List of Vancouver Canucks award winners

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Vancouver Canucks awards
Image alt text.
Henrik Sedin accepting the Clarence S. Campbell Bowl in 2011
Award Wins
Clarence S. Campbell Bowl
3
Presidents' Trophy
2
Art Ross Trophy
2
Calder Memorial Trophy
1
Frank J. Selke Trophy
1
General Manager of the Year Award
1
Hart Memorial Trophy
1
Jack Adams Award
2
King Clancy Memorial Trophy
2
NHL Fan Fav Award *
1
NHL Foundation Player Award
1
NHL Man of the Year Award *
1
NHL Plus-Minus Award *
1
Ted Lindsay Award
2
William M. Jennings Trophy
1
Total
Awards won 22

The Vancouver Canucks are a Canadian professional ice hockey team based in Vancouver, British Columbia. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Canucks joined the league in 1970–71 season as an expansion team, along with the Buffalo Sabres.

In their history, the team has captured the Clarence S. Campbell Bowl as Western Conference champions in 1982, 1994 and 2011, but lost in their three Stanley Cup appearances to the New York Islanders, New York Rangers and Boston Bruins, respectively.[1] The Sedin twins have won a combined four awards.[2][3] Markus Naslund has played in five NHL All-Star Games, the most in Canucks history.

Four players have had their numbers retired by the Canucks organization. Stan Smyl became the first Canuck to have his #12 retired in 1991, followed by Trevor Linden's #16 in 2008, Markus Naslund's #19 in 2010 and Pavel Bure's #10 in 2013. Although they have been recognized for their accomplishments with different teams, Igor Larionov, Cam Neely, Mark Messier, Mats Sundin and Pavel Bure are several Hockey Hall of Famers who have played for the Canucks during their careers; former owner Frank Griffiths, coach Roger Neilson and general managers Bud Poile and Jake Milford have been inducted as builders.

The Canucks have six internal team awards – the Molson Cup is awarded to the player who earns the most three-star selections throughout the season; the Cyclone Taylor Trophy i given to the team's most valuable player; Cyrus H. McLean Trophy recognizes the Canucks' leading scorer; the Babe Pratt Trophy is given to the best Canucks defenceman; the Fred J. Hume Award is awarded to the Canucks' unsung hero; and the Pavel Bure Most Exciting Player Award is awarded to the player judged to be the most exciting on the team. Each of these awards are presented towards the end of the season.

League awards[edit]

Team trophies[edit]

The Canucks have won the Western (previously the Campbell) Conference three times, in the 1982, 1994 and 2011 seasons.

Team trophies awarded to the Vancouver Canucks[4]
Award Description Times won Seasons References
Clarence S. Campbell Bowl Western Conference playoff championship 3 1981–82, 1993–94, 2010–11 [5][6]
Presidents' Trophy Most regular season points 2 2010–11, 2011–12 [7][8]

Individual awards[edit]

In their first 21 years, Vancouver Canucks players and staff were not able to win a major individual NHL award until the 1991–92 NHL season. In that year, Pavel Bure won the Calder Memorial Trophy as the league's rookie of the year and Pat Quinn won the Jack Adams Award as coach of the year. Since the 1991–92 season, Canucks players and staff have won an additional 14 individual NHL awards, winning the most awards in the 2010–11 season, with five. The two most decorated Canucks players are Daniel and Henrik Sedin. The Sedins have won a combined four awards, including the Ted Lindsay Award, the Hart Memorial Trophy and becoming the first brother duo to win back-to-back Art Ross Trophies.

