight[edit]

11,  Spain (1960, 1964, 1968, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2008, 2012)

# team finishes in the top eight
1  Spain (1960, 1964, 1968, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2008, 2012) 11
2  France (1960, 1964, 1968, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012),  Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012) 9
3  England (1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012),  Netherlands (1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008),  Russia (1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1988, 1992, 2008) 8
4  Italy (1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 2000, 2008, 2012),  Portugal (1960, 1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012) 7
5  Czech Republic (1960, 1976, 1980, 1996, 2004, 2012),  Yugoslavia (1960, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1984, 2000) 6
6  Denmark (1964, 1984, 1988, 1992, 2004) 5
7  Belgium (1972, 1976, 1980, 1984),  Romania (1960, 1972, 1984, 2000) 4
8  Greece (1980, 2004, 2012),  Hungary (1964, 1968, 1972),  Sweden (1964, 1992, 2004) 3
9  Croatia (1996, 2008),  Republic of Ireland (1964, 1988),  Turkey (2000, 2008) 2
10  Austria (1960),  Bulgaria (1968),  Luxembourg (1964),  Scotland (1992),  Wales (1976) 1
Most European Championship Finals appearances
11,  Germany (every tournament since 1972)
For a detailed list, see National team appearances in the UEFA European Football Championship
Most second-place finishes
3,  Germany (1976, 1992, 2008),  Soviet Union (1964, 1972, 1988)
Most third/fourth-place finishes
3,  Czech Republic (1960, 1980, 2004),  Portugal (1984, 2000, 2012)
Most 5th-8th-place finishes
7,  Spain (1960, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1988, 1996, 2000)

Consecutive[edit]

Most consecutive championships
2,  Spain (2008–2012)[1]
Most consecutive finishes in the top two
3,  West Germany (1972–1980)[2]
Most consecutive finishes in the top four
4,  Soviet Union (1960–1972)[2]
Most consecutive finishes in the top eight
7,  Germany (1972–1996)[2]
Most consecutive finals tournaments
11,  Germany (1972–2012)

Gaps[edit]

Longest gap between successive titles
44 years,  Spain (1964–2008)[2]
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top two
32 years,  Italy (1968–2000)[2]
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top four
28 years,  England (1968–1996)[2]
Longest gap between successive appearances in the top eight
28 years,  Sweden (1964–1992)[2]
Longest gap between successive appearances in the Finals
24 years,  France (1960–1984),  Greece (1980–2004),  Republic of Ireland (1988–2012)

Host team[edit]

Best finish by host team
Champion,  Spain (1964),  Italy (1968),  France (1984)[2]
Worst finish by host team
9th-16th position,  Belgium (2000),  Austria (2008),   Switzerland (2008),  Poland (2012),  Ukraine (2012)

Defending champion[edit]

Best finish by defending champion
winners,  Spain (2012)[1]
Worst finish by defending champion
failed to qualify and finished outside top eight,  France (1988)[3]
qualified and finished outside top eight,  Denmark (1996),  Germany (2000),  Greece (2008)[2]

Debuting teams[edit]

Best finish by a debuting team
champion,  Soviet Union (1960),  Spain (1964),  Italy (1968),  West Germany (1972)[2]

Other[edit]

Most finishes in the top two without ever being champion
2,  Yugoslavia (1960, 1968)
Most finishes in the top four without ever being champion
4,  Portugal (1984, 2000, 2004, 2012)
Most finishes in the top eight without ever being champion
8  England (1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012)
Most appearances in Finals without ever being champion
8,  England (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012)
Most finishes in the top four without ever finishing in the top two
2,  England (1968, 1996),  Hungary (1964, 1972)
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top two
8  England (1968, 1972, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2004, 2012)
Most appearances in Finals without ever finishing in the top two
8  England (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012)
Most finishes in the top eight without ever finishing in the top four
4,  Romania (1960, 1972, 1984, 2000)
Most appearances in Finals without ever finishing in the top four
4  Croatia (1996, 2004, 2008, 2012),  Romania (1984, 1996, 2000, 2008)

Team: tournament progress[edit]

All time[edit]

Progressed from the first round the most times (since 1980)
6  Germany (1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2008, 2012),  Netherlands (1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008)
Eliminated in the first round the most times (since 1980)
4  Denmark (1988, 1996, 2000, 2012),  England (1980, 1988, 1992, 2000),  Russia (1992, 1996, 2004, 2012)
Most appearances, always progressing from the first round (since 1980)
6  Portugal (1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012)
Most appearances, never progressing from the first round (since 1980)
3   Switzerland (1996, 2004, 2008)

Consecutive[edit]

Most consecutive progressions from the first round (since 1980)
6  Netherlands (1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008)
Most consecutive eliminations from the first round
2  England (1988–1992),  Russia (1992–1996),  Scotland (1992–1996),  Denmark (1996–2000),  Germany (2000–2004),   Switzerland (2004–2008),  Poland (2008–2012),  Sweden (2008–2012)

