List of Union Army officers educated at the United States Military Academy

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United States flag with 35 stars
United States flag with 35 stars, as it appeared after the admission of West Virginia in 1863 until the end of the American Civil War in 1865

The United States Military Academy (USMA) is an undergraduate college in West Point, New York that educates and commissions officers for the United States Army during the American Civil War. This list is drawn from alumni of the Military Academy who served as general officers in the Union Army (US Army). This includes William Tecumseh Sherman (class of 1840), Abner Doubleday (class of 1842), Ulysses S. Grant (class of 1843), George Crook (class of 1852), Philip Sheridan (class of 1853). This also includes six recipients of the Medal of Honor: Rufus Saxton (class of 1849), Eugene Asa Carr (class of 1850), John Schofield (class of 1853), Oliver O. Howard (class of 1854), Alexander S. Webb (class of 1855), and Adelbert Ames (class of 1861).a[›]

Union Army officers[edit]

Note: "Class year" refers to the class year of each alumnus, which usually is the same year the person graduated. However, in times of war, classes often graduate early.
'ex' after the class year indicates the alumnus is a non-graduating member of that class.
Name Class year Notability References
Totten, Joseph GilbertJoseph Gilbert Totten 1805 Major General; War of 1812, Mexican–American War; military and lighthouse engineer; Chief of Engineers (1838–1864) b[›][1]
Bomford, GeorgeGeorge Bomford 1805 Brigadier General; Chief of Ordnance (1832–1848). b[›][2]
Loomis, GustavusGustavus Loomis 1811 Brigadier General; Black Hawk War, Third Seminole War; Superintendent of general recruiting during the American Civil War b[›][3]
Hitchcock, Ethan A.Ethan A. Hitchcock 1817 Major General; grandson of Ethan Allen; commandant of cadets at the Academy (1829–1833); Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; held several assignments in the War Department during the American Civil War; writer on alchemy and Jungian psychology; collector of flute music b[›][4]
Delafield, RichardRichard Delafield 1818 Major General; 7th, 11th, and 13th Superintendent of the Academy (1838–1845), (1856–1861), (1861); in charge of New York Harbor defenses (1861–64); Chief of Engineers (1864–1866) b[›][1]
Abercrombie, John JosephJohn Joseph Abercrombie 1822 Brigadier General; Black Hawk War, Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; colonel 7th U.S. Infantry, Battle of Falling Waters, commander 2nd Brigade, I Corps, Army of the Potomac, Peninsula Campaign, wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Malvern Hill, assigned to defenses of Washington, DC and various supply depots during the Overland Campaign, retired from active duty June 12, 1865. b[›][5]
Hunter, DavidDavid Hunter 1822 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; First Battle of Bull Run, commander of the Union Army of the Shenandoah; emancipated slaves in three states, which was rescinded, prior to the Emancipation Proclamation, president of the military commission trying the conspirators involved with the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. b[›][6]
Mansfield, Joseph K.Joseph K. Mansfield 1822 Major General; Mexican–American War; civil engineer; mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam; Fort Mansfield, a coastal artillery installation in Westerly, Rhode Island named in his honor b[›][7]
McCall, George A.George A. McCall 1822 Brigadier General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; wounded and captured at Battle of Glendale, later released in a prisoner exchange b[›][8]
Wright, GeorgeGeorge Wright 1822 Brigadier General; Second Seminole War, Yakima War, Mexican–American War; commander of the Department of the Pacific during the Civil War b[›][9]
Greene, George S.George S. Greene 1823 Brigadier General; second cousin of General Nathanael Greene of the American Revolutionary War; railroad and aqueduct engineer, founder of American Society of Civil Engineers and Architects; defender of Culp's Hill during the Battle of Gettysburg b[›][10]
Thomas, LorenzoLorenzo Thomas 1823 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; Adjutant General of the U.S. Army; U.S. Secretary of War; Camp Thomas was named for him b[›][11]
Anderson, RobertRobert Anderson 1825 Major General; Black Hawk War, Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; commander of Fort Sumter at the start of the war b[›][12]
Smith, Charles FergusonCharles Ferguson Smith 1825 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Fort Donelson, injured his leg in a rowing accident and subsequently died of infection in 1862 b[›]
Casey, SilasSilas Casey 1826 Major General; Second Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War, Pig War; Battle of Seven Pines; father of Brigadier General Thomas Lincoln Casey, Jr. b[›][13]
Heintzelman, Samuel P.Samuel P. Heintzelman 1826 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War, Cortina Troubles; First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Second Battle of Bull Run; commander of III Corps and XXII Corps of the Army of the Potomac b[›][14]
Buford, Napoleon BonaparteNapoleon Bonaparte Buford 1827 Major General; Battle of Belmont, Battle of Island Number Ten, Siege of Corinth; brother of Major General John Buford; cousin of Confederate States Brigadier General Abraham Buford II b[›][15]
Cooke, Philip St. GeorgePhilip St. George Cooke 1827 Major General; Black Hawk War, Mexican–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Williamsburg, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of White Oak Swamp; father of Confederate States Brigadier General John Rogers Cooke; father-in-law of Confederate States Major General J.E.B. Stuart b[›][16]
Barnes, JamesJames Barnes 1829 Major General; railroad engineer; Battle of Shepherdstown, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg b[›][17]
Mitchel, Ormsby M.Ormsby M. Mitchel 1829 Major General; Great Locomotive Chase; commander of X Corps; Mitchell, Indiana and Fort Mitchell, Kentucky are named for him b[›][18]
Buchanan, Robert C.Robert C. Buchanan 1830 Brigadier General; Black Hawk War, Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Glendale, Battle of Malvern Hill, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Fredericksburg; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac and V Corps; commander of the 1st Infantry Regiment and Fort Porter b[›][19]
Ammen, JacobJacob Ammen 1831 Brigadier General; Battle of Cheat Mountain, Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Saltville I; brigade commander in the Army of Ohio and division commander in the XXII Corps; brother of Navy Rear Admiral Daniel Ammen b[›][20]