The Sedins became the first brother duo to win the Art Ross Trophy in consecutive years.
Trevor Linden has won two NHL humanitarian awards as a Canuck.
Individual awards won by Vancouver Canucks players and staff[4]
Award Description Winner Season References
Art Ross Trophy Regular season scoring champion Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin 2009–10 [9][10]
Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin 2010–11
Calder Memorial Trophy Rookie of the year Bure, PavelPavel Bure 1991–92 [11][12]
Frank J. Selke Trophy Forward who best excels in the defensive aspect of the game Kesler, RyanRyan Kesler 2010–11 [13][14]
General Manager of the Year Award Top general manager Gillis, MikeMike Gillis 2010–11 [15]
Hart Memorial Trophy Most Valuable Player during the regular season Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin 2009–10 [16][17]
Jack Adams Award Top coach during the regular season Quinn, PatPat Quinn 1991–92 [18]
Vigneault, AlainAlain Vigneault 2006–07
King Clancy Memorial Trophy Leadership qualities on and off the ice and humanitarian contributions within their community Linden, TrevorTrevor Linden 1996–97 [19][20]
Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin 2015–16
NHL Foundation Player Award Community service Linden, TrevorTrevor Linden 2007–08 [21]
NHL Man of the Year Award Sportsmanship and involvement with charitable groups Walter, RyanRyan Walter 1991–92 [22]
NHL Plus-Minus Award Highest plus/minus Malik, MarekMarek Malik 2003–04 [23]
Scotiabank Fan Fav Award Awarded to a National Hockey League player based on fan voting Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongo 2008–09 [24][25]
Ted Lindsay Award Most outstanding player during the regular season Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund 2002–03 [26]
Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin 2010–11
William M. Jennings Trophy Fewest goals given up in the regular season Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongo 2010–11 [27][28]
Schneider, CoryCory Schneider

All-Stars[edit]

NHL First and Second Team All-Stars[edit]

The NHL First and Second Team All-Stars consists of the top players at each position as voted on by the Professional Hockey Writers' Association.[29]

Vancouver Canucks selected to the NHL First and Second Team All-Stars[29][30][31]
Player Position Selections Season Team
Bertuzzi, ToddTodd Bertuzzi Right Wing 1 2002–03 1st
Bure, PavelPavel Bure Right Wing 1 1993–94 1st
Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongo Goaltender 1 2006–07 2nd
McLean, KirkKirk McLean Goaltender 1 1991–92 2nd
Mogilny, AlexanderAlexander Mogilny Right Wing 1 1995–96 2nd
Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Left Wing 3 2001–02 1st
2002–03 1st
2003–04 1st
Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin Left Wing 2 2009–10 2nd
2010–11 1st
Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin Centre 2 2009–10 1st
2010–11 1st

NHL All-Rookie Team[edit]

The NHL All-Rookie Team consists of the top rookies at each position as voted on by the Professional Hockey Writers' Association.[32]

Vancouver Canucks selected to the NHL All-Rookie Team[31][32]
Player Position Season
Hirsch, CoreyCorey Hirsch Goaltender 1995–96
Linden, TrevorTrevor Linden Forward 1988–89
Ohlund, MattiasMattias Ohlund Defence 1997–98
Sandlak, JimJim Sandlak Forward 1986–87

All-Star Game selections[edit]

The National Hockey League All-Star Game is a mid-season exhibition game held annually between many of the top players of each season. Thirty-nine All-Star Games have been held since the Canucks' inaugural season. The All-Star Game has not been held in various years: 1995, 2005 and 2013 as a result of labour stoppages; 2006, 2010 and 2014 because of the Winter Olympics; 1979 and 1987 due to the 1979 Challenge Cup; and the Rendez-vous '87 series between the NHL and the Soviet national team.[33] The NHL also held a Young Stars Game for first- and second-year players from 2002 to 2009.

The Canucks hosted the 1977 All-Star Game at the Pacific Coliseum and the 1998 NHL All-Star Game at General Motors Place. In 1977, Harold Snepsts was the lone Canucks representative as the Wales Conference defeated the Campbell Conference 4–3 in front of 15,607 in attendance. In 1998, both Mark Messier and Pavel Bure were the two Canucks representatives at the All-Star Game, with Messier playing for the North America All-Stars and Bure with the World All-Stars. Team North America won the game 8–7 in front of a sold-out crowd of 18,422. Currently, Markus Naslund played a franchise-high five All-Star Games as a member of the Canucks.