Team: Matches played/goals scored[edit]

All time[edit]

Most matches played
43,  Germany
Most wins
23,  Germany
Most losses
14,  Denmark
Most draws
15,  Italy
Most matches played without a win
6,  Poland
Most matches played before first win
8,  Romania,   Switzerland
Most goals scored
65,  Germany
Most goals conceded
45,  Germany
Fewest goals scored
1,  Austria,  Latvia,  Norway
Fewest goals conceded
1,  Norway
Most matches played always conceding a goal
6,  Poland
Highest average of goals scored per match
1.63,  Netherlands
Lowest average of goals scored per match
0.33,  Austria,  Latvia,  Norway
Highest average of goals conceded per match
2.79  Yugoslavia
Lowest average of goals conceded per match
0.33,  Norway (1 goal in 3 matches)
Most meetings between two teams
5 times,  Czech Republic vs  Germany (1976, 1980, 1996 (twice), 2004);  Germany vs  Netherlands (1980, 1988, 1992, 2004, 2012);  Italy vs  Spain (1980, 1988, 2008, 2012 (twice))
Most meetings between two teams, final match
2 times,  Czech Republic vs  Germany (1976, 1996)
Most tournaments unbeaten
4,  Germany (1972, 1976, 1980, 1996),  Spain (1964, 1996, 2008, 2012)
Most tournaments eliminated without having lost a match
2,  England (1996, 2012),  Italy (1980, 2004),  Netherlands (1992, 2000)
Most tournaments eliminated without having won a match (since 1980)
3,  Denmark (1988, 1996, 2000),  Romania (1984, 1996, 2008)

In one tournament[edit]

Most wins
5,  France (1984, out of 5; 2000, out of 6),  Spain (2008, out of 6)
Fewest wins, champions (since 1980)
2,  Denmark (1992, out of 5)
Most matches not won, champions
3,  Denmark (1992, out of 5)
Most wins by non-champion
4,  Italy (2000, out of 6),  Netherlands (2000, out of 5),  Czech Republic (2004, out of 5),  Germany (2008, out of 6),  Germany (2012, out of 5)
Most matches not won
4,  Czech Republic (1996, out of 6),  Netherlands (2004, out of 5),  Italy (2012, out of 6)
Most losses
3  Yugoslavia (1984),  Denmark (1988),  England (1988),  Romania (1996),  Turkey (1996),  Denmark (2000),  Bulgaria (2004),  Greece (2008),  Netherlands (2012),  Republic of Ireland (2012)
Most losses, champions
1,  Netherlands (1988),  Denmark (1992),  France (2000),  Greece (2004)
Most goals scored
14,  France (1984)
Fewest goals conceded
1,  Italy (1980),  Norway (2000),  Spain (2012)
Most goals conceded
13,  Yugoslavia (2000)
Most minutes without conceding a goal
509 mins,  Spain (2012)
Highest goal difference
+11,  Spain (2012)
Lowest goal difference
-8,  Yugoslavia (1984),  Denmark (2000),  Bulgaria (2004),  Republic of Ireland (2012)
Lowest goal difference, champions
+2,  Spain (1964),  Italy (1968),  Czechoslovakia (1976),  Denmark (1992)
Highest average of goals scored per match
2.8,  France (1984)
Highest average goal difference per match (since 1980)
+2,  France (1984)
Most goals scored, champions
14,  France (1984)
Fewest goals scored, champions (since 1980)
6,  West Germany (1980),  Denmark (1992)
Fewest goals scored, finalists (since 1980)
4,  Belgium (1980)
Fewest goals conceded, champions (since 1980)
1,  Spain (2012)
Most goals conceded, champions
7,  France (2000)
Lowest average of goals scored per match, champions
1.17,  Greece (2004)

Streaks[edit]

