List of University of California, Berkeley alumni

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This page lists notable alumni and students of the University of California, Berkeley. Alumni who also served as faculty are listed in bold font, with degree and year.

Notable faculty members are in the article List of UC Berkeley faculty.


Nobel laureates[edit]

Alumni of the University of California, Berkeley
Steve Wozniak, BS 1986, co-founder of Apple Computer
Gordon Moore, BS 1950, co-founder of semiconductor company Intel
Carol Greider, PhD 1987, Nobel laureate (2009, Physiology or Medicine)
Hamilton O. Smith, BA 1952, Nobel laureate (1978, Physiology or Medicine)
Robert Laughlin, BA 1972, Nobel laureate (1998, Physics)
Thomas Schelling, BA 1944, Nobel laureate (2005, Economics)
Andrew Fire, BA 1978, Nobel laureate (2006, Physiology or Medicine)
Thomas J. Sargent, BA 1964, Nobel laureate (2011, Economics)
David J. Wineland, BA 1965, Nobel laureate (2012, Physics)
Barry Barish, BS 1957, PhD 1962, Nobel laureate (2017, Physics)
Dana Scott, BS 1954, Turing Award laureate (1976)
1983 Turing Award laureate Ken Thompson (left), BS 1965, MS 1966, with fellow laureate and colleague Dennis Ritchie (right); together, they created Unix
The computer mouse was invented by 1997 Turing Award laureate Doug Engelbart, B. Eng. 1952, Ph.D. 1955
Barbara Liskov, BA Math 1961, Turing Award laureate (2008)
Charles P. Thacker, BA Physics 1967, Turing Award laureate (2009)
Leonard Adleman, BA Math 1969, PhD EECS 1976, Turing Award laureate (2002)
Jay Miner, BS 1959, "father of the Amiga" computer
Academy Award-winning actor Gregory Peck, BA 1942
Emmy- and Golden Globe Award- award-winning actress Kathy Baker, BA 1977
Academy Award-winning documentary director Freida Lee Mock, BA 1961
Will Vinton, B.A. 1970, Academy Award and Emmy Award winning pioneer of Claymation
Scott Adams, MBA 1986, creator of the comic strip Dilbert
Natalie Coughlin, BA 2005, Olympic gold medalist; first American female athlete in modern Olympic history to win six medals in one Olympics[1]
Jonny Moseley, BA 2007, Olympic gold medalist
Alex Morgan, BA 2010, Olympic gold medalist
Tom Anderson, BA 1998, Co-founder and president of MySpace
Astronaut James van Hoften, BS 1966
Astronaut F. Drew Gaffney, BA 1968
Astronaut Margaret Rhea Seddon, BS 1970
Astronaut Leroy Chiao, BS 1983, "first Asian-American and ethnic Chinese to perform a spacewalk"[2]
Astronaut Rex Walheim, BS 1984, member of the "Final Four"[3][4] astronauts who flew on the very last Space Shuttle flight of STS-135
Space tourist and Microsoft billionaire Charles Simonyi, BS 1972
Roxann Dawson, BA 1980, actress (B'Elanna Torres on the television series Star Trek: Voyager), director, author, and playwright
Chris Pine, BA 2002, actor (Captain James T. Kirk in the 2009 Academy Award-winning[5] film Star Trek)
John Cho, BA 1996, actor (portrayed Hikaru Sulu in the 2009 Academy Award-winning[5] film Star Trek and portrayed Harold Lee in the Harold & Kumar film series)
Captain Glen Edwards, BS 1941, namesake of Edwards Air Force Base (where the space shuttle has landed 53 times[6])
Lillian Moller Gilbreth, BA 1900, MA 1902, industrial/organizational psychologist and subject of the book (and film) Cheaper by the Dozen
Alice Waters, BA 1967, celebrity chef, founder of restaurant Chez Panisse, originator of California cuisine; 2015 National Humanities Medal recipient
GTK was created by Peter Mattis, BS 1997
Mark Anchor Albert, BA 1984, lawyer, philanthropist, founder of the Queen of Angels Foundation

See also: List of Nobel laureates associated with UC Berkeley

Name Degree(s) Prize Year Prize Field Reason (Prize Citation) Additional Notability
Frances H. Arnold PhD 1985 [8] 2018 Chemistry "for the directed evolution of enzymes" [9] 2011 National Medal of Technology "for pioneering research on biofuels and chemicals that could lead to the replacement of pollution-generating materials"[10]; Dick and Barbara Dickinson Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Biochemistry at Caltech [11]


Barry Barish B.S. 1957, Ph.D. 1962 [12] 2017 Physics "for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves". [13]
Thomas Cech Ph.D. 1975 1989 Chemistry "for the discovery of catalytic properties of RNA"[14]
Steven Chu Ph.D. 1976 1997 Physics "for the development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light"[15] Secretary of Energy in the Obama administration
Robert Curl Ph.D. 1957 1996 Chemistry "for the discovery of fullerenes"[16]
Joseph Erlanger B.S. 1895 1944 Medicine "for discoveries relating to the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibres"[17]
Andrew Fire B.A. 1978 2006 Medicine [18] "for the discovery of RNA interferencegene silencing by double–stranded RNA"[19]
William F. Giauque B.S. 1920, Ph.D. 1922 1949 Chemistry "for his contributions in the field of chemical thermodynamics, particularly concerning the behaviour of substances at extremely low temperatures"[20]
Carol W. Greider Ph.D. 1987 2009 Medicine "for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase"[21] Daniel Nathans Professor and the Director of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University
David Gross Ph.D. 1966 2004 Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction"[22]
Alan Heeger Ph.D. 1961 2000 Chemistry "for the discovery and development of conductive polymers" [23]
Daniel Kahneman Ph.D. 1961 2002 Economics "for having integrated insights from psychological research into economic science, especially concerning human judgment and decision–making under uncertainty"[24]
Lawrence Klein B.A. 1942 1980 Economics "for the creation of econometric models and the application to the analysis of economic fluctuations and economic policies"[25]
Willis Lamb B.S. 1934, Ph.D. 1938 1955 Physics "for his discoveries concerning the fine structure of the hydrogen spectrum"[26]
Robert Laughlin B.A. 1972 1998 Physics "for the discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations"[27]
Yuan T. Lee Ph.D. 1962 1986 Chemistry "for contributions concerning the dynamics of chemical elementary processes"[28] Professor of Chemistry; Principal Investigator, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory;
Willard Libby B.S. 1931, Ph.D. 1933 1960 Chemistry "for his method to use carbon–14 for age determination in archaeology, geology, geophysics, and other branches of science" [29] Professor of Chemistry
John C. Mather Ph.D. 1974 2006 Physics "for the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation"[30]
Mario Molina Ph.D. 1972 1995 Chemistry "for work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone"[31]
Kary Mullis Ph.D. 1973 1993 Chemistry "for his invention of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method"[32]
Douglass North B.A. 1942, Ph.D. 1952 1993 Economics "for having renewed research in economic history by applying economic theory and quantitative methods in order to explain economic and institutional change"[33]
Saul Perlmutter Ph.D. 1986 2011 Physics "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae" [34] Professor of Physics at UC Berkeley; co–discoverer of Dark Energy as head of the Supernova Cosmology Project;
Thomas J. Sargent B.A. 1964[35] 2011 Economics " for empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy"[36] William R. Berkley Professor of Economics and Business at New York University,[37]
Thomas Schelling B.A. 1944 2005 Economics "for having enhanced our understanding of conflict and cooperation through game–theory analysis"[38]
Glenn T. Seaborg Ph.D. 1937 1951 Chemistry "for discoveries in the chemistry of the transuranium elements"[39] University Professor of Chemistry; Associate Director, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Chancellor, Berkeley campus (1958–1961)
Hamilton O. Smith B.A. 1952 1978 Medicine "for the discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to problems of molecular genetics"[40]
Otto Stern L.L.D 1930 1943 Physics "for his contribution to the development of the molecular ray method and his discovery of the magnetic moment of the proton"[41]
Henry Taube Ph.D. 1940 1983 Chemistry "for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes"[42]
Harold Urey Ph.D. 1923 1934 Chemistry "for his discovery of heavy hydrogen"[43]
Selman Waksman Ph.D. 1918 1952 Medicine "for his discovery of streptomycin, the first antibiotic effective against tuberculosis"[44]
David J. Wineland BA Physics 1965[45] 2012 Physics "for ground–breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems"[46]