Markus Naslund participated in five NHL All-Star Games as a Canuck.
Pavel Bure participated in four NHL All-Star Games as a Canuck.
  • dagger Selected by fan vote[34]
Vancouver Canucks players and coaches selected to the All-Star Game[31]
Game Year Name Position References
24th 1971 Tallon, DaleDale Tallon Defence [35]
25th 1972 Tallon, DaleDale Tallon Defence [36]
26th 1973 Schmautz, BobbyBobby Schmautz Right Wing [37]
27th 1974 Guevremont, JocelynJocelyn Guevremont Defence [38]
Schmautz, BobbyBobby Schmautz Right Wing
28th 1975 Pratt, TracyTracy Pratt Defence [39]
Smith, GaryGary Smith Goaltender
29th 1976 Ververgaert, DennisDennis Ververgaert Right Wing [40]
30th 1977 Snepsts, HaroldHarold Snepsts Defence [41]
31st 1978 Ververgaert, DennisDennis Ververgaert Right Wing [42]
32nd 1980 Lindgren, LarsLars Lindgren Defence [43]
33rd 1981 McCarthy, KevinKevin McCarthy Defence [44]
Williams, TigerTiger Williams Left Wing
34th 1982 Snepsts, HaroldHarold Snepsts Defence [45]
35th 1983 Brodeur, RichardRichard Brodeur (Did not play) Goaltender [46]
Garrett, JohnJohn Garrett (Replaced Brodeur) Goaltender
Neilson, RogerRoger Neilson Coach
36th 1984 Rota, DarcyDarcy Rota (Replaced Tanti) Left Wing [47]
Tanti, TonyTony Tanti (Did not play) Right Wing
37th 1985 Gradin, ThomasThomas Gradin Centre [48]
38th 1986 Tanti, TonyTony Tanti Right Wing [49]
39th 1988 Adams, GregGreg Adams Centre [50]
40th 1989 Reinhart, PaulPaul Reinhart Defence [51]
41st 1990 McLean, KirkKirk McLean Goaltender [52]
42nd 1991 Linden, TrevorTrevor Linden Right Wing [53]
43rd 1992 Linden, TrevorTrevor Linden Right Wing [54]
McLean, KirkKirk McLean Goaltender
44th 1993 Bure, PavelPavel Buredagger Right Wing [55]
45th 1994 Bure, PavelPavel Buredagger Right Wing [56]
46th 1996 Bure, PavelPavel Buredagger (Did not play) Right Wing [57]
Mogilny, AlexanderAlexander Mogilny Right Wing
47th 1997 Bure, PavelPavel Bure Right Wing [58]
48th 1998 Bure, PavelPavel Bure Right Wing [59]
Messier, MarkMark Messier Centre
49th 1999 Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Right Wing [60]
Ohlund, MattiasMattias Ohlund Defence
50th 2000 Messier, MarkMark Messier Centre [61]
51st 2001 Jovanovski, EdEd Jovanovski Defence [62]
Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Left Wing
52nd 2002 Jovanovski, EdEd Jovanovski Defence [63]
Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Right Wing
53rd 2003 Bertuzzi, ToddTodd Bertuzzi Right Wing [64]
Crawford, MarcMarc Crawford Coach
Jovanovski, EdEd Jovanovski Defence
Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Left Wing
54th 2004 Bertuzzi, ToddTodd Bertuzzidagger Right Wing [65]
Crawford, MarcMarc Crawford Assistant coach
Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Left Wing
55th 2007 Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongodagger Goaltender [66]
56th 2008 Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongodagger (Did not play) Goaltender [67]
Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin Centre
57th 2009 Luongo, RobertoRoberto Luongo Goaltender [68]
58th 2011 Kesler, RyanRyan Kesler Centre [69]
Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin Left Wing
Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin Centre
Vigneault, AlainAlain Vigneault Coach
59th 2012 Edler, AlexanderAlexander Edler Defence [70]
Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin Left Wing
Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin Centre
60th 2015 Vrbata, RadimRadim Vrbata Right Wing [71]
61st 2016 Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin Left Wing [72]
62nd 2017 Horvat, BoBo Horvat Centre [73]

Career achievements[edit]

Hockey Hall of Fame[edit]

Before entering the NHL, the Vancouver Canucks of the WHL and PCHL had six notable players and one builder that was inducted to the Hockey Hall of Fame. The list of Hall of Famers included Andy Bathgate, Johnny Bower, Tony Esposito, Allan Stanley, Gump Worsley and former owner Fred J. Hume, who was inducted under the Builders category. Bill Cowley was also inducted as a player, although his only affiliation with the Canucks was general manager and head coach in 1948–49.

Since entering the NHL in 1970, several members of the Vancouver Canucks organization have been honoured by the Hockey Hall of Fame. Cam Neely was the first Canucks player inducted, gaining election in 2005, although the majority of Neely's career and success was spent with the Boston Bruins. Within the next three years, Mark Messier would also be inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2007, along with Igor Larionov in 2008 and Mats Sundin in 2012, though their career accomplishments were well known on other teams.

