List of UK top 12 singles in 1952

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1950s in music in the UK
Number-one singles
Number-one albums
Best-selling singles
Best-selling albums
Summaries and charts
1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954
1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959
1949 1960
Top 10/12 singles
1952, 1953, 1954
1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959
1960

The UK Singles Chart, compiled by the Official Charts Company, calculates the best-selling record singles of the week in the United Kingdom.[1] New Musical Express (NME) magazine published the United Kingdom record charts for the first time in 1952.[2][3][4] NME originally published only a top 12 (although the first chart had a couple of songs that were tied so a top 15 was announced) but this was gradually extended to encompass a top 20 by October 1954.[5][6][7] Songs that entered the top 12 in 1952 but did not peak until 1953 are included in the table, as well as in List of top 12 singles in 1953 (UK).

Eighteen songs reached their peak in 1952. "Because You're Mine" was recorded by Nat King Cole and Mario Lanza and both versions reached the top 10. Additionally, five songs entered the charts in 1952 but did not peak until 1953. The first song to reach number-one in the United Kingdom was "Here in My Heart" by Al Martino; the song debuted at the top of the charts on 9 November 1952 and spent nine consecutive weeks in that position.[5][8]

American Bing Crosby and British singer Vera Lynn shared the record for most top 12 hits in 1952, both achieving three. One of Crosby's songs, "Zing a Little Zong", was a collaboration with Jane Wyman. This was one of three collaborations to record hit singles in 1952; the others were Doris Day and Frankie Laine ("Sugar Bush", which peaked at number 8), and Johnnie Ray and The Four Lads ("Faith Can Move Mountains", which reached number 7). Lynn had three songs—"The Homing Waltz", "Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart" and "Forget Me Not"—in the chart at the same time.

Top 12 singles[edit]

Al Martino (pictured in 2005) spent nine consecutive weeks at number-one with "Here in My Heart".
Kay Starr (pictured in 1999) entered the chart in 1952 with Comes A-Long A-Love. The song rose to a peak of number one in January 1953.

Key

Symbol Meaning
Single released in 1952 but peaked in 1953.
Entered The date that the song first appeared in the chart.
Peak Highest position that the song reached in the UK Singles Chart.

The table is sorted by the date the song entered the chart, then by the date the song reached its peak position in the chart.

Entered[A] Weeks in top 12 Single Artist Peak Peak reached[A] Weeks at number 1
9 November 7 "High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me)" Laine, FrankieFrankie Laine 7 9 November 0
9 November 8[B] "Sugar Bush" Day, DorisDoris Day and Frankie Laine 8 9 November 0
9 November 4[B] "Blue Tango" Martin, RayRay Martin 8 9 November 0
9 November 3 "The Homing Waltz" Lynn, VeraVera Lynn 9 9 November 0
9 November 1 "Auf Wiederseh'n Sweetheart" Lynn, VeraVera Lynn 10 9 November 0
9 November 1 "Walkin' My Baby Back Home" Ray, JohnnieJohnnie Ray 12 9 November 0
9 November 18 "Here in My Heart" Martino, AlAl Martino 1 16 November 9
9 November 7 "Somewhere Along the Way" Cole, Nat KingNat King Cole 3 16 November 0
9 November 10 "Feet Up" Mitchell, GuyGuy Mitchell 2 16 November 0
9 November 9 "Half as Much" Clooney, RosemaryRosemary Clooney 3 16 November 0
9 November 24 "Because You're Mine" Lanza, MarioMario Lanza 3 30 November 0
9 November 6[B] "Forget Me Not" Lynn, VeraVera Lynn 5 7 December 0
9 November 12 "Isle of Innisfree" Crosby, BingBing Crosby 3 7 December 0
9 November 19 "You Belong to Me"♦ Stafford, JoJo Stafford 1 11 January 1
9 November 8[C] "Cowpuncher's Cantata"♦ Bygraves, MaxMax Bygraves 6 18 January 0
16 November 1 "Take My Heart" Martino, AlAl Martino 9 16 November 0
16 November 2 "My Love and Devotion" Day, DorisDoris Day 10 23 November 0
30 November 2 "Zing a Little Zong" Crosby, BingBing Crosby and Jane Wyman 10 30 November 0
30 November 16 "Comes A-Long A-Love"♦ Starr, KayKay Starr 1 18 January 1
7 December 6[B] "Britannia Rag"♦ Atwell, WinifredWinifred Atwell 5 18 January 0
14 December 3 "White Christmas" Mantovani 6 14 December 0
14 December 3 "Because You're Mine" Cole, Nat KingNat King Cole 6 14 December 0
14 December 3[B] "Faith Can Move Mountains" Ray, JohnnieJohnnie Ray and The Four Lads 7 14 December 0
14 December 2 "Silent Night, Holy Night" Crosby, BingBing Crosby 8 14 December 0
14 December 2 "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" Stafford, JoJo Stafford 11 14 December 0
14 December 4[B] "Walkin' to Missouri"♦ Brent, TonyTony Brent 7 4 January 0
14 December 10 "Takes Two to Tango"♦ Armstrong, LouisLouis Armstrong 6 18 January 0

Notes

  • A The dates are for when the song charted, which is six days before the published "Week ending" date.
  • B Re-entered the chart on one occasion.
  • C Re-entered the chart three times in early 1953.

Entries by artist[edit]

Vera Lynn (pictured in 1973) and Bing Crosby both had three top 12 singles in 1952.
Artist Number of top 12 singles
Crosby, BingBing Crosby 3
Lynn, VeraVera Lynn 3
Cole, Nat KingNat King Cole 2
Day, DorisDoris Day 2
Laine, FrankieFrankie Laine 2
Martino, AlAl Martino 2
Ray, JohnnieJohnnie Ray 2
Stafford, JoJo Stafford 2[D]

Notes

  • D Figure includes song that peaked in 1953.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ "The Official UK Charts Company". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 2 January 2010. 
  2. ^ "The Story of the Single". BBC News. British Broadcasting Corporation. 23 March 2001. Retrieved 19 May 2010. 
  3. ^ "'The Godfather' singer Al Martino dies". New Musical Express. 14 October 2009. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  4. ^ "Key dates in the history of the Official UK Charts (archived)". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 10 January 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Top 10 chart starts to sound a little off-key". Yorkshire Post. 17 January 2005. Retrieved 19 May 2010. 
  6. ^ "First ever top 12: 14 November 1952". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 10 January 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  7. ^ "First ever top 20: 01 October 1954". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 10 January 2008. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  8. ^ "Announcing the first record Hit Parade". New Musical Express. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 

External links[edit]