Turing Award laureates[edit]

The Turing Award is considered to be the "Nobel Prize" of computer science.

Name Degree(s) Prize Year Reason (Prize Citation) Additional Notability
Leonard Adleman B.A. 1968, Ph.D. 1976,[47] 2002 for the "ingenious contribution for making public–key cryptography useful in practice." co-author of the RSA encryption algorithm for computer security
Douglas C. Engelbart B.Eng. 1952[48], Ph.D. 1955 1997 "for an inspiring vision of the future of interactive computing and the invention of key technologies to help realize this vision." Inventor of the computer mouse, recipient of the National Medal of Technology in 2000, pioneer in hypertext and networked computers
Shafi Goldwasser M.S. 1981, Ph.D. 1983 2012 "for transformative work that laid the complexity–theoretic foundations for the science of cryptography and in the process pioneered new methods for efficient verification of mathematical proofs in complexity theory"[49] professor of computer science and the mathematical sciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science;[50], recipient of two Gödel Prizes (1993, "for the development of interactive proof systems" and 2001 "for the PCP theorem and its applications to hardness of approximation") RSA Professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, [50]
Jim Gray B.S. 1966, Ph.D. 1969 2001[51] "for seminal contributions to database and transaction processing research and technical leadership in system implementation."
Butler Lampson Ph.D. 1967 1992[52] "for contributions to the development of distributed, personal computing environments and the technology for their implementation: workstations, networks, operating systems, programming systems, displays, security and document publishing." founding member of Xerox PARC, major contributor to the development of the personal computer
Barbara Liskov B.A. 1961 2008 [53][54] "for contributions to practical and theoretical foundations of programming language and system design, especially related to data abstraction, fault tolerance, and distributed computing." first woman in the United States to earn a Ph.D. in Computer Science (in 1968 at Stanford), creator of CLU, professor at MIT
Silvio Micali Ph.D. 1982 2012 "for transformative work that laid the complexity–theoretic foundations for the science of cryptography and in the process pioneered new methods for efficient verification of mathematical proofs in complexity theory";[49] recipient of the Gödel Prize in 1993 "for the development of interactive proof systems" Ford Professor of Engineering at MIT[50]
Dana Scott B.S. 1954 1976 for "the joint paper (with Rabin) "Finite Automata and Their Decision Problem", which introduced the idea of nondeterministic machines, which has proved to be an enormously valuable concept. Their (Scott & Rabin) classic paper has been a continuous source of inspiration for subsequent work in this field" former Associate Professor of Math at UC Berkeley, professor emeritus at Carnegie Mellon University
Charles P. Thacker B.A. 1967[55] 2009[56] "for the pioneering design and realization of the first modern personal computer—the Alto at Xerox PARC—and seminal inventions and contributions to local area networks (including the Ethernet), multiprocessor workstations, snooping cache coherence protocols, and tablet personal computers."[57] Microsoft Technical Fellow, chief designer of the Alto computer at Xerox PARC, co–inventor of Ethernet, recipient of the IEEE John von Neumann Medal in 2007, recipient of the Draper Prize in 2004;
Ken Thompson B.S. 1965, M.S. 1966 1983 for the "development of generic operating systems theory and specifically for the implementation of the UNIX operating system." Co–creator of the Unix operating system
Niklaus Wirth Ph.D. 1967 1984 "for developing a sequence of innovative computer languages, EULER, ALGOL–W, MODULA and Pascal." creator of the Pascal programming language,

Academy Award[edit]

Recipients[edit]