Most consecutive successful qualification attempts
[4] 6,  France (1992–2012),  Germany (1992–2012)[5]
Most consecutive failed qualification attempts
13,  Luxembourg,  Northern Ireland,  Wales (all 1964–2012)
Most consecutive wins
5,  France, from 1–0 Denmark (1984) to 2–0 Spain (1984),  Netherlands, from 3–1 England (1988) to 1–0 Scotland (1992)
Most consecutive matches without a loss
12,  Spain, from 4–1 Russia (2008) to 4–0 Italy (2012)
Most consecutive losses
6,  Yugoslavia, from 0–2 Italy (1968) to 2–3 France (1984)
Most consecutive matches without a win
9,  Soviet Union /  CIS /  Russia, from 0–2 Netherlands (1988) to 0–2 Portugal (2004)
Most consecutive draws
3,  Italy, from 0–0 Belgium (1980) to 1–1 West Germany (1988),  Sweden, from 1–1 Italy (2004) to 0–0 Netherlands (2004),  Italy, from 0–0 Spain (2008) to 1–1 Croatia (2012)
Most consecutive matches without a draw
16,  Czech Republic, from 1–2 Germany (1996) to 0–1 Portugal (2012)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least one goal
11,  England, from 1–1 Germany (1996) to 1–0 Ukraine (2012)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least two goals
9,  France, from 3–0 Denmark (2000) to 3–1 Switzerland (2004)
Most consecutive matches scoring at least three goals
3,  France, from 5–0 Belgium (1984) to 3–2 Portugal (1984),  Netherlands, from 3–0 Denmark (2000) to 6–1 Yugoslavia (2000)
Most consecutive matches without scoring a goal
4,  Denmark, from 0–2 West Germany (1988) to 0–1 Sweden (1992),   Switzerland, from 0–2 Netherlands (1996) to 0–3 England (2004),  Denmark, from 0–3 France (2000) to 0–0 Italy (2004)
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (clean sheets)
5,  Spain, from 4–0 Republic of Ireland (2012) to 4–0 Italy (2012)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal
509,  Spain (2012)
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal (including qualifying)
8,  Italy, from 0–0 Poland (1975) to 0–0 Belgium (1980)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (including qualifying)
784,  Italy (1975–1980)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least one goal
10,  Romania, from 1–1 Spain (1984) to 0–2 Italy (2000)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least two goals
7,  Yugoslavia, from 0–2 Italy (1968) to 3–3 Slovenia (2000)
Most consecutive matches conceding at least three goals
3,  Yugoslavia, from 0–5 Denmark (1984) to 3–3 Slovenia (2000),  Czech Republic, from 1–3 Portugal (2008) to 1–4 Russia (2012)

Individual[edit]

For records regarding goalscoring, see Goalscoring; for records regarding goalkeeping, see Goalkeeping
Most tournaments played
4, Lothar Matthäus (Germany Germany, 1980–1988, 2000), Peter Schmeichel (Denmark Denmark, 1988–2000), Aron Winter (Netherlands Netherlands, 1988–2000), Alessandro del Piero (Italy Italy, 1996–2008), Edwin van der Sar (Netherlands Netherlands, 1996–2008), Lilian Thuram (France France, 1996–2008), Olof Mellberg (Sweden Sweden, 2000–2012), Iker Casillas (Spain Spain, 2000–2012)[6]
Most championships
2, Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas, Cesc Fàbregas, Andrés Iniesta, Sergio Ramos, David Silva, Fernando Torres, Xavi ( Spain, 2008–2012) (played in two winning finals); Álvaro Arbeloa, Santi Cazorla ( Spain, 2008–2012) (played in one winning final, and unused squad member in a second winning final); Rainer Bonhof ( West Germany, 1972,1980), Raúl Albiol, Pepe Reina ( Spain, 2008–2012) (unused squad member in two winning finals)
Most matches played, Finals
16, Edwin van der Sar (Netherlands Netherlands, 1996–2008), Lilian Thuram (France France, 1996–2008)
Most minutes played, Finals
1535 minutes, Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008)
Most matches won
9, Lilian Thuram & Zinédine Zidane ( France, 1996–2004); Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008); Nuno Gomes ( Portugal, 2000–2008); Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas & Fernando Torres ( Spain, 2004–2012); Cesc Fàbregas & Andrés Iniesta ( Spain, 2008–2012)
Most appearances in a final
2, Valentin Ivanov, Viktor Ponedelnik & Lev Yashin ( Soviet Union, 1960 & 1964); Franz Beckenbauer, Uli Hoeneß, Sepp Maier, Georg Schwarzenbeck & Herbert Wimmer ( West Germany, 1972 & 1976); Bernard Dietz ( West Germany, 1976 & 1980); Thomas Häßler, Thomas Helmer, Jürgen Klinsmann & Matthias Sammer ( Germany, 1992 & 1996); Xabi Alonso, Iker Casillas, Cesc Fàbregas, Andrés Iniesta, Sergio Ramos, David Silva, Fernando Torres & Xavi ( Spain, 2008 & 2012)
Most appearances as captain
11, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2008–2012)
Youngest player
18 years and 71 days, Jetro Willems ( Netherlands, vs  Denmark, 2012)[7]
Youngest player, final
19 years and 150 days, Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, vs  Greece, 2004)
Youngest player, winning team
20 years and 64 days, Pietro Anastasi ( Italy, vs  Yugoslavia, 1968)
Oldest player
39 years and 91 days, Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, vs  Portugal, 20 June 2000)
Oldest player, final
38 years and 232 days, Jens Lehmann ( Germany, vs  Spain, 2008)
Oldest player, winning team
37 years and 54 days, Arnold Mühren ( Netherlands, vs  West Germany, 1988)
Largest age difference on a champion team
13 years and 182 days, 1988,  Netherlands (Arnold Mühren: 37 years and 54 days; Marco van Basten: 23 years and 238 days)
Longest period between Finals appearances
15 years and 360 days, Dragan Stojković ( Yugoslavia, 1984–2000).
Longest span of Finals appearances
20 years and 6 days, Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, 1980–2000)