Curtis, Samuel RyanSamuel Ryan Curtis 1831 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Pea Ridge, Battle of Westport; commander of the Army of the Southwest and Army of the Border; U.S. Representative from Iowa b[›][21]
Humphreys, Andrew A.Andrew A. Humphreys 1831 Major General; Seminole Wars; Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Bristoe Campaign, Battle of Mine Run, Overland Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of Sayler's Creek; division commander in the III Corps; commander of the V Corps and II Corps; Chief of Engineers (1866–1875) b[›][22]
Van Cleve, Horatio P.Horatio P. Van Cleve 1831 Major General; Battle of Mill Springs, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Perryville, Battle of Stones River, Battle of Chickamauga b[›][23]
Keyes, Erasmus D.Erasmus D. Keyes 1832 Major General; Puget Sound War, Spokane – Coeur d'Alene – Paloos War, Battle of Four Lakes; commander of the IV Corps of the Union Army of the Potomac during the first half of the American Civil War, First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Malvern Hill, Gettysburg Campaign, resigned in May 1864 after being relieved of command due to retreating in combat b[›][24]
Marcy, Randolph B.Randolph B. Marcy 1832 Brigadier General; Inspector General of the U.S. Army; father-in-law of New Jersey Governor and Major General George B. McClellan b[›][25]
Bomford, James VoteJames Vote Bomford 1832 Brigadier General; Chief of Ordnance (1832–1848) b[›][2]
Alvord, BenjaminBenjamin Alvord 1833 Brigadier General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; commander of the District of Oregon; father of Brigadier General Benjamin Alvord, Jr.; the Alvord Desert is named after him b[›][26]
King, RufusRufus King 1833 Brigadier General; division commander in the Iron Brigade; U.S. Minister to the Papal States; grandson of U.S. Senator Rufus King; father of Medal of Honor recipient Rufus King, Jr. and Brigadier General Charles King b[›][27]
Morris, Thomas A.Thomas A. Morris 1834 Brigadier General, Indiana State Volunteers [28]
Pope, CurranCurran Pope 1834 Colonel; commanding officer of the 15th Kentucky Infantry; wounded in action at the Battle of Perryville after assuming command of the 17th Brigade, Third Division, I Corps, Army of the Ohio; died November 6, 1862 of typhoid fever while recovering from his wound [28]
Miller, Morris S.Morris S. Miller 1834 Brevet Brigadier General; Seminole Wars; Mexican–American War; Aroostook War; Quartermaster of Washington, D.C., 1861–1864; Board for the Examination of Quartermasters in the Department of Arkansas and the Department of the Gulf, 1864–1865 [28]
Paul, Gabriel RenéGabriel René Paul 1834 Brigadier General; Seminole Wars; Mexican–American War; brigade commander, I Corps, Army of the Potomac; Battle of Chancellorsville; seriously wounded and blinded in action on the first day at the Battle of Gettysburg [28]
Fry, Cary H.Cary H. Fry 1834 Brevet Lieutenant Colonel; physician; Mexican–American War; Paymaster, Washington, D.C., 1861–1863; Acting Paymaster-General, 1862; Chief Paymaster, District of Washington, D.C., 1863; Paymaster, San Francisco, California, 1863–1867 [28]
Simmons, Seneca G.Seneca G. Simmons 1834 Colonel; Seminole Wars; commanding officer, 34th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry [5th Pennsylvania Reserves]; killed in action at the Battle of Glendale while in command of 1st Brigade, Third Division, V Corps, Army of the Potomac [28]
Coburn, Joseph L.Joseph L. Coburn 1834 Captain; civilian employee of the Subsistence Department, Perryville, Maryland, 1861–1862; civilian employee Quartermaster Department, Chicago, Illinois, 1863–1864; reappointed captain in the U.S. Volunteers, 1864, serving at Chicago until 1865 [28]
Smith, Richard S.Richard S. Smith 1834 Major; served as a teacher of drawing at the U.S. Military Academy, 1840–1855; major, 12th U.S. Infantry; commanded the regiment at the Battle of Chancellorsville; resigned May 30, 1863 to accept appointment as president of Girard College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [28]
Ketchum, William ScottWilliam Scott Ketchum 1834 Brevet (military) Major General; Seminole Wars; Bleeding Kansas; served in various assignments including acting inspector general, Department of the Missouri and Department of the Mississippi, organizing Pennsylvania volunteers, Paymaster Department, and Quartermaster Department [28]
Montgomery, AlexanderAlexander Montgomery 1834 Major; Seminole Wars; Quartermaster at Indianapolis, Indiana, 1861–1862; Quartermaster at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1862–1863; Mustering Out officer at Cleveland and Cincinnati, Ohio, 1864–1865 [28]
Eaton, Joseph HoraceJoseph Horace Eaton 1835 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War; artist; assistant Union Army paymaster during the American Civil War b[›][29]
Haupt, HermanHerman Haupt 1835 Brigadier General; Northern Virginia Campaign, Maryland Campaign, Gettysburg Campaign; commander of United States Military Railroad b[›][30]
Martindale, John H.John H. Martindale 1835 Major General; Battle of Malvern Hill, Bermuda Hundred Campaign, Battle of Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg; Military Governor of Washington, D.C.; Attorney General of New York; son of U.S. Representative Henry C. Martindale b[›][31]
Meade, GeorgeGeorge Meade 1835 Major General; civil and lighthouse engineer; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Appomattox Campaign, defeated Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg, commander Army of the Potomac (1863–1865); Fort George G. Meade in Maryland, home of the National Security Agency named in his honor b[›][32]
Naglee, Henry MorrisHenry Morris Naglee 1835 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Seven Pines; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac; commander of the VII Corps; Naglee Park in San Jose, California is named for him b[›][33]
Patrick, Marsena R.Marsena R. Patrick 1835 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Gettysburg; brigade commander in the I Corps; Military Governor of Fredericksburg, Virginia b[›][34]
Roberts, Benjamin S.Benjamin S. Roberts 1835 Major General; Mexican–American War, Indian Wars; Battle of Valverde, Battle of Cedar Mountain, Second Battle of Rappahannock Station, Second Battle of Bull Run; division commander in the VIII Corps and XIX Corps b[›][35]
Allen, RobertRobert Allen 1836 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War; Vicksburg Campaign, Atlanta Campaign b[›][36]
Meigs, Montgomery C.Montgomery C. Meigs 1836 Major General; Battle of Fredericksburg; Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army b[›][37]