Name Degree(s) Notability
Mark Berger B.A. 1964 Recipient of four Academy Awards for sound mixing; Adjunct professor at UC Berkeley[58]
Paul E. Debevec Ph.D. 1996 Associate Director of Graphics Research at the University of Southern California's Institute for Creative Technologies, recipient of a Scientific and Technical Academy Award in 2010[59] for work used on the James Cameron film Avatar, the Sam Raimi film Spider–Man 2, and the Peter Jackson film King Kong.
Tony DeRose Ph.D. 1985 Senior Scientist and leader of the Research Group at Pixar Animation Studios, recipient of a Scientific and Technical Academy Award in 2006 for work on surface representations[60]
Charles H. Ferguson B.A. 1978 Recipient of an Academy Award for Best Documentary for Inside Job (2010),[61] Academy Award nomination[62] for the documentary film No End in Sight (2007),[63] former fellow at the Brookings Institution, lifelong member of the Council on Foreign Relations, co–founder of Vermeer Technologies Incorporated (acquired by Microsoft for $133 million[64]), founder and president of Representational Pictures
Edith Head B.A. 1918 costume designer, recipient of eight Academy Awards[65] and nominated for 34 Academy Awards[65]
Chris Innis B.A. [66] Recipient of the Academy Award for Best Film Editing (for The Hurt Locker (2010))[67]
Joe Letteri B.A. 1981 [68] Recipient of four Academy Awards for Best Visual Special Effects in films directed by James Cameron (Avatar) and Peter Jackson (King Kong, The Two Towers and The Return of the King).[69]
Freida Lee Mock B.A. 1961 Documentary filmmaker, recipient of the Academy Award for Best Documentary in 1995 (for Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision)
Megan Mylan M.J. 1997, M.A. 1997 Recipient of an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short for Smile Pinki (2009)[70]
Gregory Peck B.A. 1942 [71] Actor, recipient of the Academy Award for Best Actor for portrayal of Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), nominated for the Oscar four other times; served as president of the Screen Actors Guild
Walter Plunkett B.A. 1923 Costume designer, recipient of the Academy Award for Best Costume Design for the 1951 film An American in Paris starring Gene Kelly
Loren L. Ryder B.A. 1924[72] audio sound engineer, recipient of six Academy Awards,[73] nominated for another twelve more Academy Awards[72]
Will Vinton B.A. 1970[74] pioneer of Claymation® (clay animation),[75] co–recipient of the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 1974 (Closed Mondays),[75] namesake and founder of Will Vinton Studios (known for The California Raisins and the Domino's Pizza Noid), recipient of two Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Animation programs (A Claymation Christmas Celebration and A Claymation Easter )
Petro Vlahos B.S. 1941[76] Pioneer[76][77] in traveling matte (blue–screen and green–screen) visual effects technology (used in films such as Ben–Hur, Mary Poppins, and the first Star Wars trilogy[77]), recipient of five special Academy Awards[78] and an Emmy Award[76]
Michael Wilson B.A. 1936[79] screenwriter, recipient of two Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay ( for the 1951 film A Place in the Sun[80] and the 1957 film The Bridge on the River Kwai[81]); nominated for the Academy Award for three other films (for the 1953 film 5 Fingers,[82] the 1956 Academy Award nominated film Friendly Persuasion,[83] and the Academy Award winning 1962 Best Picture film Lawrence of Arabia[84][85]); also co–screenwriter for the 1968 Academy Award winning film Planet of the Apes [86][87][88]

Nominees[edit]

Name Degree(s) Notability
Jon H. Else B.A. 1968 Prix Italia recipient (The Day After Trinity), recipient of four Emmy Awards,[89] nominated twice for the Academy Award (for the documentaries The Day After Trinity and Arthur and Lillie), cinematographer on the Academy Award–winning Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids?, 1999 winner of the Sundance Film Festival Filmmaker's Trophy, MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow, professor of journalism at UC Berkeley
Dan Krauss M.A. Journalism 2004 nominated twice for Best Documentary Short Subject (for The Death of Kevin Carter: Casualty of the Bang Bang Club and Extremis ) [90]
Melissa Mathison B.A. screenwriter, nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the Steven Spielberg film E.T. the Extra–Terrestrial; known also for the Francis Ford Coppola film The Black Stallion and the Martin Scorsese film Kundun[91]
Daphne Matziaraki M.A. Journalism 2016 nominated for Best Documentary Short Subject (4.1 Miles) [90]
David Peoples BA English[92] screenwriter (the Ridley Scott film Blade Runner and the Terry Gilliam film 12 Monkeys), nominated for the Academy Award for Best Screenplay for the Clint Eastwood film Unforgiven (which did win the Academy Award for Best Picture); collaborator with Jon Else (BA 1968) on the Academy Award winning documentary Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids? and the Academy Award nominated documentary The Day After Trinity[93]
James Schamus BA, MA, PhD[94] screenwriter, nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and Academy Award for Best Original Song for the Ang Lee movie Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; producer; co–founder and inaugural CEO of movie studio Focus Features[95]

Pulitzer Prize[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year Award Category Additional Notability
Alexandra Berzon M.A. 2006 2009[96] Public Service
Kathleen Lund Coates MA 1978 2018 [97] Breaking News
Robert Digitale MA 1979 2018[97] Breaking News
Rube Goldberg B.S. 1904 1948[98] Editorial Cartooning Cartoonist; namesake of "Rube Goldberg device"
Angel Gonzalez M.A. Journalism 2003 2015[99] Breaking News
Marguerite Higgins B.A. 1941 1951 International Reporting journalist; honored on a commemorative postal stamp issued by the United States Post Office[100]


Julie Johnson MA 2009 2018[97] Breaking News
Soumya Karlamangla B.A. 2013 2016 [101] Breaking News
Leon Litwack B.A.[102] 1951, PhD 1958 1980[103] History (for his book Been In the Storm So Long: The Aftermath of Slavery) professor emeritus of history at UC Berkeley,[104]
T. Christian Miller B.A. 1992 2016[105][101] Explanatory Reporting lecturer at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism
Sonia Nazario M.A. 1988 2003 [106][107] Feature Writing journalist at the Los Angeles Times
Viet Thanh Nguyen B.A. 1992, PhD 1997 2016 [108] Fiction for his novel The Sympathizer Novelist
Diane Peterson MA 1982 2018[97] Breaking News
Matt Richtel B.A. 1989 2010 [109] National Reporting co–author of the comic strip Rudy Park under the pen name of "Theron Heir"[110]
Jim Simon M.A. Journalism 1984 2015 [99] Breaking News
Alexa Vaughn M.A. Journalism 2011 2015 [99] Breaking News
Robert Penn Warren M.A. 1927 1946 Fiction for All the King's Men All the King's Men (1946) was later made into a movie of the same name which won three Academy Awards [111]
1953 Poetry
1979 Poetry


Brett Wilkison MA 2008 2018 [97] Breaking News
Greg Winter M.A. Journalism 2000 2015 [99] International Reporting

Emmy Award[edit]