Goalscoring[edit]

Individual[edit]

Most goals scored, Finals
9, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)[6]
For a complete list of goalscorers, see European Championships goalscorers
Most goals scored, including qualifying
21, Jan Koller ( Czech Republic: 6 in 2000, 8 in 2004, 7 in 2008), Jon Dahl Tomasson ( Denmark: 6 in 2000, 8 in 2004, 7 in 2008),[8] Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal: 2 in 2004, 9 in 2008, 10 in 2012)
Most goals scored in a tournament
9, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)[6]
Most goals scored in a match
3, on eight occasions
Most goals scored in a qualifying match
5, Malcolm Macdonald ( England, 5–0 vs  Cyprus, 16 April 1975); Tibor Nyilasi ( Hungary, 8–1 vs  Luxembourg, 19 October 1975); Marco van Basten ( Netherlands, 8–0 vs  Malta, 19 December 1990)
Most goals scored in one final
2, Gerd Müller ( West Germany vs  Soviet Union, 1972); Horst Hrubesch ( West Germany vs  Belgium, 1980); Oliver Bierhoff ( Germany vs  Czech Republic, 1996)[2]
Most matches with at least one goal
6, Alan Shearer ( England, 1996–2000)
Most consecutive matches with at least one goal
5, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)
Most matches with at least two goals
2, Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1972); Michel Platini ( France, 1984); Rudi Völler ( West Germany, 1984 & 1988); Wayne Rooney ( England, 2004)
Most consecutive matches with at least two goals
2, Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1972); Michel Platini ( France, 1984); Wayne Rooney ( England, 2004)
Most hat-tricks
2, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)
Most consecutive hat-tricks
2, Michel Platini ( France, 1984)
Fastest hat-trick
18 minutes, Michel Platini ( France vs  Yugoslavia, 1984)[2]
Most goals scored by a substitute in a match
3, Dieter Müller ( West Germany vs  Yugoslavia, 1976)
Scoring in every match of the Finals
Viktor Ponedelnik ( Soviet Union, 2 goals in 2 matches, 1960); Jesús María Pereda ( Spain, 2 goals in 2 matches, 1964); Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 4 goals in 2 matches, 1972); Dieter Müller ( West Germany, 4 goals in 2 matches, 1976); Michel Platini ( France, 9 goals in 5 matches, 1984)[9]
Most tournaments with at least one goal
3, Jürgen Klinsmann, ( Germany, 1988–1996); Vladimír Šmicer ( Czech Republic, 1996–2004); Thierry Henry ( France, 2000–2008); Nuno Gomes ( Portugal, 2000–2008); Hélder Postiga ( Portugal, 2004–2012); Cristiano Ronaldo ( Portugal, 2004–2012); Zlatan Ibrahimović ( Sweden, 2004–2012)[6]
Most tournaments with at least two goals
3, Zlatan Ibrahimović ( Sweden, 2004–2012)
Youngest goalscorer
18 years and 141 days, Johan Vonlanthen (  Switzerland vs  France, 2004)[10]
Youngest hat-trick scorer
22 years and 77 days, Dieter Müller ( Germany vs  Yugoslavia, 1976)
Youngest goalscorer, final
20 years and 64 days, Pietro Anastasi ( Italy vs  Yugoslavia, 1968)
Oldest goalscorer
38 years and 257 days, Ivica Vastić ( Austria vs  Poland, 2008)[11]
Oldest hat-trick scorer
28 years and 364 days, Michel Platini ( France vs  Yugoslavia, 1984)
Oldest goalscorer, final
30 years, 103 days, Bernd Hölzenbein ( West Germany vs  Czechoslovakia, 1976)
Most penalties scored (excluding penalty shoot-outs)
2, Alan Shearer ( England, one in 1996, one in 2000); Gaizka Mendieta ( Spain, two in 2000); Zinédine Zidane ( France, one in 2000, one in 2004)
Fastest goal
68 seconds, Dmitri Kirichenko ( Russia vs  Greece, 2004) [12]
Fastest goal by a substitute
< 1 minute, Alessandro Altobelli ( Italy vs  Denmark, 1988); Juan Carlos Valeron ( Spain vs  Russia, 2004)
Fastest goal in a final
6 minutes, Jesús María Pereda ( Spain vs  Soviet Union, 1964)
Latest goal from kickoff
120th minute, Semih Şentürk ( Turkey vs  Croatia, 2008)
Latest goal from kickoff in a final
113th minute, Viktor Ponedelnik ( Soviet Union vs  Yugoslavia 1960)
Latest goal from kickoff, with no goals scored in between
117th minute, Ivan Klasnić ( Croatia vs  Turkey, 2008)

Team[edit]