Phelps, John W.John W. Phelps 1836 Brigadier General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War, Utah War; Battle of Forts Jackson and St. Philip; commander of the 1st Vermont Infantry; candidate for President of the United States b[›][38]
Woodbury, Daniel PhineasDaniel Phineas Woodbury 1836 Brigadier General; First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Northern Virginia Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg; superintended the construction of Fort Kearny and Fort Laramie b[›][39]
Dyer, Alexander BrydieAlexander Brydie Dyer 1837 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; commander of the Springfield Armory b[›][40]
French, William H.William H. French 1837 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; brigade commander at Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Oak Grove, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Garnett's & Golding's Farm, Battle of Savage's Station, Battle of Glendale, Battle of Malvern Hill, division commander in Northern Virginia Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Mine Run; commander of VIII Corps and III Corps; commander of Fort McDowell and Fort McHenry b[›][41]
Hooker, JosephJoseph Hooker 1837 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; Battle of Williamsburg, Seven Days Battles, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga Campaign, Atlanta Campaign; commander of I Corps, V Corps, and XX Corps; commander of the Army of the Potomac; brother-in-law of U.S. Representative William S. Groesbeck b[›][42]
Sedgwick, JohnJohn Sedgwick 1837 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War, Utah War, Indian Wars; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Seven Pines, wounded at the Battle of Glendale and Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Salem Church, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of the Wilderness, killed at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House; division commander in the Army of the Potomac; commander of the II Corps, IX Corps, and VI Corps b[›][43]
Smith Todd, John BlairJohn Blair Smith Todd 1837 Brigadier General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; U.S. Congressional Delegate from the Dakota Territory; cousin by marriage of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln and Confederate States Brigadier General Benjamin Hardin Helm; Todd County, South Dakota and Todd County, Minnesota are named for him b[›][44]
Board, BucknerBuckner Board 1838 Colonel; Seminole Wars; colonel 2nd Kentucky Cavalry, resigned December 25, 1862 b[›][28]
Granger, Robert S.Robert S. Granger 1838 Brigadier General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; commander of Districts of Nashville, Middle Tennessee, and Northern Alabama b[›][45]
McDowell, IrvinIrvin McDowell 1838 Major General; Mexican–American War; defeated at First Battle of Bull Run b[›][46]
Smith, Andrew JacksonAndrew Jackson Smith 1838 Major General; Mexican–American War, Indian Wars; Vicksburg Campaign, Red River Campaign, Battle of Tupelo, Battle of Nashville b[›][47]
Canby, EdwardEdward Canby 1839 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War, Utah War, Navajo War of 1860, Modoc War; Battle of Valverde, Battle of Glorieta Pass, Battle of Peralta, Battle of Spanish Fort, Battle of Fort Blakely; commander of Fort Defiance; commander of the Second Military District and Fifth Military District; Canby, Oregon, Canby, Minnesota, and Canby, California are named for him b[›][48]
Halleck, Henry WagerHenry Wager Halleck 1839 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth; General-in-Chief of the Union Army; Army Chief of Staff; grandson-in-law of U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton; brother-in-law of Major General Schuyler Hamilton b[›][49]
Hunt, Henry JacksonHenry Jackson Hunt 1839 Major General; Mexican–American War, Utah War; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Malvern Hill, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg, Siege of Petersburg b[›][50]
Ord, EdwardEdward Ord 1839 Major General; Indian Wars; Battle of Dranesville, Battle of Hatchie's Bridge, Siege of Vicksburg, Third Battle of Petersburg; commander of the XIII Corps; commander of the Army of the James; commander of the Fourth Military District b[›][51]
Stevens, IsaacIsaac Stevens 1839 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Fort Pulaski, Battle of James Island, Second Battle of Bull Run, killed at the Battle of Chantilly; U.S. Congressional Delegate from the Washington Territory; father of Brigadier General and Medal of Honor recipient Hazard Stevens; Fort Stevens in Washington, D.C. and Fort Stevens in Oregon were named for him b[›][52]
Getty, George W.George W. Getty 1840 Major General; Mexican–American War, Seminole Wars; Peninsula Campaign, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Gettysburg Campaign, wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness, Siege of Petersburg, Valley Campaigns of 1864; division commander in the Army of the Potomac b[›][53]
Hays, WilliamWilliam Hays 1840 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War, Seminole Wars; Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, wounded and taken prisoner at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg; brigade commander in the II Corps; commander of the II Corps b[›][54]
Sherman, William TecumsehWilliam Tecumseh Sherman 1840 Major General; Battle of Shiloh, Vicksburg Campaign, Chattanooga Campaign, Atlanta Campaign, Carolinas Campaign, led the brutal Savannah Campaign (March to the Sea) from Atlanta to Savannah that demoralized the South; Commanding General of the United States Army (1869–1883) b[›][55]
Thomas, George HenryGeorge Henry Thomas 1840 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Mill Springs, Battle of Perryville, Battle of Stones River, Battle of Chickamauga, Battle of Missionary Ridge, Battle of Nashville; division commander in the Army of the Ohio; commander of the Army of the Cumberland; Fort Thomas, Kentucky is named for him b[›][56]
Van Vliet, StewartStewart Van Vliet 1840 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War, Utah War; chief quartermaster of the Army of the Potomac, quartermaster in New York City b[›][57]
Brannan, John MiltonJohn Milton Brannan 1841 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Saint John's Bluff, Tullahoma Campaign, Chickamauga Campaign, Battle of Missionary Ridge, Battle of Resaca, Battle of Dallas, Battle of Kennesaw Mountain b[›][58]