Name Degree(s) Notability
Kathy Baker B.A. 1977 three–time recipient of the Emmy Award, actress (Picket Fences [TV series, 1992–1996)]; The Right Stuff [1983], Edward Scissorhands [1990], The Cider House Rules [1999], Cold Mountain [2003])
Christine Chen BA 1990 journalist, former news Anchor for KSTW and KCPQ–TV (both in Seattle, Washington), recipient of two Emmy Awards (1996 and 2002[112]); principal of marketing communications consulting company Chen Communications
Carrie Ching M.A. 2005 journalist; recipient of an Emmy Award for New Approaches to News & Documentary[113]
Liz Claman B.A. 1985 journalist, current Fox Business anchor (Countdown to the Closing Bell), former CNBC Morning Call co–anchor,[114] recipient of two Emmy Awards for broadcast production and journalism[115]
Diane Dwyer BS Finance 1987 journalist, member of the faculty at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business, recipient of two Emmy Awards in broadcast journalism [116]
Jon H. Else B.A. 1968 Prix Italia recipient (The Day After Trinity), recipient of four Emmy Awards,[89] nominated twice for the Academy Award, 1999 winner of the Sundance Film Festival Filmmaker's Trophy, MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow, cinematographer on the Academy Award–winning Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids?, professor of journalism at UC Berkeley
Jonathan Jones MA 2005 2015 Emmy Award in Outstanding Long Form Investigative Journalism, 2015 Emmy Award in Outstanding Research[117]
Elisabeth Leamy BA Consumer Correspondent for ABC's Good Morning America, recipient of 13 Emmy Awards in broadcast journalism[118]
Ken Milnes B.S. EECS 1977 Senior Vice–President of television technology company Sportvision, recipient of four Emmy Awards in broadcasting technology[119]
Linda Schacht B.A. 1966, M.A. 1981 journalist, recipient of two Emmy Awards for broadcast journalism;[120][121] lecturer at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism
Margret Schmidt BS EECS 1992 Vice President of Design & Engineering and Chief Design Officer at NASDAQ–listed digital video recorder company TiVO; recipient of the 2006 Emmy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Interactive Television;[122][123] Industry Faculty lecturer at UC Berkeley [124]
Andrew Schneider B.A. 1973 screenwriter and executive producer, recipient of two Emmy Awards (for Northern Exposure and The Sopranos) [125]
Leroy Sievers B.A.[126] news journalist, executive producer of news program Nightline, recipient of 12 national news Emmy Awards, two Peabody Awards, and two Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Awards[126][127]
Bret Sigler MA 2003 recipient of the Emmy Award for Outstanding News Editing in 2015 [117]
Jason Spingarn–Koff MA 2001– recipient of the Emmy Award in Arts, Lifestyle, and Culture in 2015[117]
Lisa Stark B.A. 1978 ABC News correspondent, recipient of two Emmy Awards[128] for broadcast journalism, recipient of the Peabody Award[128] and an Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award[128]
Kristen Sze B.A. journalist, TV news anchor for KGO–TV (in the San Francisco Bay area), former New York correspondent for Extra, recipient of two Emmy Awards for broadcast journalism[129]
Jon F. Vein BS in Material Sciences and EECS [130] Chief Operating Officer of Film Roman; producer; 2001 Emmy Award for Outstanding Animation for The Simpsons;[131] co–founder and CEO of MarketShare (acquired for $450 million by Neustar[132])
Will Vinton B.A. Architecture 1970[74] pioneer of Claymation® (clay animation),[75] co–recipient of the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film in 1974 (Closed Mondays),[75] namesake and founder of Will Vinton Studios (known for The California Raisins and the Domino's Pizza Noid), recipient of two Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Animation programs (A Claymation Christmas Celebration and A Claymation Easter ) (also listed in Academy Awards section)
Petro Vlahos BS Eng 1941[76] pioneer[76][77] in traveling matte (blue–screen and green–screen) visual effects technology (used in films such as Ben–Hur, Mary Poppins, and the first Star Wars trilogy[77]), recipient of five special Academy Awards[78] and an Emmy Award[76] (also listed in Academy Awards section)

Fields Medal[edit]

Name Degree(s) Fields Medal Award Year Additional Notability
Michael Freedman (briefly attended as an undergraduate)[133] 1986 math lecturer at UC Berkeley (1973-1975) [134]
William Thurston Ph.D. 1972 [135] 1982
Shing–Tung Yau (Chinese: 丘成桐) Ph.D. 1971 [136] 1982 National Medal of Science in 1997

Wolf Prize[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year Award Field Wolf Prize Citation Additional Notability
Paul Alivisatos Ph.D. 1986 2012 [137] Chemistry for the development of "the colloidal inorganic nanocrystal as a building block of nanoscience making fundamental contributions to controlling the synthesis of these particles, to measuring and understanding their physical properties, and to utilizing their unique properties for applications ranging from light generation and harvesting to biological imaging."[138]
Henry Eyring Ph.D. 1927 1980 Chemistry "for his development of absolute rate theory and its imaginative applications to chemical and physical processes."[139]
George Feher B.S. 1950, M.S. 1951, Ph.D. 1954[140] 2006/2007[141] Chemistry "for the ingenious structural discoveries of the ribosomal machinery of peptide–bond formation and the light–driven primary processes in photosynthesis"[142] inventor[143] of electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR); professor at the University of California, San Diego;
Herbert S. Gutowsky M.S. 1946[144] 1983/1984 Chemistry "for his pioneering work in the development and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in chemistry''[145]
Bertrand Halperin Ph.D. 1965[146] 2002/2003 Physics "for key insights into the broad range of condensed matter physics... on two– dimensional melting, disordered systems and strongly interacting electrons."[147] Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at Harvard University;
John F. Hartwig PhD 1990 2019 [148] Chemistry "for the development of efficient transition-metal catalysts that have revolutionized drug manufacturing, leading to breakthroughs in molecule and synthetics design"[149] Henry Rapoport Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley (2011-present)[148]
Elizabeth Neufeld PhD 1956 1988 Medicine "for the biochemical elucidation of lysosomal storage diseases and the resulting contributions to biology, pathology, prenatal diagnosis, and therapeutics."[150]
George Pimentel Ph.D. 1949[151] 1982 Chemistry for the "development of matrix isolation spectroscopy and for the discovery of photodissociation lasers and chemical lasers."[142] professor at UC Berkeley (1949–1989); inventor of the chemical laser;
Gary Ruvkun B.A. Biophysics 1973[152] 2014 Medicine "for the discovery of the micro–RNA molecules that play a key role in controlling gene expression in natural processes and disease development."[153][154]
Gabor A. Somorjai Ph.D. 1960[155][156] 1998 Chemistry for "outstanding contributions to the field of the surface science in general, and for their elucidation of fundamental mechanisms of heterogeneous catalytic reactions at single crystal surfaces in particular. ";[157] professor of chemistry at University of California, Berkeley (1964–present);


Chien-Shiung Wu Ph.D. 1940[158] 1978 Physics "for her explorations of the weak interaction, helping establish the precise form and the non–conservation of parity for this natural force ";[147] first female president of the American Physical Society[158] professor of physics at Columbia University (1940–1980)
Shing-Tung Yau Ph.D. 1971[159][160] 2010 Mathematics "for his work in geometric analysis that has had a profound and dramatic impact on many areas of geometry and physics"[161](also listed in Fields Medal) professor of mathematics at Harvard University; Fields Medal laureate; recipient of the Wolf Prize (Mathematics, 2010)
David Zilberman PhD 1979 2019 [162] Agriculture "for developing economic models that address fundamental issues in agriculture, economics and policymaking" [149] Professor (holder of the Robinson Chair) in the Agricultural and Resource Economics Department at UC Berkeley (1979-present)[163]