To this date, Pavel Bure is the only Hall of Famer to spend the majority of his playing career with the Canucks. Known for his skating ability, the "Russian Rocket" spent seven seasons in Vancouver, accumulating 478 points (254 goals and 224 assists) in 428 games, winning the Calder Memorial Trophy as rookie of the year in 1992, being named an NHL First All-Star in 1994 and participated in four NHL All-Star Games. He is also the current club record holder for most points by a rookie in a season (60), most goals in a season (60; (both 1992–93 and 1993–94) and club holder of most shorthanded goals (24). However, Bure will always be best remembered for his play during the 1994 Stanley Cup playoffs when he led the Canucks with 16 goals and 31 points, helping the team reach the Finals only to lose the Stanley Cup to the New York Rangers in seven games.

Five members of team management have been inducted in the "Builders" category. Two former general managers, Bud Poile and Jake Milford, were the first two members inducted into the Hall of Fame. Poile was the Canucks' first general manager in 1970 and was inducted in 1990, while Milford became general manager from 1977 to 1982, building the team that went to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1982. Milford served as the club's senior vice-president until his sudden death on December 24, 1984, which occurred one month after his induction.

Long-time owner Frank Griffiths would be the third Canucks builder to be inducted in 1993. Griffiths was the majority owner of the Canucks from 1974 until his death in 1994.

Roger Neilson statue commemorating the towel power event in 1982

In 2002, Former head coach Roger Neilson became the fourth Canucks builder to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Neilson started as an assistant coach, but eventually took over the coaching duties in March 1982 after coach Harry Neale was suspended for taking part in an altercation with fans during a brawl in Quebec. In that same year, Neilson led the Canucks to the Finals and in Game 2 of the Campbell Conference Finals against the Chicago Blackhawks; he felt his team was unfairly penalized on several occasions during the third period and took a trainer's white towel and held it on a hockey stick, as if to say, "I give up." Three other Canuck players did the same thing, and all were ejected from the game. By doing so, Neilson inadvertently started a Canucks playoff tradition known as "Towel Power."

The third general manager and fifth builder to be inducted into the Hall of Fame was Pat Quinn who served as Canucks' general manager for ten years with four of those years as head coach. Quinn, was known for building the Canucks to respectability during the early nineties as the team finished with back-to-back division titles in 1992 and 1993, and were one win away from winning the Stanley Cup in 1994. That success was due in part with the trades that Pat Quinn started in 1987 when his first move was obtaining a young goaltender, Kirk McLean and left winger, Greg Adams from the New Jersey Devils and picking two notable drafts with future captain, Trevor Linden in 1988 and future superstar, Pavel Bure in 1989. He later strengthened the team by making trades to acquire Geoff Courtnall, Cliff Ronning, Sergio Momesso and Robert Dirk from the St. Louis Blues in 1991, which paved the way for the team's success. His other most notable trade came in the 1996 season when he traded Alek Stojanov to the Pittsburgh Penguins in exchange for Markus Naslund, which is seen as one of the leagues' most lopsided trades as Naslund became a superstar player in the NHL during the 2000s and was part of the famed West Coast Express line with Todd Bertuzzi and Brendan Morrison.

Vancouver Canucks inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame[74]
Individual Category Year inducted Years with Canucks References
Bure, PavelPavel Bure Player 2012 1991–1998 [75]
Griffiths, FrankFrank Griffiths Builder 1993 1974–1994 [76]
Larionov, IgorIgor Larionov Player 2008 1989–1992 [77]
Messier, MarkMark Messier Player 2007 1997–2000 [78]
Milford, JakeJake Milford Builder 1984 1977–1984 [79]
Neely, CamCam Neely Player 2005 1983–1986 [80]
Neilson, RogerRoger Neilson Builder 2002 1981–1984 [81]
Poile, BudBud Poile Builder 1990 1970–1973 [82]
Quinn, PatPat Quinn Builder 2016 1970–1972, 1987–1997 [83]
Sundin, MatsMats Sundin Player 2012 2008–2009 [84]

Foster Hewitt Memorial Award[edit]

One member of the Canucks organization has been honored with the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award. Former Canucks radio and television broadcaster Jim Robson was named the recipient of the award in 1992 mostly for his years of service on the team's broadcasts. Robson was the radio voice of the Canucks from 1970 to 1994 and continued to work their television broadcasts until 1999. Robson also did additional work with CBC Television's Hockey Night in Canada, calling three All-Star Games, parts of four Stanley Cup Finals and is probably best remembered for his call of Bob Nystrom's Stanley Cup-winning overtime goal for the New York Islanders in 1980.[85]

Members of the Vancouver Canucks honored with the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award
Individual Year honored Years with Canucks as broadcaster
Robson, JimJim Robson 1992 1970–1999

Retired numbers[edit]

Stan Smyl's #12 banner at Rogers Arena.