Brooks, William T. H.William T. H. Brooks 1841 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; Peninsula Campaign, wounded at the Battle of Savage's Station, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg; brigade commander in the IV Corps and VI Corps; commander of the Department of the Monongahela; division commander in the XVIII Corps b[›][59]
Buell, Don CarlosDon Carlos Buell 1841 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Perryville; commander of the Army of the Ohio; first cousin of Brigadier General George P. Buell b[›][60]
Howe, Albion P.Albion P. Howe 1841 Major General; Mexican–American War; Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg, relieved of division level command after Gettysburg, served in the honor guard that stood watch over the corpse of Abraham Lincoln, member of the military commission that tried the Lincoln conspirators b[›][61]
Lyon, NathanielNathaniel Lyon 1841 Brigadier General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War, Bloody Island Massacre; involved in early battles in Missouri, first Union general killed in the American Civil War, at Battle of Wilson's Creek b[›][62]
Reynolds, John F.John F. Reynolds 1841 Major General; Mexican–American War; Seven Days Battles, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, killed at the very start of the Battle of Gettysburg; brother of Rear Admiral Will Reynolds b[›][63]
Richardson, Israel B.Israel B. Richardson 1841 Major General; Second Seminole War, Mexican–American War; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Seven Pines, Seven Days Battles, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of South Mountain, mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam; descendant of Major General Israel Putnam; Fort Richardson was named for him b[›][64]
Wright, HoratioHoratio Wright 1841 Major General; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Gettysburg, Mine Run Campaign, Overland Campaign, Valley Campaigns of 1864, Siege of Petersburg, Appomattox Campaign, commander of the VI Corps of the Army of the Potomac (1864–1865); Chief of Engineers (1879–1884) b[›][1]
Couch, Darius N.Darius N. Couch 1842 Brigadier General; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Williamsburg, Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Oak Grove, Battle of Malvern Hill, Maryland Campaign, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg Campaign, Franklin-Nashville Campaign, Carolinas Campaign; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac; division commander in the VI Corps and XXIII Corps; commander of the II Corps; commander of the Department of the Susquehanna b[›][65]
Doubleday, AbnerAbner Doubleday 1842 Major General; Mexican–American War, Indian Wars; Peninsula Campaign, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg, Valley Campaigns of 1864; division commander in the Army of the Potomac; brigade commander in the III Corps; division commander in the I Corps; the Navy vessel SS Abner Doubleday was named for him; the Auburn Doubledays are named for him; Doubleday Field is named for him b[›][66]
Newton, JohnJohn Newton 1842 Brigadier General; Utah War; coastal fortifications engineer; I Corps commander, Peninsula Campaign, Maryland Campaign, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg; Chief of Engineers (1884–1886); Commissioner of Public Works, New York City (1886–88); President, Panama Railroad Company (1888–95) b[›][1]
Pope, JohnJohn Pope 1842 Major General; topographic engineer and surveyor; Dakota War of 1862, Apache Wars; defeated at the Second Battle of Bull Run, commander of Army of the Mississippi and Army of Virginia b[›][67]
Rosecrans, WilliamWilliam Rosecrans 1842 Major General; commander Army of the Cumberland, Battle of Stones River, Tullahoma Campaign, Battle of Chickamauga; U.S. Minister to Mexico (1868–1969); U.S. Representative from California (1881–1885); Register of the Treasury (1885–1893) b[›][68]
Sykes, GeorgeGeorge Sykes 1842 Major General; Seminole Wars, Mexican–American War; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Mine Run Campaign; battalion commander in the 14th Infantry Regiment; division commander in the V Corps; commander of the V Corps b[›][69]
Augur, Christopher C.Christopher C. Augur 1843 Major General; Mexican–American War; wounded at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, Siege of Port Hudson; division commander in the Army of the Gulf; commander of the XII Corps; commander of the Department of the Platte; Camp Augur was named for him b[›][70]
Franklin, William B.William B. Franklin 1843 Major General; Mexican–American War; Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Gettysburg Campaign, wounded at the Battle of Mansfield; great-grandson of Continental Congressional Delegate Samuel Rhoads b[›][71]
Grant, Ulysses S.Ulysses S. Grant 1843 General of the Army of the United States; Mexican–American War; Siege of Vicksburg, Chattanooga Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, accepted Confederate surrender at Appomattox Court House; 18th President of the United States (1869–1877) b[›][72]
Hamilton, Charles SmithCharles Smith Hamilton 1843 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Iuka, Second Battle of Corinth; division commander in the Army of the Potomac and the III Corps b[›][73]
Ingalls, RufusRufus Ingalls 1843 Major General; Mexican–American War; Peninsula Campaign, Northern Virginia Campaign, Maryland Campaign; Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army b[›][74]
Judah, Henry M.Henry M. Judah 1843 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Buffington Island, Battle of Resaca; division commander in the XXIII Corps b[›][75]
Peck, John J.John J. Peck 1843 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Williamsburg, Battle of Fair Oaks, Seven Days Battles, Battle of Malvern Hill, Battle of Hill's Point; brigade commander in the IV Corps b[›][76]
Hancock, Winfield ScottWinfield Scott Hancock 1844 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, led the Army of the Potomac; Democratic Party nominee for President (1880) b[›][77]
Hays, AlexanderAlexander Hays 1844 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Williamsburg, Battle of Seven Pines, Battle of Savage's Station, Battle of Malvern Hill, Seven Days Battles, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Harpers Ferry, Battle of Gettysburg, Bristoe Campaign, Battle of Mine Run, killed at the Battle of the Wilderness; brigade commander in the XXII Corps and II Corps; son of U.S. Representative Samuel Hays; Fort Hays was named for him b[›][78]
Pleasonton, AlfredAlfred Pleasonton 1844 Major General; Peninsula Campaign, wounded at the Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Brandy Station, Battle of Byram's Ford, Battle of Marais des Cygnes; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac; Internal Revenue Service Commissioner; Pleasanton, California and Pleasanton, Kansas are named for him b[›][79]