Biggest margin of victory
5,  France (5) vs  Belgium (0), 1984;  Denmark (5) vs  Yugoslavia (0), 1984;  Netherlands (6) vs  Yugoslavia (1), 2000;  Sweden (5) vs  Bulgaria (0), 2004[2]
Biggest margin of victory, qualifying match
13,  Germany (13) vs  San Marino (0), September 6, 2006, Group 4
Most goals scored in a match, one team
6,  Netherlands, vs  Yugoslavia, 2000
Most goals scored in a match, both teams
9,  Yugoslavia (5) vs  France (4), 1960
Highest scoring draw
3–3,  Czech Republic vs  Russia, 1996;  Slovenia vs  Yugoslavia, 2000
Largest deficit overcome in a win
2 goals,  Yugoslavia, 1960 (coming from 1–3 and 2–4 down to win 5–4 vs  France);  West Germany, 1976 (coming from 0–2 down to win 4–2 after extra time vs  Yugoslavia);  Denmark, 1984 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Belgium);  Czech Republic, 2004 (coming from 0-2 down to win 3-2 vs  Netherlands);  Turkey, 2008 (coming from 0–2 down to win 3–2 vs  Czech Republic)
Largest deficit overcome in a draw
3 goals,  Yugoslavia, 2000 (coming from 0–3 down to draw 3–3 vs  Slovenia)
Most goals scored in extra time, both teams
3,  France (3) vs  Portugal (2), 1984
Most goals scored in a final, one team
4,  Spain, 2012
Most goals scored in a final, both teams
4,  Czech Republic (2) vs  West Germany (2), 1976;  Italy (0) vs  Spain (4), 2012
Fewest goals scored in a final, both teams
1,  Greece (1) vs  Portugal (0), 2004;  Spain (1) vs  Germany (0), 2008
Biggest margin of victory in a final
4,  Spain (4) vs  Italy (0), 2012
Largest deficit overcome in a win in a final
1,  Soviet Union, 1960 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs  Yugoslavia);  Germany, 1996 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs  Czech Republic);  France, 2000 (coming from 0–1 down to win 2–1 after extra time vs  Italy)
Most individual goalscorers for one team, one match
4,  Yugoslavia vs  France, 1960 (Milan Galić, Ante Žanetić, Tomislav Knez, Dražan Jerković);  Denmark vs  Yugoslavia, 1984 (Frank Arnesen, Klaus Berggreen, Preben Elkjaer-Larsen, John Lauridsen);  Sweden vs  Bulgaria, 2004 (Fredrik Ljungberg, Henrik Larsson, Zlatan Ibrahimovic, Marcus Allbäck);  Germany vs  Greece, 2012 (Philipp Lahm, Sami Khedira, Miroslav Klose, Marco Reus);  Spain vs  Italy, 2012 (David Silva, Jordi Alba, Fernando Torres, Juan Mata)
Most individual goalscorers for one team, one tournament
8,  Germany, 2012 (Mario Gómez, Lukas Podolski, Lars Bender, Philipp Lahm, Sami Khedira, Miroslav Klose, Marco Reus, Mesut Özil)

Tournament[edit]

Most goals scored in a tournament
85 goals, 2000
Fewest goals scored in a tournament
7 goals, 1968
Fewest goals scored in a tournament (since 1980)
27 goals, 1980
Most goals per match in a tournament
4.75 goals per match, 1976
Most goals per match in a tournament (since 1980)
2.74 goals per match, 2000
Fewest goals per match in a tournament
1.4 goals per match, 1968
Fewest goals per match in a tournament (since 1980)
1.93 goals per match, 1980
Most scorers in a tournament
53, 2000, 2008 & 2012
Most players scoring at least two goals in a tournament
20, 2000
Most players scoring at least three goals in a tournament
8, 2004
Most players scoring at least four goals in a tournament
3, 2000 & 2004
Most players scoring at least five goals in a tournament
2, 2000

Own goals[edit]

Anton Ondruš,  Czechoslovakia vs  Netherlands, 1976; Lyuboslav Penev,  Bulgaria vs  France, 1996; Dejan Govedarica,  Yugoslavia vs  Netherlands, 2000; Jorge Andrade,  Portugal vs  Netherlands, 2004; Glen Johnson,  England vs  Sweden, 2012

Top scoring teams by tournament[edit]

Teams listed in bold won the tournament.