The Vancouver Canucks have retired four numbers. The Canucks retired #12 in honour of Stan Smyl who played right wing for the Canucks from 1978 to 1991. Trevor Linden's #16 was retired in 2008, and was recognized as "Captain Canuck" during his 17 years with the Canucks from 1988–98 and 2001–08. Markus Naslund's #19 was retired in 2010, and is the current Canuck record holder for most goals, most powerplay goals, and tied with the most hat tricks during his tenure with the Vancouver Canucks. NHL Hall of Famer Pavel Bure's #10 was retired in 2013, and is the current single-season club record holder for most points by a rookie in a season (60), most goals in a season (60; both 1992–93 and 1993–94) and current club holder of most short handed goals (24). Also out of circulation is the number 99 which was retired league-wide for Wayne Gretzky on February 6, 2000.[86] Gretzky did not play for the Canucks during his 20-year NHL career and no Canucks player had ever worn the number 99 prior to its retirement.[87][88]

Vancouver Canucks retired numbers
Number Player Position Years with Canucks as a player Date of retirement ceremony References
10 Bure, PavelPavel Bure Right Wing 1991–1998 November 2, 2013 [89]
12 Smyl, StanStan Smyl Right Wing 1978–1991 November 3, 1991 [90]
16 Linden, TrevorTrevor Linden Right Wing 1988–1998, 2001–2008 December 17, 2008 [90]
19 Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund Left Wing 1996–2008 December 11, 2010 [89]

Taken out of circulation[edit]

The Vancouver Canucks have also unofficially retired three numbers within their organization as remembrance to players whose playing careers were cut short tragically. Wayne Maki played left wing for the Canucks from 1970–73, and was one of the team's leading scorers in the franchises first two seasons. He was diagnosed with brain cancer in December 1972 and died at the age of 29 in 1974.[91] Since then, Mark Messier has been the only Canuck to wear #11 in his brief stint with the Canucks.

Luc Bourdon died in a motorcycle accident on May 29, 2008, near his hometown of Shippagan, New Brunswick.[92] At the 2008–09 season opener, the Canucks honoured Bourdon with a pre-game ceremony and his last game-worn jersey was presented to his family by the fan who won the jersey during an annual charity event the previous season. Afterwards, Tom Cochrane and Red Rider performed "Big League" during the video tribute. The Canucks also wore "LB" on their helmets that season in memory of Bourdon and the Luc Bourdon Wall of Dreams was established to commemorate Bourdon at General Motors Place.

Rick Rypien was found dead in his home in Crowsnest Pass, Alberta, on August 15, 2011, and the cause of death was later confirmed as suicide. Although he joined the Winnipeg Jets in the offseason as an unrestricted free agent, the Canucks honored Rypien's memory early in the 2011–12 season with a video entitled "Heart of a Canuck" and an homage to Rypien was worn on the back of all Canucks helmets for the entirety of the 2011–12 season.

Pavol Demitra played three seasons with the Vancouver Canucks until he was an unrestricted free agent after the 2009–10 NHL season. It was also his final season in the NHL as he signed with the KHL's Lokomotiv Yaroslavl on July 15, 2010, and finished as the team's top scorer in the 2011 season. In his second season in the KHL, Demitra would die tragically in a plane crash along with the entire Lokomotiv team on September 7, 2011, as they were heading to play their next road game. Since the tragedy, the Vancouver Canucks have removed his number 38 out of circulation in honour of Pavol Demitra.

Vancouver Canucks unofficially retired numbers
Number Player Position Years with Canucks as a player Out of circulation since References
11 Maki, WayneWayne Maki Left Wing 1970–1973 1974 [93]
28 Bourdon, LucLuc Bourdon Defence 2006–2008 2008 [94]
37 Rypien, RickRick Rypien Centre 2005–2011 2011 [94]
38 Demitra, PavolPavol Demitra Centre 2008–2010 2011 [citation needed]

Ring of Honour[edit]

At the start of their 40th season, the Vancouver Canucks decided to launch the Ring of Honour to celebrate and salute Canuck heroes who have made a lasting impact on the franchise.[95]