Granger, GordonGordon Granger 1845 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Wilson's Creek, Battle of Island Number Ten, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Chickamauga, Chattanooga Campaign, Battle of Mobile Bay, Battle of Fort Blakely; division commander in the Army of the Mississippi; commander of the Army of Kentucky; commander of the IV Corps and XIII Corps b[›][80]
Hatch, John PorterJohn Porter Hatch 1845 Major General; fought in the Mexican War where he was breveted twice for bravery in battle; awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery at the Battle of South Mountain during the Maryland Campaign where he was wounded and had two mounts shot from underneath him; later served on the western frontier; retired to New York City and was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1893 b[›][81][82]
Porter, Fitz JohnFitz John Porter 1845 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Malvern Hill, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Antietam; division commander in the Army of the Potomac; nephew of Navy Commodore David Porter; cousin of Navy Commodore William D. Porter and Navy Admirals David Dixon Porter and David Farragut b[›][83]
Russell, David AllenDavid Allen Russell 1845 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War, Rogue River Wars, Yakima War; Seven Days Battles, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Overland Campaign, killed at the Battle of Opequon; son of U.S. Representative David Abel Russell; Fort D.A. Russell was named for him b[›][84]
Smith, William FarrarWilliam Farrar Smith 1845 Major General; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of White Oak Swamp, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Gettysburg Campaign, Battle of Wauhatchie, Battle of Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg; commander of the VI Corps and XVIII Corps; U.S. Consul in Guaymas, Mexico; cousin of Vermont Governor J. Gregory Smith b[›][85]
Stone, Charles PomeroyCharles Pomeroy Stone 1845 Brigadier General; Lieutenant General in the Egyptian Army; Mexican–American War; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Ball's Bluff, Siege of Petersburg; division and brigade commander in the Union Army of the Shenandoah b[›][86]
Wood, Thomas J.Thomas J. Wood 1845 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Shiloh, wounded at the Battle of Stones River, Battle of Chickamauga, Battle of Missionary Ridge, wounded at the Battle of Lovejoy's Station, Battle of Nashville; division commander in the Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland; commander of the IV Corps b[›][87]
Gilbert, Charles ChampionCharles Champion Gilbert 1846 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Wilson's Creek, Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Perryville, Battle of Franklin; commander of the Army of Kentucky b[›][88]
Gordon, George HenryGeorge Henry Gordon 1846 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Antietam; brigade commander in the XII Corps; division commander in the XII Corp and XI Corps b[›][89]
McClellan, George B.George B. McClellan 1846 Major General; developed the McClellan Saddle; organized the Army of the Potomac after the Union forces were defeated at First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam; son George B. McClellan, Jr. served as United States Representative from New York (1895–1903) and as Mayor of New York City (1904–1909) b[›][90]
Palmer, Innis N.Innis N. Palmer 1846 Major General; Mexican–American War; Indian Wars; First Battle of Bull Run, Seven Days Battles, Battle of Wyse Fork; grandfather of Major General Innis P. Swift b[›][91]
Reno, Jesse L.Jesse L. Reno 1846 Major General; Mexican–American War; Burnside's North Carolina Expedition, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Chantilly, killed at the Battle of South Mountain; Fort Reno in Oklahoma and Fort Reno in Wyoming were named for him; Reno, Nevada is named for him; Reno County, Kansas is named for him b[›][92]
Seymour, TrumanTruman Seymour 1846 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War, Third Seminole War; Battle of Fort Sumter, Battle of Beaver Dam Creek, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Glendale, Battle of Malvern Hill. Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Olustee, Battle of the Wilderness, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of Sayler's Creek, Appomattox Campaign; commander of Camp Curtin; brigade commander in the VI Corps; division commander in the VI Corps; commander of Fort Warren and Fort Preble b[›][93]
Stoneman, GeorgeGeorge Stoneman 1846 Major General; Seven Days Battles, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Atlanta Campaign; commander of Fort Brown; division commander in the II Corps and III Corps; corps commander in the Army of the Ohio; Governor of California; Camp Stoneman was named for him b[›][94]
Sturgis, Samuel D.Samuel D. Sturgis 1846 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Wilson's Creek, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Dandridge, Battle of Fair Garden, Battle of Brice's Crossroads; division commander in the IX Corps; grandfather of Lieutenant General Samuel D. Sturgis, Jr.; the Navy vessel USS General S. D. Sturgis (AP-137) was named for him; Sturgis, South Dakota is named for him b[›][95]
Ayres, Romeyn B.Romeyn B. Ayres 1847 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Blackburn's Ford, First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Seven Days Battles, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Overland Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, Appomattox Campaign; brigade commander in the V Corps b[›][96]
Burnside, AmbroseAmbrose Burnside 1847 Major General; Mexican–American War; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Roanoke Island, Battle of New Bern, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Campbell's Station, Battle of Fort Sanders, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater; commander of the First Regiment Rhode Island U.S. Volunteers; commander of the I Corps and IX Corps; commander of the Army of the Potomac; commander of the Department of the Ohio; U.S. Senator from Rhode Island; Governor of Rhode Island b[›][97]
Foster, John G.John G. Foster 1847 Major General; Mexican–American War; Battle of Fort Sumter, Battle of Roanoke Island, Battle of New Bern, Battle of Fort Macon, Battle of Washington, Battle of Kinston, Battle of White Hall, Battle of Goldsboro Bridge, Second Battle of Charleston Harbor, Knoxville Campaign, Sherman's March to the Sea; commander of the Department of the Ohio and the Army of the Ohio b[›][98]