Goalkeeping[edit]

Most clean sheets (matches without conceding)
9, Edwin van der Sar ( Netherlands, 1996–2008); Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2004–2012)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (finals)
509 mins, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)
Most consecutive minutes without conceding a goal (including qualifying)
784 mins (including 8 consecutive clean sheets), Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1975–1980)
Most goals conceded
20, Peter Schmeichel ( Denmark, 1988–2000)
Most goals conceded, one tournament
13, Ivica Kralj ( Yugoslavia), 2000
Most goals conceded, one match
6, Ivica Kralj ( Yugoslavia), 2000 (vs  Netherlands)
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament, champions
1, Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1968); Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)
Fewest goals conceded, one tournament
1, Dino Zoff ( Italy, 1968); Thomas Myhre ( Norway, 2000); Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2012)

Coaching[edit]

Most matches coached
11, Berti Vogts ( Germany, 1992–1996); Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2012)
Most matches won
8, Joachim Löw ( Germany, 2008–2012)
Most championships
no coach has won the title on more than one occasion
Most tournaments
3, Lars Lagerbäck, ( Sweden, 2000–2008)
Most nations coached
2, Guus Hiddink ( Netherlands, 1996;  Russia, 2008); Giovanni Trapattoni ( Italy, 2004;  Republic of Ireland, 2012); Dick Advocaat ( Netherlands, 2004;  Russia, 2012)
Most consecutive tournaments with same team
3, Lars Lagerbäck, ( Sweden, 2000–2008)
Most consecutive wins
5, Michel Hidalgo ( France, 1984); Rinus Michels ( Netherlands, 1988–1992)
Most consecutive matches without a loss
8, Rinus Michels ( Netherlands, 1988–1992)
Youngest coach
36 years and 333 days, Srečko Katanec ( Slovenia vs  Yugoslavia, 2000)[13]
Oldest coach
73 years and 93 days, Giovanni Trapattoni ( Republic of Ireland vs  Italy, 2012)[13]
Most championship wins as player and head coach
2, Berti Vogts,  Germany (1972 as non-playing squad member; 1996 as coach)
Most appearances as player and head coach
14, Morten Olsen,  Denmark (1984 & 1988 as player, 2004 & 2012 as coach); Frank Rijkaard,  Netherlands (1988 & 1992 as player, 2000 as coach)
Final appearances as both player and head coach
2, Dino Zoff,  Italy (1968 as player, 2000 as coach)

Refereeing[edit]

Most tournaments
3, Anders Frisk ( Sweden, 1996–2004), Kim Milton Nielsen ( Denmark, 1996–2004)
Most matches refereed, overall
8, Anders Frisk ( Sweden, 1996–2004)
Most matches refereed, one tournament
4, Anders Frisk ( Sweden, 2004), Roberto Rosetti ( Italy, 2008), Pedro Proença ( Portugal, 2012)

Discipline[edit]

Fastest sending off
24th minute, Éric Abidal ( France), vs  Italy, 2008
Latest sending off
117th minute, Nuno Gomes ( Portugal), vs  France, 2000
Most cards (all-time, player)
8, Giorgos Karagounis ( Greece, 2004–2012)[6]
Most cautions (all-time, player)
8, Giorgos Karagounis ( Greece, 2004–2012)[6]
Most sendings off (all-time, player)
2, Radoslav Látal ( Czech Republic, 1996 and 2000)
Most sendings off (tournament)
10 (in 31 games), 2000
Most sendings off (all-time, team)
3,  Czech Republic,  France,  Netherlands,  Russia and  Yugoslavia
Most sendings off (match, both teams)
3,  Czech Republic vs  Netherlands, 1976
Most sendings off (final match)
1, Yvon Le Roux,  France vs  Spain, 1984
Most cautions (tournament)
156 (in 31 matches), 2004.
Most cautions (match, both teams)
10, 4 ( Czech Republic) and 6 ( Germany), 1996 (first round);[14] 6 ( Czech Republic) and 4 ( Portugal), 1996;[15] 6 ( Italy) and 4 ( Netherlands), 2000[16]
Most cautions (final match, both teams)
6, 1 ( Denmark) and 5 ( Germany), 1992;[17] 4 ( Greece) and 2 ( Portugal), 2004[18]

Attendance[edit]

Highest in a Finals match & highest in a final
79,115,  Soviet Union vs  Spain, 21 June 1964, Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, Madrid, Spain, 1964
Lowest in a Finals match
3,869,  Hungary vs  Denmark, 20 June 1964, Camp Nou, Barcelona, Spain, 1964
Highest average attendance per match
59,847, 1968
Highest total attendance (tournament)
1,440,846, 2012
Lowest average attendance per match
19,740, 1960
Lowest total attendance (tournament)
78,958, 1960

Penalty shootouts[edit]

For more details, see a complete list of all penalty shoot-outs.