National Humanities Medal[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year National Humanities Medal Citation Additional Notability
Stephen Balch MA 1967, PhD 1972 2007 "for leadership and advocacy upholding the noblest traditions in higher education"[164] founder of the National Association of Scholars, founder of the American Academy for Liberal Education, founding member and trustee of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, founder of the Study of Western Civilization
Joan Didion BA 1956 2013[165] "her mastery of style in writing. Exploring the culture around us and exposing the depths of sorrow, Ms. Didion has produced works of startling honesty and fierce intellect, rendered personal stories universal, and illuminated the seemingly peripheral details that are central to our lives"[166] writer, author of Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968), The White Album (1979), and The Year of Magical Thinking (2005);
Maxine Hong Kingston B.A. 1962 1997[167] "her contributions as a writer. Her novels and non–fiction have examined how the past influences our present, and her voice has strengthened our understanding of Asian American identity, helping shape our national conversation about culture, gender, and race. ";[168] author; Senior Lecturer at UC Berkeley; recipient of the National Medal of Arts in 2013[169]
Ramón Eduardo Ruiz PhD 1954 1998 [170][171] Professor of History (specializing in Mexico and Latin America) at the University of California, San Diego
Henry Snyder BA, MA, PhD 2007 "for visionary leadership in bridging the worlds of scholarship and technology";[172][173] Professor Emeritus of History (specializing in Britain) at the University of California, Riverside; 2009 Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire medal (bestowed by Queen Elizabeth II) [174]
Kevin Starr M.L.S. 1974 2006 [175][176] Professor of Urban and Regional Planning and Professor of History (specializing in California) at the University of Southern California
Alice Waters B.A. 1967 2015[177][178] for "celebrating the bond between the ethical and the edible. As a chef, author, and advocate, Ms. Waters champions a holistic approach to eating and health and celebrates integrating gardening, cooking, and education, sparking inspiration in a new generation.";[179] celebrity chef, founder of restaurant Chez Panisse, originator of California cuisine; member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; recipient of five James Beard Foundation Awards (1984 Who's Who of Food & Beverage, 1997 Fruits & Vegetables, 1992 Outstanding Chef, 1992 Outstanding Restaurant, 1997 Humanitarian of the Year, 2004 Lifetime Achievement)[180]

National Medal of Science[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year National Medal of Science Citation Additional Notability


Philip Abelson PhD 1939 1987 "for his path–breaking contributions in radiochemistry, physics, geophysics, biophysics, and biochemistry and for his vigorous and penetrating counsel on national matters involving science and technology."[181] physicist and science writer; co–discoverer of neptunium
Berni Alder BS 1947, MS 1948 2009 [182] "for establishing powerful computer methods useful for molecular dynamics simulations, conceiving and executing experimental shock–wave simulations to obtain properties of fluids and solids at very high pressures, and developing Monte Carlo methods for calculating the properties of matter from first principles, all of which contributed to major achievements in the science of condensed matter."[183]
Daniel I. Arnon BS 1932, PhD 1936[184] 1973 [185] "for fundamental research into the mechanism of green plant utilization of light to produce chemical energy and oxygen and for contributions to our understanding of plant nutrition"[186] professor of cell physiology at UC Berkeley specializing in photosynthesis


Paul Alivisatos PhD 1986 2014 "for his foundational contributions to the field of nanoscience; for the development of nanocrystals as a building block of nanotechnologies; and for his leadership in the nanoscience community.""[187] also listed in §Wolf Prize
John N. Bahcall B.S. 1956 1998 [188] "for his fundamental contributions to areas of modern astrophysics ranging from solar neutrino physics to the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy to cosmology, and for his leadership of the astronomical community, especially his tireless advocacy of the Hubble Space Telescope.",[189] astrophysicist, best known[188] for his work on the Standard Solar Model and the Hubble Space Telescope; recipient of the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal[188] in 1992, co–winner of the Fermi award in 2003
John Isaiah Brauman PhD 1963 2002 "for his seminal contributions in chemistry, giving new insight into the properties of ions and the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions, and for his landmark achievement in clarifying the key role of solvent in determining acid–base chemistry."[190]


John W. Cahn Ph.D. 1953 1998 "for his pioneering work on thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transitions and diffusion, on interfacial phenomena, and for his contributions to the understanding of periodic and quasi–periodic structures."[191] materials scientist


Thomas Cech PhD 1975 1995 "for his discoveries regarding RNA catalysis that have added new dimensions to the understanding of the role of RNA in living systems."[192] Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator (also listed in §Nobel laureates)
Brent Dalrymple PhD 1963 2003 "for his pioneering work in determining the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale; a discovery that led to the theory of plate tectonics."[193]
George Dantzig PhD 1946 [194] 1975 "for inventing linear programming and discovering methods that led to wide–scale scientific and technical applications to important problems in logistics, scheduling, and network optimization, and to the use of computers in making efficient use of the mathematical theory."[195] creator of the simplex algorithm; Professor Emeritus of Transportation Sciences and Professor of Operations Research and of Computer Science at Stanford University;
Henry Eyring Ph.D. 1927 1966 "for contributions to our understanding of the structure and properties of matter, especially for his creation of absolute rate theory, one of the sharpest tools in the study of rates of chemical reaction."[196] namesake of the Eyring equation; Professor of Chemistry (Princeton University), dean of the University of Utah graduate school and recipient of the
Herbert S. Gutowsky MS 1946[197] 1976 "in recognition of pioneering studies in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy."[198]
Daniel E. Koshland Jr. BA 1941 [199] 1990 "for profoundly influencing the understanding of how proteins function through his induced–fit model of enzyme actrion. His incisive analysis of bacterial chemotaxis has led to a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of memory and adaptation."[200] professor of biochemistry at UC Berkeley
Willis Lamb BS 1934. PhD 1938 2000 "for his towering contributions to classical and quantum theories of laser radiation and quantum optics, and to the proper interpretation of quantum mechanics."[201] also listed in §Nobel laureates
Yuan T. Lee PhD 1965 1986 "for his world leadership in the development of molecular beam techniques and their application to the study of chemical dynamics. His work has had an enormous impact on many areas of physical chemistry, especially building up a quantitative bridge between the laws of mechanics and complex macroscopic phenomena."[202] Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley; also listed in §Nobel laureates
Tung-Yen Lin M.S. 1933 1986 "for his work as an engineer, teacher and author whose scientific analyses, technological innovation, and visionary designs have spanned the gulf not only between science and art, but also between technology and society."[203] Professor of Civil Engineering, bridge builder, pioneering researcher and practitioner of prestressed concrete, designed Moscone Center
Lynn Margulis PhD 1963 1999 "for her outstanding contributions to understanding of the development, structure, and evolution of living things, for inspiring new research in the biological, climatological, geological and planetary sciences, and for her extraordinary abilities as a teacher and communicator of science to the public."[204] botanist known for endosymbiosis theory; Distinguished University Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; first wife of Carl Sagan;
Elizabeth Neufeld PhD 1956 1994 "for her contributions to the understanding of the lysosomal storage diseases, demonstrating the strong linkage between basic and applied scientific investigation."[205] researcher on the relationship of genetics to metabolic disease, professor and chair of biological chemistry at UCLA; also listed in §Wolf Prize)
Albert Overhauser BS 1948, PhD 1951 [206] 1994 "for his fundamental contributions to understanding the physics of solids, to theoretical physics, and for the impact of his technological advances."[207] professor at Purdue University (1973–2011)
George C. Pimentel Ph.D. 1949 1983 "for his varied and ingenious use of infrared spectroscopy to study chemical bonding and molecular dynamics, and for his discovery of the first chemically pumped laser, which has had strong scientific impact as well as practical applications."[208] inventor of the chemical laser; Director, Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics at UC Berkeley ; also listed in §Wolf Prize
Kenneth Pitzer PhD 1937 1974 "for his pioneering application of statistical thermodynamics and spectroscopy to our understanding of the properties of organic and inorganic materials."[209] lecturer and professor (1935–1964 and 1971–1984) and dean (1951–1960) of the College of Chemistry at UC Berkeley;[210]
Peter H. Raven BS 1957 2000 "For his contributions to the dynamics of plant systematics and evolution, the introduction of the concept of coevolution, and his major contribution to the international efforts to preserve biodiversity."[211] Director and Engelmann Professor of Botany at Missouri Botanical Garden at Washington University (St. Louis, Missouri);
Roger Revelle PhD 1936 1990 "for his pioneering work in the areas of carbon dioxide and climate modification, oceanographic exploration presaging plate tectonics, and the biological effects of radiation in the marine environment, and studies of human population growth and global food supplies."[212] researcher of global warming theory; Director Emeritus Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Policy Emeritus, Harvard University;
Frederick Rossini PhD 1928 1976 "for contributions to basic reference knowledge in chemical thermodynamics."[213] professor of chemical thermodynamics at Rice University