Fry, James BarnetJames Barnet Fry 1847 Major General; Mexican–American War; Provost Marshal General; Adjutant General of the U.S. Army b[›][99]
Gibbon, JohnJohn Gibbon 1847 Major General; Mexican–American War, Seminole Wars, Great Sioux War of 1876–77, Nez Perce War; Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Second Battle of Fredericksburg, wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of Cold Harbor, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of Appomattox Court House; commander of the Iron Brigade; division commander in the I Corps and II Corps; commander of XVIII Corps and XXIV Corps; commander of the Department of the Platte; cousin of Confederate States Brigadier General J. Johnston Pettigrew; Gibbon, Minnesota is named for him b[›][100]
Griffin, CharlesCharles Griffin 1847 Major General; Mexican–American War; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Malvern Hill, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Mine Run, Overland Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of Five Forks; division commander in the V Corps; commander of the V Corps; Fort Griffin was named for him b[›][101]
Viele, Egbert LudovicusEgbert Ludovicus Viele 1847 Brigadier General; Mexican–American War; served at siege of Fort Pulaski and was appointed Military Governor of Norfolk, Virginia, resigned in 1863 to engage in civil engineering; created the Viele Map of New York City; U.S. Representative from New York (1885–1887) b[›][102]
Willcox, Orlando B.Orlando B. Willcox 1847 Major General; awarded the Medal of Honor in 1895 for gallantry at the First Battle of Bull Run where he was captured; later released as part of a prisoner exchange and served in the Virginia and North Carolina theaters at the end of the war b[›][103][104]
Buford, JohnJohn Buford 1848 Major General; Bleeding Kansas, Utah War; Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Brandy Station, Battle of Upperville, Battle of Gettysburg, Bristoe Campaign; brigade commander in the II Corps; brother of Major General Napoleon Bonaparte Buford; cousin of Confederate States Brigadier General Abraham Buford II; Fort Buford was named for him b[›][105]
Duane, James ChathamJames Chatham Duane 1848 Brigadier General; Utah War; Battle of Harpers Ferry; Chief of Engineers (1886–1888); grandson of Continental Congressional Delegate James Duane b[›][106]
Baird, AbsalomAbsalom Baird 1849 Major General; attended Washington & Jefferson College before graduating from West Point; earned fame for actions at the Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Jonesborough; received the Medal of Honor in 1896 for his actions at Jonesborough; later received the French Légion d'honneur b[›][81][107]
Parke, JohnJohn Parke 1849 Major General; Battle of Fort Macon, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Vicksburg Campaign, Overland Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, Battle of Globe Tavern, Battle of Peebles' Farm, Battle of Boydton Plank Road, Battle of Fort Stedman, Third Battle of Petersburg; division commander in the IX Corps; commander of the IX Corps and XXII Corps; commander of the Army of the Potomac; Superintendent of the United States Military Academy b[›][108]
Saxton, RufusRufus Saxton 1849 Brigadier General; Battle of Harpers Ferry; recipient of the Medal of Honor b[›][109]
Carr, Eugene AsaEugene Asa Carr 1850 Major General; Indian Wars, Bleeding Kansas, Utah War; Battle of Wilson's Creek, Battle of Pea Ridge, Battle of Port Gibson, Battle of Champion's Hill, Camden Expedition, Battle of Fort Blakely; division commander in the Army of the Southwest; division commander in the XIII Corps and VII Corps; recipient of the Medal of Honor b[›][110]
Slemmer, Adam J.Adam J. Slemmer 1850 Brigadier General; Seminole Wars; incapacitated by wounds at Battle of Stones River b[›][111]
Warren, Gouverneur K.Gouverneur K. Warren 1850 Major General; commended at the battle of Little Round Top, Chief of Engineers of the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War; participated in topographical and railroad explorations of the Mississippi River and trans-Mississippi West b[›][112]
Gillem, Alvan CullemAlvan Cullem Gillem 1851 Major General; Second Seminole War, Modoc War; Battle of Mill Springs b[›][113]
Tompkins, Charles HenryCharles Henry Tompkins 1851 ex Dropped out of the Academy after two years for unspecified reasons; Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for twice charging through the enemy's lines on July 1, 1861 near Fairfax, Virginia, making him the first Union officer of the Civil War to receive the Medal of Honor b[›][103][114]
Crook, GeorgeGeorge Crook 1852 Major General; Indian Wars; Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chickamauga, Battle of Cloyd's Mountain, Battle of Opequon, Battle of Fisher's Hill, Battle of Cedar Creek, Appomattox Campaign; brigade commander in the Kanawha Division; division commander in the Army of the Cumberland; commander of the VIII Corps; Fort Crook was named for him; the General Crook House is named for him; Crook, Colorado is named for him; Crook County, Wyoming and Crook County, Oregon are named for him b[›][115]
Kautz, AugustAugust Kautz 1852 Major General; Mexican–American War, Rogue River War, Puget Sound War; Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Fort Sanders; division commander in the XXV Corps b[›][116]
McCook, Alexander McDowellAlexander McDowell McCook 1852 Major General; Indian Wars; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, Battle of Perryville, Battle of Stones River, Battle of Chickamauga, Battle of Fort Stevens; division commander in the Army of the Ohio; commander of the I Corps and XX Corps; commander of Fort Leavenworth and the United States Army Command and General Staff College; brother of Brigadier General Robert Latimer McCook, Brigadier General Daniel McCook, Jr., and Major General and Dakota Territory Governor Edwin Stanton McCook; McCook Field was named for him and his family who were known as the "Fighting McCooks" b[›][117]
Slocum, Henry WarnerHenry Warner Slocum 1852 Major General; Seminole Wars; First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Franklin-Nashville Campaign, Sherman's March to the Sea, Battle of Averasborough, Battle of Bentonville; brigade commander in the I Corps; division commander in the VI Corps; commander of the XII Corps and XX Corps; U.S. Representative from New York; Fort Slocum was named for him; the steamship PS General Slocum was named for him b[›][118]
Stanley, David S.David S. Stanley 1852 Major General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions organizing a counterattack at the Second Battle of Franklin, commander of the IV Corps b[›][103][119]