Most shootouts, team, all-time
4,  England,  Netherlands,  Spain
Most shootouts, team, tournament
2,  England, 1996;  France, 1996
Most shootouts, all teams, tournament
4, 1996
Most wins, team, all-time
3,  Czech Republic,  Spain
Most losses, team, all-time
3,  England,  Netherlands
Most shootouts with 100% record (all won)
3,  Czech Republic
Most shootouts with 0% record (all lost)
1,  Croatia,  Sweden
Most successful kicks, shootout, one team
9 (out of 9),  Czech Republic vs  Italy, 1980
Most successful kicks, shootout, both teams
17 (out of 18),  Czech Republic vs  Italy, 1980
Most successful kicks, team, all-time
20 (out of 20),  Czech Republic
Most successful kicks, player
2, Zinédine Zidane, Youri Djorkaeff, Bixente Lizarazu, Vincent Guérin, Laurent Blanc ( France, 1996); Alan Shearer, David Platt, Stuart Pearce, Paul Gascoigne ( England, 1996); Patrick Kluivert ( Netherlands, 1996–2000); Cesc Fàbregas ( Spain, 2008–2012)
Most kicks taken, shootout, both teams
18,  Czechoslovakia vs  Italy, 1980
Most kicks taken, team, all-time
20,  Czech Republic,  England,  Netherlands
Most kicks taken, team, one tournament
11,  France, 1996
Most kicks missed, shootout, both teams
4,  Italy vs  Netherlands 2000
Most kicks missed, team, all-time
6,  Netherlands (in 4 shootouts)
Fewest successful kicks, shootout, one team
1,  Netherlands vs  Italy, 2000;  Croatia vs  Turkey, 2008
Most saves, all-time
3, Iker Casillas ( Spain, 2008–2012)

All-time tables[edit]

Finals[edit]

Rank Ranking of teams based on total points
Team National team
Participations Number of Finals participations
Matches Total number of games played
W/D/L Win-Draw-Loss record
F/A Number of goals scored/conceded
Points Total points (3 for a win, 1 for a draw)
Points per match Average points per match
Rank
Team Participations Matches W D L F A Points Points per matches
01.  Germany[19] 11 43 23 10 10 65 45 79 1.84
02.  Spain 9 36 17 11 8 50 32 62 1.72
03.  Netherlands 9 35 17 8 10 57 37 59 1.69
04.  Italy 8 33 13 15 5 33 25 54 1.64
05.  France 8 32 15 8 9 49 39 53 1.66
06.  Portugal 6 28 15 5 8 40 26 50 1.79
07.  Czech Republic[20] 8 29 13 5 11 40 38 44 1.52
08.  Russia[21] 10 30 12 6 12 36 39 42 1.40
09.  England 8 27 9 9 9 36 31 36 1.33
10.  Denmark 8 27 7 6 14 30 43 27 1.00
11.  Croatia 4 14 6 4 4 18 16 22 1.57
12.  Sweden 5 17 5 5 7 24 21 20 1.18
13.  Greece 4 16 5 3 8 14 20 18 1.13
14.  Belgium 4 12 4 2 6 13 20 14 1.17
15.  Turkey 3 12 3 2 7 11 18 11 0.92
16.  Yugoslavia 5 14 3 2 9 22 39 11 0.79
17.  Scotland 2 6 2 1 3 04 05 07 1.17
18.  Romania 4 13 1 4 8 08 17 07 0.53
19.   Switzerland 3 9 1 2 6 05 13 05 0.56
20.  Norway 1 3 1 1 1 01 01 04 1.33
21.  Republic of Ireland 2 6 1 1 4 03 11 04 0.67
22.  Bulgaria 2 6 1 1 4 04 13 04 0.67
23.  Ukraine 1 3 1 0 2 02 04 03 1.00
24.  Hungary 2 4 1 0 3 05 06 03 0.75
25.  Poland 2 6 0 3 3 03 07 03 0.50
26.  Slovenia 1 3 0 2 1 04 05 02 0.67
27.  Austria 1 3 0 1 2 01 03 01 0.33
28.  Latvia 1 3 0 1 2 01 05 01 0.33

Qualifying matches[edit]

