List of Vice Presidents of the United States

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The Number One Observatory Circle in Washington, D.C. is the vice president's official residence.

There have been 47 vice presidents of the United States, from John Adams to Joe Biden. Originally, the Vice President was the person who received the second most votes for President in the Electoral College. However, in the election of 1800, a tie in the electoral college between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr led to the selection of the President by the House of Representatives. To prevent such an event from happening again, the Twelfth Amendment was added to the Constitution, creating the current system where electors cast a separate ballot for the vice presidency.[1]

The Vice President has few powers or duties explicitly provided for in the Constitution. The Vice President's primary function is to succeed to the presidency if the President dies, resigns, or is impeached and removed from office. Nine vice presidents have ascended to the presidency in this way: eight through the president's death, and one, Gerald Ford, through the president's resignation. In addition, the Vice President serves as the President of the Senate and may choose to cast a tie-breaking vote on decisions made by the Senate. Vice presidents have exercised this latter power to varying extents over the years.[1] The vice presidency was described by former VP John Nance Garner in 1960 as "not worth a bucket of warm piss".[2]

Prior to passage of the Twenty-fifth Amendment, a vacancy in the office of the Vice President could not be filled until the next post-election inauguration. Such vacancies were common; sixteen occurred before the 25th Amendment was ratified–as a result of seven deaths, one resignation (John C. Calhoun, who resigned to enter Congress), and eight cases in which the vice president succeeded to the presidency. This amendment allowed for a vacancy to be filled with appointment by the President and confirmation by both chambers of the U.S. Congress. Since the Amendment's passage, two vice presidents have been appointed through this process, Gerald Ford of Michigan in 1973 and Nelson Rockefeller of New York in 1974.[1] The office has been vacant for 13,800 days since the beginning of the United States federal government, or for approximately 37 years and 10 months. To date, 14 vice presidents became president, five of whom via election.[citation needed]

The vice presidents have hailed from 21 states. More than half of them have come from just five states, New York (11), Indiana (5), Massachusetts (4), Kentucky (3), and Texas (3). Most vice presidents have been in their 50s or 60s and had political experience prior to assuming the office.[1] The youngest person to become Vice President was John C. Breckinridge at 36 years of age, while the oldest was Alben W. Barkley at 71 years of age.

List of vice presidents[edit]

      Federalist (1)       Democratic-Republican (6)       Democratic (19)       Whig (2)       Republican (20)