McPherson, James B.James B. McPherson 1853 Major General; Battle of Fort Henry, Battle of Fort Donelson, Battle of Shiloh, Siege of Vicksburg, Battle of Marietta, killed during the Battle of Atlanta; commander of the XVII Corps; Fort McPherson was named for him; the Fort McPherson National Cemetery is named for him b[›][120]
Schofield, JohnJohn Schofield 1853 Lieutenant General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions leading an attack at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, Atlanta Campaign, Battle of Franklin, Battle of Nashville, Battle of Wyse Fork; commander of the Army of the Frontier, division commander in the XIV Corps; United States Secretary of War (1868–1869); Superintendent of the Academy (1876–1881); Commanding General of the United States Army (1888–1895); Military Governor of Virginia b[›][121]
Sheridan, PhilipPhilip Sheridan 1853 General; Chattanooga Campaign, Overland Campaign, Valley Campaigns of 1864, used scorched earth tactics in the Shenandoah Valley and forced Lee's surrender in the Appomattox Campaign; American Indian Wars b[›][122]
Sill, Joshua W.Joshua W. Sill 1853 Major General; killed at the Battle of Stones River; brigade commander in the Army of the Ohio and Army of the Cumberland; Fort Sill is named for him b[›]
Smith, William SooyWilliam Sooy Smith 1853 Brigadier General; colonel, 13th Ohio Infantry; promoted BG 15 April 1862 for services at the Battle of Shiloh; Battle of Perryville, Vicksburg Campaign, Battle of Okolona; brigade and division commander in the Army of the Ohio; cavalry division commander in the Army of the Tennessee; chief of cavalry, Department of Tennessee and Military Division of Mississippi; resigned 15 July 1864 citing health reasons b[›][123]
Terrill, William R.William R. Terrill 1853 Brigadier General; Bleeding Kansas; Battle of Shiloh, killed at the Battle of Perryville; brigade commander in the Army of the Ohio b[›][124]
Bliss, ZenasZenas Bliss 1854 Major General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Fredericksburg; formed the first unit of Seminole-Negro Indian Scouts b[›][81][125]
Howard, Oliver O.Oliver O. Howard 1854 Major General; Indian Wars; First Battle of Bull Run, recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions leading an attack at the Battle of Seven Pines despite wound which resulted in the loss of his right arm, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Chattanooga Campaign, Atlanta Campaign, Sherman's March to the Sea; brigade commander in the II Corps; commander of the II Corps, IV Corps, and XI Corps; Superintendent of the United States Military Academy; founder of Howard University; led the campaign against Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce tribe b[›][126]
Ruger, Thomas H.Thomas H. Ruger 1854 Major General; Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Frankin; brigade commander in the XII Corps and XX Corps; division commander in the XII Corps; Military Governor of Georgia b[›][127]
Weed, Stephen H.Stephen H. Weed 1854 Brigadier General; Third Seminole War; Bleeding Kansas; Utah War; Battle of Antietam, killed defending Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg b[›][128]
Averell, William W.William W. Averell 1855 Major General; First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Seven Days Battles, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Kelly's Ford, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Droop Mountain, Battle of Rutherford's Farm, Battle of Cove Mountain, Battle of Fisher's Hill; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac; U.S. Consul General in British North America b[›][129]
Gregg, David McMurtrieDavid McMurtrie Gregg 1855 Major General; Seven Days Battles, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Yellow Tavern, Battle of Haw's Shop, Battle of Trevilian Station, Battle of Saint Mary's Church, Valley Campaigns of 1864, Siege of Petersburg, Second Battle of Deep Bottom, Second Battle of Ream's Station, Battle of Peebles' Farm; grandson of U.S. Senator Andrew Gregg; cousin of U.S. Representative Andrew Gregg Curtin b[›][130]
Hazen, William BabcockWilliam Babcock Hazen 1855 Major General; Indian Wars; Battle of Perryville, Battle of Stones River, Tullahoma Campaign, Battle of Chickamauga, Chattanooga Campaign, Atlanta Campaign, Sherman's March to the Sea, Carolinas Campaign, Battle of Pickett's Mill; brigade commander in the Army of the Ohio and the XIV Corps; division commander in the XV Corps; Hazen Bay in Alaska is named for him b[›][131]
Torbert, Alfred Thomas ArchimedesAlfred Thomas Archimedes Torbert 1855 Major General; wounded in the Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Tom's Brook b[›][132]
Webb, Alexander S.Alexander S. Webb 1855 Major General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Gettysburg for personal bravery and leadership repulsing Pickett's Charge; president of the City College of New York (1869–1902) b[›][103][133]
Weitzel, GodfreyGodfrey Weitzel 1855 Major General; Siege of Port Hudson, First Battle of Fort Fisher; division commander in the XIX Corps; commander of the XVIII Corps and XXV Corps b[›][134]
Bayard, George DashiellGeorge Dashiell Bayard 1856 Brigadier General; Indian Wars; Battle of Port Republic, Battle of Cedar Mountain, killed during the Battle of Fredericksburg; cavalry commander in the Army of the Potomac; Fort Bayard was named for him; the Fort Bayard Historic District in Santa Clara, New Mexico is named for him b[›][135]
Forsyth, James W.James W. Forsyth 1856 Major General; Indian Wars; Jackson's Valley Campaign, Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Chickamauga, Overland Campaign, Appomattox Campaign, Battle of Cedar Creek, Battle of Five Forks; son-in-law of U.S. Postmaster General William Dennison, Jr.; Forsyth, Montana is named for him b[›][136]
Sanders, William P.William P. Sanders 1856 Brigadier General; Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Antietam b[›][137]
Robert, Henry MartynHenry Martyn Robert 1857 Brigadier General; Pig War; Chief of Engineers (1901); author of Robert's Rules of Order b[›][138]
Strong, George CrockettGeorge Crockett Strong 1857 Major General; First Battle of Bull Run, mortally wounded during the assault on Fort Wagner b[›][139]
Arnold, AbrahamAbraham Arnold 1859 Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for leading a cavalry charge against superior forces b[›][81][140]
Merritt, WesleyWesley Merritt 1860 Brigadier General; Spanish–American War; Battle of Chancellorsville, wounded at the Battle of Brandy Station, Battle of Upperville, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Yellow Tavern, Battle of Opequon, Battle of Five Forks; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac; division commander in the Army of the Potomac; Superintendent of the United States Military Academy; Military Governor of the Philippines b[›][141]