Members of the Vancouver Canucks inducted into the Ring of Honour[96]
Individual Primary roles Years with Canucks Date of induction ceremony References
Gradin, ThomasThomas Gradin Player 1978–1986 January 24, 2011 [97]
Kurtenbach, OrlandOrland Kurtenbach Player, Coach 1970–1974, 1976–1978 October 26, 2010 [98]
McLean, KirkKirk McLean Player 1987–1998 November 24, 2010 [99]
Ohlund, MattiasMattias Ohlund Player 1997–2009 December 16, 2016 [100]
Quinn, PatPat Quinn Player, Coach, Executive 1970–1972, 1987–1997 April 13, 2014 [101]
Snepsts, HaroldHarold Snepsts Player 1974–1984, 1988–1990 March 14, 2011 [102]

Team awards[edit]

Babe Pratt Trophy[edit]

The Babe Pratt Trophy is given to the best Canucks defenceman, as voted by the fans.[103] The trophy is presented at the last home game of the regular season. It was first awarded for the 1972–73 season as the Premier's Trophy, but as of the 1989–90 season, after the untimely death of Hockey Hall of Fame defenceman and Canucks goodwill ambassador Babe Pratt, the trophy was renamed in honour of him. Mattias Ohlund, Jyrki Lumme, Doug Lidster and Harold Snepsts have won the award four times.

Cyclone Taylor Trophy[edit]

The Cyclone Taylor Trophy is the award given each year to the most valuable player on the Vancouver Canucks as selected by the fans.[103] It is named after Cyclone Taylor, a Canadian professional ice hockey forward who led the Vancouver Millionaires to the Stanley Cup in 1915. The award was dedicated to him prior to the 1979–80 Canucks season, the season after his death on June 9, 1979, although an award for the Canucks MVP has existed since the team's inauguration in 1970. Markus Naslund has won the award five times.

Cyrus H. McLean Trophy[edit]

The Cyrus H. McLean Trophy was named after Cyrus H. McLean who was the former team President of the WHL Vancouver Canucks from 1968–70. The trophy was first awarded in the Canucks first season, which recognizes the Canucks leading scorer over the course of the regular season.[103] Markus Naslund has won the award the most times, leading the Canucks in scoring seven consecutive years, from 1999 to 2006.

Fred J. Hume Award[edit]

The Fred J. Hume Award is named after Fred J. Hume, who was the former mayor of Vancouver and owner of the Canucks while they were in the Western Hockey League. The team award is given out at the end of each NHL season to the team's unsung hero, as selected by fans. Before the 2016-2017 season, the winner was decided by the Vancouver Canucks Booster Club since the inaugural 1970–71 season.[31] Currently, four players have won the award twice.

Molson Cup[edit]

The Canucks are one of several teams in Canada that award the Molson Cup to the player who is named one of a game's top three players, or "three stars", most often over the course of the regular season.[104] Roberto Luongo has won the Molson Cup five times, the most in team history.

Pavel Bure Most Exciting Player Award[edit]

The Pavel Bure Most Exciting Player Award is given to the player judged to be the most exciting, as voted by the fans.[31] Tony Tanti and Pavel Bure have won the award five times.

Defunct team awards[edit]

President's Trophy[edit]

From 1974–75 to 1995–96, the President's Trophy was awarded to the Canucks' most valuable player. It was originally presented by CP Air and later Canadian Airlines and the player won a pair of airline tickets with the trophy. Obviously, many of the names match the Cyclone Taylor Trophy (also awarded to the MVP) and the trophy was retired after the 1996 season.[105]

Ram Tough Award[edit]

The Ram Tough Award was a short-lived award given to the most aggressive player of the Canucks, which was chosen by Canucks management. It was instituted by Pat Quinn at the start of his general manager duties in 1988–89. The winner of the award received a Dodge Ram truck until 1993–94 when the award was no longer in use.[106]

Other awards[edit]

Vancouver Canucks who have received non-NHL awards
Award Description Winner Season References
Charlie Conacher Humanitarian Award For humanitarian or community service projects Kurtenbach, OrlandOrland Kurtenbach 1971–72 [107]
Viking Award Most valuable Swedish player in NHL Gradin, ThomasThomas Gradin 1981–82 [108]
Sundstrom, PatrikPatrik Sundstrom 1983–84
Naslund, MarkusMarkus Naslund 2000–01
2002–03
2003–04
Sedin, HenrikHenrik Sedin 2009–10
Sedin, DanielDaniel Sedin 2010–11

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