Rank Ranking of teams based on points per match
Team National team
Participations Number of participations
Matches Total number of games played
W/D/L Win-Draw-Loss record
F/A Number of goals scored/conceded
Points Total points (3 for a win, 1 for a draw)
Points per match Average points per match
Rank
Team Participations Matches W D L F A Points Points per matches
01.  Germany[19] 12 88 62 19 7 213 52 205 2.33
02.  Spain 14 105 72 16 17 260 83 232 2.21
03.  Croatia 5 52 34 11 7 98 34 113 2.17
04.  Netherlands 13 99 67 14 18 233 71 215 2.17
05.  Czech Republic[20] 14 106 69 20 17 219 77 227 2.14
06.  England 13 90 56 24 10 190 55 192 2.13
07.  Russia[22] 14 110 67 27 16 214 81 228 2.07
08.  Italy 13 98 57 27 14 171 65 198 2.02
09.  France 14 102 59 26 17 206 85 203 1.99
10.  Serbia[23] 13 96 53 24 19 178 96 183 1.91
11.  Portugal 14 99 54 24 21 183 96 186 1.88
12.  Romania 14 105 54 30 21 197 99 192 1.83
13.  Sweden 13 92 49 19 24 155 90 166 1.80
14.  Greece 14 100 51 20 29 152 109 173 1.73
15.  Scotland 12 100 48 23 29 144 107 167 1.67
16.  Denmark 14 105 50 22 33 174 130 172 1.64
17.  Belgium 13 94 42 24 28 146 107 150 1.60
18.  Bulgaria 14 103 46 24 33 148 108 162 1.57
19.  East Germany 8 46 20 12 14 76 57 72 1.57
20.  Poland 14 90 38 24 28 131 100 138 1.53
21.  Republic of Ireland 14 109 44 32 33 161 128 164 1.50
22.  Hungary 14 109 46 22 41 183 151 160 1.47
23.  Israel 5 50 21 10 19 80 64 73 1.46
24.  Ukraine 5 42 16 13 13 56 48 61 1.45
25.  Slovakia 5 50 21 9 20 77 69 72 1.44
26.   Switzerland 13 82 32 22 28 129 108 118 1.44
27.  Turkey 14 100 39 24 37 120 140 141 1.41
28.  Bosnia and Herzegovina 4 42 17 7 18 56 61 58 1.38
29.  Austria 14 90 36 16 38 162 142 124 1.38
30.  Slovenia 5 54 20 12 22 64 66 72 1.33
31.  Wales 13 94 35 18 41 114 129 123 1.31
32.  Latvia 5 52 20 8 24 61 69 68 1.31
33.  Norway 14 102 37 19 46 133 145 130 1.27
34.  Northern Ireland 13 100 34 22 44 104 130 124 1.24
35.  Lithuania 5 48 17 7 24 43 65 58 1.21
36.  Montenegro 1 10 3 3 4 7 10 12 1.20
37.  Finland 12 94 24 21 49 100 152 93 0.99
38.  Georgia 5 50 13 8 29 53 73 47 0.94
39.  Armenia 5 50 12 10 28 46 71 46 0.92
40.  Macedonia 5 48 10 13 25 53 72 43 0.90
41.  Belarus 5 48 11 10 27 41 73 43 0.90
42.  Moldova 5 48 11 7 30 47 98 40 0.83
43.  Estonia 5 52 12 7 33 43 94 43 0.83
44.  Iceland 11 86 18 15 53 64 140 69 0.80
45.  Albania 11 83 12 20 51 62 154 56 0.67
46.  Kazakhstan 2 24 3 5 16 17 45 14 0.58
47.  Cyprus 12 94 12 14 68 67 251 50 0.53
48.  Azerbaijan 5 50 5 6 39 29 129 21 0.42
49.  Liechtenstein 5 48 4 5 39 17 150 17 0.35
50.  Faroe Islands 6 58 4 6 48 34 165 18 0.31
51.  Luxembourg 13 99 6 9 84 38 276 27 0.27
52.  Malta 12 92 3 12 77 46 272 21 0.23
53.  Andorra 4 40 0 0 40 7 113 0 0.00
54.  San Marino 6 56 0 0 56 6 253 0 0.00

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/18666394
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Ionescu, Romeo (2008). The Complete Results and Line-ups of the European Football Championships 1958–2008. Cleethorpes: Soccer Books Limited. ISBN 978-1-86223-172-6. 
  3. ^ Spain failed to qualify for the Finals in 1968, but reached the quarter-final stage; Italy reached the same stage in 1972.
  4. ^ Excluding automatic qualification as host, as reigning champion, or by invitation.
  5. ^  Denmark (1984–2004) also played in six consecutive Finals tournaments for which they did not receive automatic qualification, but originally failed to qualify in 1992, and were invited to the tournament only after the disqualification of Yugoslavia.
  6. ^ a b c d e f http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2012/jul/02/facts-figures-euro-2012?newsfeed=true
  7. ^ http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/news/newsid=1812534.html
  8. ^ Tomasson also scored in a 3–3 draw against Sweden in 2007 which was subsequently struck from the record.
  9. ^ Defined as a player who played all matches for a team that reached the final or the third-place match, meaning their team played the maximum number of matches.
  10. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/feedarticle/10265174
  11. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/euro_2008/7363070.stm
  12. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/euro_2004/3787477.stm
  13. ^ a b http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/photos/other-galleries/gallery=1761830.html
  14. ^ http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=1996/statistics/round=227/matches/type=yellowcards/index.html
  15. ^ http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=1996/matches/round=223/match=52914/index.html
  16. ^ http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=2000/matches/round=1460/match=65184/index.html
  17. ^ http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=1992/matches/round=217/match=6098/index.html
  18. ^ http://www.uefa.com/uefaeuro/season=2004/matches/round=1623/match=1059194/index.html
  19. ^ a b includes results of  West Germany from 1972-88
  20. ^ a b includes results of  Czechoslovakia from 1960-80
  21. ^ includes results of  Soviet Union from 1960-88 and  CIS in 1992
  22. ^ includes results of  Soviet Union from 1960-92
  23. ^ includes results of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia/ Yugoslavia from 1960-1992 and in 2000, and  Serbia and Montenegro in 2004