Porter, HoraceHorace Porter 1860 Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Chickamauga; United States Ambassador to France (1897–1905) b[›][142][103]
Warner, James M.James M. Warner 1860 Brigadier General; Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of Opequon, Battle of Fisher's Hill, Battle of Cedar Creek; commander of the 11th Vermont Infantry, brigade commander in the XXII Corps and VI Corps b[›][143]
Wilson, James H.James H. Wilson 1860 Major General; Spanish–American War, Boxer Rebellion; Battle of Fort Pulaski, Battle of South Mountain, Battle of Antietam, Vicksburg Campaign, Chattanooga Campaign, Overland Campaign, Valley Campaigns of 1864, Battle of Franklin, Battle of Nashville; commander of Wilson's Raid b[›][144]
Wilson, John MoulderJohn Moulder Wilson 1860 Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Malvern Hill despite acute illness; Superintendent of the Academy (1889–1893); Chief of Engineers (1897–1901) b[›][103][145]
Ames, AdelbertAdelbert Ames 1861 Major General; Spanish–American War; Battle of Yorktown, Battle of Gaines' Mill, Battle of Malvern Hill, Maryland Campaign, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg, Bermuda Hundred Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, Second Battle of Fort Fisher; commander of the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment; brigade commander in the XI Corps; recipient of the Medal of Honor; United States Senator from Mississippi (1870–1874); Governor of Mississippi (1868–1870, 1874–1876); son-in-law of U.S. Representative and Major General Benjamin Franklin Butler; father of U.S. Representative Butler Ames b[›][146]
Babcock, Orville E.Orville E. Babcock 1861 Brigadier General; Battle of Vicksburg, Battle of Blue Springs, Battle of Campbell's Station, Knoxville Campaign, Battle of the Wilderness, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Battle of Cold Harbor b[›][147]
Barlow, John W.John W. Barlow 1861 Brigadier General; Indian Wars; Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Gettysburg, Atlanta Campaign; Chief of Engineers; Barlow Peak in Yellowstone National Park is named for him [148]
Custer, George ArmstrongGeorge Armstrong Custer 1861 Major General; Battle of Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, leader of a charge at the Battle of Gettysburg that broke the back of the Confederate resistance; Battle of the Wilderness, Siege of Petersburg; Battle of the Washita, died at Battle of the Little Bighorn b[›][149]
Hazlett, Charles E.Charles E. Hazlett 1861 (May) 1st Lieutenant, Battery D, 5th U.S. Artillery; Battery D, 4th U.S. Artillery (Antietam Campaign); killed in action at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; buried at Wooodlawn Cemetery, Zanesville, Ohio [150]
Henry, Guy VernorGuy Vernor Henry 1861 Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for actions repulsing an enemy attack at the Battle of Cold Harbor; son Major General Guy Vernor Henry Jr. is an Academy alumnus, class of 1894; Governor of Puerto Rico (1898–1899) b[›][81][151]
Kilpatrick, Hugh JudsonHugh Judson Kilpatrick 1861 Major General; the first Union officer to be wounded during the Civil War at the Battle of Big Bethel, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Aldie, Battle of Upperville, Battle of Gettysburg, Overland Campaign, wounded at the Battle of Resaca, Sherman's March to the Sea, Battle of Monroe's Crossroads; brigade commander in the Army of the Potomac; division commander of the Army of the Cumberland and the Military Division of the Mississippi; U.S. Minister to Chile b[›][152]
Upton, EmoryEmory Upton 1861 Major General; Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Spotsylvania Court House; excelled at infantry, artillery, and cavalry; influential military theorist and reformer of United States Army organization and methods b[›][153]
Mackenzie, Ranald S.Ranald S. Mackenzie 1862 Major General; Indian Wars; wounded at the Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Antietam, wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, Overland Campaign, Siege of Petersburg, Battle of Fort Stevens, wounded at the Battle of Opequon, wounded at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Battle of Five Forks, Battle of Appomattox Court House, Valley Campaigns of 1864; brigade commander in the VI Corps and the Army of the James; nephew of U.S. Senator John Slidell and Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry b[›][154]
Gillespie, Jr., George LewisGeorge Lewis Gillespie, Jr. 1862 Brigadier General; recipient of the Medal of Honor for carrying dispatches under withering fire at the Battle of Cold Harbor; Chief of Engineers (1901–1904) b[›][81][145]
Man with gray beard and facing left in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons
Joseph Horace Eaton (1835)
Man standing with gray beard and facing left in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons
George Meade (1835)
Man with light beard and facing left in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons
William Tecumseh Sherman (1840)
Man with light beard sitting down in suit with vest and bow tie
Ulysses S. Grant (1843)
Man with goatee in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons
Winfield Scott Hancock (1844)
Man with moustache in uniform with two vertical columns of buttons with left hand on hip and right hand tucked inside uniform
George McClellan (1846)
Man with dark dual-pointed moustache sitting down facing left with hands crossed in uniform with two columns of buttons
George Crook (1852)
Man with moustache and large sideburns facing right in a dress uniform with awards
John Schofield (1853)
Man with moustache sitting down with arm on table in uniform with two columns of buttons
Philip Sheridan (1853)
Man with beard looking right in military dress uniform with several medals
Oliver Howard (1854)
Man sitting with beard looking right in military uniform
Alexander Webb (1855)
Man with moustache sitting in chair facing left wearing suit
Adelbert Ames (1861)
Man with broad hat, scarf, and large gloves in uniform with two columns of buttons
George Armstrong Custer (1861)

References[edit]

General

^ a: Special Collections: Biographical Register of the Officers and Graduates of the U. S. Military Academy. West Point, NY: United States Military Academy Library. 1950. 
^ b: "Civil War Generals from West Point". University of Tennessee – Knoxville. 2003. Retrieved 2009-06-28. 

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