Glenn T. Seaborg PhD 1937 1991 "for his outstanding work as a chemist, scientist and teacher in the field of nuclear chemistry."[214] also listed in §Nobel laureates
Susan Solomon M.S. 1979, Ph.D. 1981 2000 "for key scientific insights in explaining the cause of the Antarctic Ozone hole and for advancing the understanding of the global ozone layer; for changing the direction of ozone research through her findings; and for exemplary service to worldwide public policy decisions and to the American public."[215] Senior Scientist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),


Gabor A. Somorjai Ph.D. 1960[155] 2002 "honored as the world's leading authority in the development of modern surface science, having established the molecular foundation of many surface–based technologies."[216] professor of chemistry at University of California, Berkeley (1964–present); also listed in Wolf Prize section
Earl Reece Stadtman BS 1942 [217] 1979 "for seminal contributions to understanding of the energy metabolism of anaerobic bacteria and for elucidation of major mechanisms whereby the rates of metabolic processes are finely matched to the requirements of the living cell."[218] Chief of the Laboratory of Biochemistry at the National Institutes of Health;


Peter J. Stang Ph.D. 1966 2010 "for his creative contributions to the development of organic supramolecular chemistry and for his outstanding and unique record of public service.";[219] professor of chemistry at the University of Utah
JoAnne Stubbe PhD 1971 2008[182] "for her ground–breaking experiments establishing the mechanisms of ribonucleotide reductases, polyester synthases, and natural product DNA cleavers compelling demonstrations of the power of chemical investigations to solve problems in biology."[220]
Henry Taube PhD 1940 1976 "in recognition of contributions to the understanding of reactivity and reaction mechanisms in inorganic chemistry."[221] also listed in §Nobel laureates
Harold Urey PhD 1923 1964 "for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the origin and evolution of the solar system and the origin of life on Earth and for pioneering work in the application of isotopes to the determination of the temperatures of ancient oceans."[222] physical chemist on isotopes ; also listed in §Nobel laureates
John Roy Whinnery BS EE 1937 PhD 1948 1992 "for his research contributions to microwaves, lasers, and quantum electronics; for his excellence as a teacher and author; and for his extensive services to government and professional organizations."[223] lecturer and professor(1946–2007) and dean (1959–1963) of the EECS Department at UC Berkeley[224]


Robert R. Wilson BA 1936, PhD 1940[225] 1973 for "unusual ingenuity in designing experiments to explore the fundamental particles of matter and in designing and constructing the machines to produce the particles, culminating in the world's most powerful particle accelerator";[226] recipient of the 1984 Enrico Fermi Award for "his outstanding contributions to physics and particle accelerator designs and construction. He was the creator and principal designer of the Fermi National Laboratory and what is, at present, the highest energy accelerator in the world. His contributions have always been characterized by the greatest ingenuity and innovation and accomplished with grace and style."[227]
David J. Wineland BS 1965, PhD 1970 2007 "for his leadership in developing the science of laser cooling and manipulation of ions, with applications in precise measurements and standards, quantum computing, and fundamental tests of quantum mechanics; his major impact on the international scientific community through the training of scientists; and his outstanding publications."[228] also listed in §Nobel laureates
Chien-Shiung Wu PhD 1940 1975 "for her ingenious experiments that led to new and surprising understanding of the decay of the radioactive nucleus." [229] the "Chinese Madam Curie"[230]
Shing-Tung Yau Ph.D. 1971 1997 "for his fundamental contributions in mathematics and physics. Through his work, the understanding of basic geometric differential equations has been changed and he has expanded their role enormously within mathematics."[231] mathematician, recipient of the Fields Medal in 1982

National Medal of Technology[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year National Medal of Technology Citation Additional Notability
Frances H. Arnold PhD 1985 [8] 2011 "for pioneering research on biofuels and chemicals that could lead to the replacement of pollution-generating materials"[232] also listed in §Nobel laureates


Glen Culler BA Math 1951 1999 "for pioneering innovations in multiple branches of computing, including early efforts in digital speech processing, invention of the first on–line system for interactive graphical mathematics computing and pioneering work on the ARPAnet"[233]
Doug Engelbart B. Eng. 1952, Ph.D. 1965 2000 "for creating the foundations of personal computing including continuous, real–time interaction based on cathode–ray tube displays and the mouse, hypertext linking, text editing, on–line journals, shared–screen teleconferencing, and remote collaborative work. More than any other person, he created the personal computing component of the computer revolution."[234] also listed in §Turing Award laureates
Arthur Gossard PhD [235] 2014 "for innovation, development, and application of artificially structured quantum materials critical to ultrahigh performance semiconductor device technology used in today's digital infrastructure"[236]
Chenming Hu MS 1970, PhD 1973 [237] 2014 "for pioneering innovations in microelectronics including reliability technologies, the first industry–standard model for circuit design, and the first 3–dimensional transistors, which radically advanced semiconductor technology"[238] professor emeritus of EECS at UC Berkeley[239] ; co-founder and chairman of Celestry Design Technologies (acquired by Cadence Design Systems for over $100 million[240]); 2013 Phil Kaufman Award laureate
Gordon Moore B.S. 1950 1990 "for his seminal leadership in bringing American industry the two major postwar innovations in microelectronics – large–scale integrated memory and the microprocessor – that have fueled the information revolution."[241] co–founder of NASDAQ–100 company Intel, namesake and originator of Moore's Law, co–founder of NASDAQ–100 semiconductor manufacturing company Intel
Ken Thompson B.S. EE 1965, M.S. EE 1966 1998 for the "invention of the UNIX® operating system and the C programming language, which together have led to enormous growth of an entire industry, thereby enhancing American leadership in the Information Age."[242] Co–creator of the Unix operating system ; also listed in §Turing Award laureates
Steve Wozniak (class of 1976, BS EECS 1986) 1985 for the "development and introduction of the personal computer which has sparked the birth of a new industry extending the power of the computer to individual users."[243] co–founder of NASDAQ–100 computer manufacturing company Apple Inc.; also listed in §Founders and co–founders

Breakthrough Prize[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year Award Field Breakthrough Prize Citation Additional Notability
Nima Arkani-Hamed PhD 1997 2012 Physics "for original approaches to outstanding problems in particle physics, including the proposal of large extra dimensions, new theories for the Higgs boson, novel realizations of supersymmetry, theories for dark matter, and the exploration of new mathematical structures in gauge theory scattering amplitudes." [244] theoretical physicist, faculty member of the Institute for Advance Study (Princeton, New Jersey), director of the Center For Future High Energy Physics in Beijing, China; professor (1999–2001) at UC Berkeley[245]
Harry F. Noller BS 1960 Biochemistry [246] 2017 Life Sciences "for discovering the centrality of RNA in forming the active centers of the ribosome, the fundamental machinery of protein synthesis in all cells, thereby connecting modern biology to the origin of life and also explaining how many natural antibiotics disrupt protein synthesis."[247] biochemist, Director of the Center for the Molecular Biology of RNA at the University of California, Santa Cruz [248]
Saul Perlmutter PhD Physics 1986 2015 Physics "for the most unexpected discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, rather than slowing as had been long assumed."[249] also listed in §Nobel laureates
Joseph Polchinski PhD 1980 2017 Physics "for transformative advances in quantum field theory, string theory, and quantum gravity."[250]
Gary Ruvkun BA Biophysics 1971 2015 Life Sciences "for discovering a new world of genetic regulation by microRNAs, a class of tiny RNA molecules that inhibit translation or destabilize complementary mRNA targets."[251] also listed in §Wolf Prize
Andrew Strominger MA 1979 2012 Physics "for transformative advances in quantum field theory, string theory, and quantum gravity."[252]

Gödel Prize[edit]

Name Degree(s) Award Year Gödel Prize Citation Additional Notability
Sanjeev Arora Ph.D. 1994 2001 "for the PCP theorem and its applications to hardness of approximation" [253] professor of computer science at Princeton University
2010 for the "discovery of a polynomial–time approximation scheme (PTAS) for the Euclidean Travelling Salesman Problem (ETSP)") [254]
Ronald Fagin PhD Math 1973 [255] 2014 "for Optimal Aggregation Algorithms for Middleware"[256] IBM Fellow at IBM Research–Almaden
Matthew K. Franklin MA Math 1985 2013 "established the field of pairing–based cryptography by supplying a precise definition of the security of this approach, and providing compelling new applications for it." [257] professor of computer science at UC Davis
Shafi Goldwasser MS 1981, Ph.D. 1983 1993 "for the development of interactive proof systems" [258] RSA Professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, professor of mathematical sciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science; also listed in Turing Award laureates section
2001 "for the PCP theorem and its applications to hardness of approximation"[253]
Silvio Micali Ph.D. 1982 1993 "for the development of interactive proof systems"[258] also listed in Turing Award laureates section
Rajeev Motwani Ph.D. 1988 2001 "for the PCP theorem and its applications to hardness of approximation"[253] former professor of computer science at Stanford University; co–author of a research paper on the PageRank algorithm (with Larry Page, Sergey Brin, and Terry Winograd) which became the basis of Google;[259]
Moni Naor PhD 1989 CS [260] 2014 for Optimal Aggregation Algorithms for Middleware[256] professor of computer science at the Weizmann Institute of Science (in Israel);
Noam Nisan PhD 1988[261][262] 2014 for laying the foundations of algorithmic game theory[263]
Madhu Sudan Ph.D. 1992 2001 "for the PCP theorem and its applications to hardness of approximation"[253] professor of computer science at MIT

MacArthur Fellowship[edit]

The MacArthur Fellowship is also known as the "Genius Grant"[264][265][266] or "Genius Award"[267][268]

Name Degree(s) Award Year Additional Notability


Joan Abrahamson J.D. 1985 [269] President of the Jefferson Institute (a public policy think–tank)
Patrick Awuah M.B.A. 1999 2015 [270][271] founder of Ashesi University in Ghana
Carolyn Bertozzi Ph.D. 1993 1999 [272] T.Z. and Irmgard Chu Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley
Peter J. Bickel Ph.D. 1963 1984 [273][274] professor of statistics at UC Berkeley
Tami Bond M.S. 1995 2014[275] environmental engineer; Professor Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
Shawn Carlson B.S. 1981 1999 [264] co–founder of Society for Amateur Scientists, former columnist of "The Amateur Scientist" in Scientific American; "Head Cheese" of the LabRats Science Education Project (a "Boy Scouts" for young scientists)
John Carlstrom Ph.D. 1988 1998 [267] professor of astrophysics at the University of Chicago
Stanley Cavell B.A. 1947 1992 [276] philosopher, Walter M. Cabot Professor Emeritus at Harvard University
Sandy Close B.A. 1964 1995 [277] journalist, Executive Director of the Bay Area Institute/Pacific News Service and New America Media
Gary Cohen attended as graduate student 1983–1984 2015 [270][278] co–founder and president of Health Care Without Harm in Reston, Virginia
Eric Coleman Masters of Public Health 1991 2012 [279] geriatrician, professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine
Maria Crawford Ph.D. 1964 1993 [280] professor emeritus of geology at Bryn Mawr College
William Dichtel Ph.D. Chemistry 2005 2015 [270][281] professor of chemistry and chemical biology at Cornell University; pioneer[281] of covalent organic frameworks
Corinne Dufka M.A. social welfare 1984 2003 [282][283] human rights investigator, senior researcher in the Africa Division of Human Rights Watch
Michael Elowitz B.A. physics 1992 2007 [284] molecular biologist, professor at the California Institute of Technology; creator of the repressilator (artificial genetic circuit in synthetic biology)
Jon H. Else B.A. 1968 1988 [285] Prix Italia recipient (The Day After Trinity), recipient of four Emmy Awards,[89] nominated twice for the Academy Award, 1999 winner of the Sundance Film Festival Filmmaker's Trophy, cinematographer on the Academy Award–winning Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids?, professor of journalism at UC Berkeley (also listed in Emmy Awards section)
Deborah Estrin BS EECS 1980 2018 [286][287] associate dean and professor of computer science at Cornell University; pioneer in computer network routing
Daniel Friedan Ph.D. 1980 1987 [288] physicist in string theory and condensed matter physics, professor of physics at Rutgers University
Margaret J. Geller B.A. physics 1970 1990 [289] astrophysicist at the Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Peter Gleick M.S. and Ph.D. hydro–climatology 2003[290] co–founder of the Pacific Institute, researcher on fresh water resources
David B. Goldstein Ph.D. physics 2002 [291] energy conservation specialist, co–director of the Energy Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council
Linda Griffith Ph.D. 1988 2006 [292] professor of bioengineering at MIT
David Gross Ph.D. physics 1966 1987 [293] Nobel laureate (Physics, 2004) (also listed in Nobel laureates section)
Eva Harris Ph.D. 1993 1997 [294][295] professor in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley; researcher of dengue fever
Peter J. Hayes Ph.D. 1989 2000 [296][297] energy policy activist, Executive Director of the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainability
Vijay Iyer Ph.D. 1998 2013[298] jazz pianist and composer
Daniel Hunt Janzen Ph.D. 1965 1989 [299] ecologist and conservationist; professor of biology at the University of Pennsylvania, technical advisor for restoration project Area de Conservación Guanacaste World Heritage Site in Costa Rica
Daniel Jurafsky B.A. 1983, Ph.D. 1992 2002 [300] computer scientist and linguist; professor of linguistics and computer science at the University of Colorado, Boulder
Nancy Kopell M.A., Ph.D. 1967 1990[301][302] mathematician, William Fairfield Warren Distinguished Professor at Boston University, Co–Director of the Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technology
Josh Kun Ph.D. 1999 2016[303][304] musicologist
Michael C. Malin B.A. (physics) 1967 1987 [305] astronomer, principal investigator for the camera on Mars Global Surveyor,[306] founder and CEO of Malin Space Science Systems, recipient of a NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 2002,[305] recipient of the 2005 Carl Sagan Memorial Award[305]
Yoky Matsuoka B.S. 1993 2007 [307] neuro–robotics researcher, Vice President of Technology at Tony Fadell "smart–thermostat" company Nest Labs[308] when it was acquired by Google for $3.2 billion;[309] founding member of Google X
Maurice Lim Miller B.S. 1968, M.A. 1977 2012[310] founder of the poverty assistance institute Family Independence Initiative in Oakland, California
David R. Montgomery Ph.D. 1991 2008[311] geomorphologist, Professor of Earth and Space Science at the University of Washington, Seattle; researcher on the role of topsoil in human civilization, recipient of the 2008 Washington State Book Award in General Nonfiction for 'Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations'
Richard A. Muller Ph.D. 1982 [312] professor of Physics at UC Berkeley, senior scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Cecilia Muñoz M.A. 1986 2000 [265][313] civil rights and immigration activist; director of the United States Domestic Policy Council (2012–present)
Margaret Murnane Ph.D. 1989 2000 [314] professor of physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder, specialist in pulsed–operation lasers
Viet Thanh Nguyen B.A. 1992, Ph.D. 1997 2017 [315] author (also listed in §Pulitzer Prize)
John Novembre Ph.D. 2006 2015 [270][316] computational biologist and professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago
Trevor Paglen B.A. 1998, Ph.D. 2008 2017 [317] artist, author, and geographer specializing in mass surveillance and data collection
Margie Profet B.A. physics 1985 1993 [318] researcher in evolutionary biology
Peter H. Raven B.S. 1957 1985 [319][320] botanist and environmentalist, President Emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden (also listed in National Medal of Science)
Ed Roberts B.A. 1964, M.A. 1966 1984 [321] activist in the disability rights movement (Independent Living)
Julia Hall Bowman Robinson B.A. mathematics 1940, Ph.D. 1948 1983[322] professor (1976–1985) of mathematics at UC Berkeley, specializing in Hilbert's Tenth Problem; first woman president of the American Mathematical Society;[323] namesake of the Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute
Jay Rubenstein Ph.D. 1997 2007 [324] medieval historian, professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Yuval Sharon B.A. 2001 2017 [325] opera director and producer
Daniel P. Schrag Ph.D 1993 2000 [266] Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University
John Henry Schwarz Ph.D. 1966 1987 [326] the "Schwarz" in the "Green–Schwarz mechanism" that started the first superstring revolution in superstring theory,[327] Harold Brown Professor of Theoretical Physics at Caltech[328]
Allan Sly PhD 2009 Statistics 2018[329] faculty member at the Department of Statistics at UC Berkeley (2011-2016) [287]; current professor of mathematics at Princeton University
Dawn Song Ph.D. 2002 2010 [330] professor in EECS at UC Berkeley specializing in computer security
Claire Tomlin Ph.D. 1998 2006 [331] researcher in unmanned aerial vehicles, air traffic control, and modeling of biological processes; professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Department of Electrical Engineering, at Stanford University, where she is Director of the Hybrid Systems Laboratory; professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at University of California, Berkeley
Gary Alfred Tomlinson Ph.D. 1979 1988[332] musicologist and cultural theorist, professor at Yale University, former Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania;[333]
Philip Treisman Ph.D. 1985 1992 [334] Professor of Mathematics at the University of Texas, Austin; pioneer in the Emerging Scholars Program
Bret Wallach B.A. 1964, M.A. 1966, Ph.D. in 1968 1984 [335] cultural geographer, professor at the University of Oklahoma
Robert Penn Warren M.A. 1927 1981 novelist and poet, three–time recipient of the Pulitzer Prize;[111] (also listed in Pulitzer Prize section)
Robert H. Williams Ph.D. 1967 1993 [336][337] physicist, Senior Research Scientist at the Princeton Environmental Institute at Princeton University
Allan Wilson Ph.D. 1961 1986 [268] professor (1972–1991) of Biochemistry at UC Berkeley specializing in molecular approaches to understand biological evolution and to reconstruct phylogenies
Jay Wright B.A. 1961 1986 poet[338]
Gene Luen Yang BS CS 1995 2016 [339][303] cartoonist and graphic novelist; fifth National Ambassador for Young People's Literature;[340]
Shing–Tung Yau Ph.D. 1971 1984 [341] mathematician (listed under Fields Medal section)
Xiaowei Zhuang MS 1993, Ph.D. 1996 2003[342] biophysicist, professor of chemistry and chemical Biology at Harvard University

Academia[edit]

Arts and media[edit]

Athletics[edit]

Business and entrepreneurship[edit]

See also: Science and technology, Haas School of Business

Politics and government[edit]

Religion, spirituality, and lifestyle[edit]

Science and technology[edit]

See also: Academia, Business, UC Berkeley College of Chemistry, Law

Fictional[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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