No. Portrait Vice President State Term of office Party Term
[n 1]
Previous office President
1 JohnAdams 2nd US President.jpg    John Adams
October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826
(aged 90)
Massachusetts April 21, 1789
March 4, 1797
None 1
(1789)
United States Minister
to the
Court of St. James's
  Washington
   Federalist 2
(1792)
2 Rembrandt Peale - Thomas Jefferson - Google Art Project.jpg    Thomas Jefferson
April 13, 1743 – July 4, 1826
(aged 83)
Virginia March 4, 1797
March 4, 1801
Democratic-
Republican
3
(1796)
1st
United States Secretary of State
   J. Adams
3 Vanderlyn Burr.jpg    Aaron Burr
February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836
(aged 80)
New York March 4, 1801
March 4, 1805
Democratic-
Republican
4
(1800)
U.S. Senator from New York Jefferson
4 George Clinton by Ezra Ames.jpg    George Clinton
July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812
(aged 72)
New York March 4, 1805
April 20, 1812
Democratic-
Republican
5
(1804)
1st
Governor of New York
6
(1808)
Madison
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
April 20, 1812
March 4, 1813
5 Elbridge-gerry-painting.jpg    Elbridge Gerry
July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814
(aged 70)
Massachusetts March 4, 1813
November 23, 1814
Democratic-
Republican
7
(1812)
9th
Governor of Massachusetts
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
November 23, 1814
March 4, 1817
6 Daniel D Tompins by John Wesley Jarvis.jpg    Daniel D. Tompkins
June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825
(aged 50)
New York March 4, 1817
March 4, 1825
Democratic-
Republican
8
(1816)
Governor of New York Monroe
9
(1820)
7 George Peter Alexander Healy - John C. Calhoun - Google Art Project.jpg    John C. Calhoun
March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850
(aged 68)
South Carolina March 4, 1825
December 28, 1832
Democratic-
Republican
10
(1824)
10th
United States Secretary of War
J.Q. Adams
Democratic 11
(1828)
Jackson
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by resignation)
December 28, 1832
March 4, 1833
8 Francis Alexander - Martin Van Buren - Google Art Project.jpg Martin Van Buren
December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862
(aged 79)
New York March 4, 1833
March 4, 1837
Democratic 12
(1832)
United States Minister
to the
Court of St. James's
9 RichardMentorJohnson.jpg Richard Mentor Johnson
October 17, 1780/81 – November 19, 1850
(aged 70)
Kentucky March 4, 1837
March 4, 1841
Democratic 13
(1836)
U.S. Representative for
Kentucky's 13th
Van Buren
10 John Tyler by James Reid Lambdin, 1841.png John Tyler
March 29, 1790 – January 18, 1862
(aged 71)
Virginia March 4, 1841
April 4, 1841
Whig 14
(1840)
U.S. Senator from Virginia W.H. Harrison
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
April 4, 1841
March 4, 1845
Tyler
11 George Mifflin Dallas 1848 crop.png George M. Dallas
July 10, 1792 – December 31, 1864
(aged 72)
Pennsylvania March 4, 1845
March 4, 1849
Democratic 15
(1844)
U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania Polk
12 Fillmore.jpg Millard Fillmore
January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874
(aged 74)
New York March 4, 1849
July 9, 1850
Whig 16
(1848)
14th
New York State Comptroller
Taylor
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
July 9, 1850
March 4, 1853
Fillmore
13 William R. D. King Vice President.jpg William R. King
April 7, 1786 – April 18, 1853
(aged 67)
Alabama March 4, 1853[n 2]
April 18, 1853
Democratic 17
(1852)
President pro tempore of the Senate Pierce
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
April 18, 1853
March 4, 1857
14 John C Breckinridge-04775-restored.jpg John C. Breckinridge
January 16, 1821 – May 17, 1875
(aged 54)
Kentucky March 4, 1857
March 4, 1861
Democratic 18
(1856)
U.S. Representative for
Kentucky's 8th
Buchanan
15 Hannibal Hamlin, photo portrait seated, c1860-65-retouched-crop.jpg Hannibal Hamlin
August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891
(aged 81)
Maine March 4, 1861
March 4, 1865
Republican 19
(1860)
26th
Governor of Maine
Lincoln
16 Johnson, Andrew Andrew Johnson
December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875
(aged 66)
Tennessee March 4, 1865
April 15, 1865
Democratic
National Union
20
(1864)
U.S. Senator from Tennessee
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
April 15, 1865
March 4, 1869
A. Johnson
17 Schuyler Colfax portrait.jpg Schuyler Colfax
March 23, 1823 – January 13, 1885
(aged 61)
Indiana March 4, 1869
March 4, 1873
Republican 21
(1868)
25th
Speaker of the House
Grant
18 Wilson, Henry Henry Wilson
February 16, 1812 – November 22, 1875
(aged 63)
Massachusetts March 4, 1873
November 22, 1875
Republican 22
(1872)
U.S. Senator from Massachusetts
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
November 22, 1875
March 4, 1877
19 Wheeler, William A. William A. Wheeler
June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887
(aged 67)
New York March 4, 1877
March 4, 1881
Republican 23
(1876)
U.S. Representative for
New York's 19th
Hayes
20 Arthur, Chester A. Chester A. Arthur
October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886
(aged 57)
New York March 4, 1881
September 19, 1881
Republican 24
(1880)
21st
Collector of the Port of New York
Garfield
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
September 19, 1881
March 4, 1885
Arthur
21 Hendricks, Thomas Thomas A. Hendricks
September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885
(aged 66)
Indiana March 4, 1885
November 25, 1885
Democratic 25
(1884)
16th
Governor of Indiana
Cleveland
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
November 25, 1885
March 4, 1889
22 Morton, Levi Levi P. Morton
May 16, 1824 – May 16, 1920
(aged 96)
New York March 4, 1889
March 4, 1893
Republican 26
(1888)
31st
Governor of New York
B. Harrison
23 Stevenson, Adlai E. Adlai Stevenson
October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914
(aged 78)
Illinois March 4, 1893
March 4, 1897
Democratic 27
(1892)
U.S. Representative for
Illinois' 13th
Cleveland
24 Hobart, Garret Garret Hobart
June 3, 1844 – November 21, 1899
(aged 55)
New Jersey March 4, 1897
November 21, 1899
Republican 28
(1896)
President of the New Jersey Senate McKinley
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
November 21, 1899
March 4, 1901
25 Roosevelt, Theodore Theodore Roosevelt
October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919
(aged 60)
New York March 4, 1901
September 14, 1901
Republican 29
(1900)
33rd
Governor of New York
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
September 14, 1901
March 4, 1905
T. Roosevelt
26 Fairbanks, Charles W. Charles W. Fairbanks
May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918
(aged 66)
Indiana March 4, 1905
March 4, 1909
Republican 30
(1904)
U.S. Senator from Indiana
27 Sherman, James S. James S. Sherman
October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912
(aged 57)
New York March 4, 1909
October 30, 1912
Republican 31
(1908)
U.S. Representative for
New York's 27th
Taft
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by death)
October 30, 1912
March 4, 1913
28 Marshall, Thomas R. Thomas R. Marshall
March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925
(aged 71)
Indiana March 4, 1913
March 4, 1921
Democratic 32
(1912)
27th
Governor of Indiana
Wilson
33
(1916)
29 Coolidge, Calvin Calvin Coolidge
July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933
(aged 60)
Massachusetts March 4, 1921
August 2, 1923
Republican 34
(1920)
48th
Governor of Massachusetts
Harding
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
August 2, 1923
March 4, 1925
Coolidge
30 Dawes, Charles G. Charles G. Dawes
August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951
(aged 85)
Illinois March 4, 1925
March 4, 1929
Republican 35
(1924)
Director of the Bureau of the Budget[n 3]
31 Curtis, Charles Charles Curtis
January 25, 1860 – February 8, 1936
(aged 76)
Kansas March 4, 1929
March 4, 1933
Republican 36
(1928)
Senate Majority Leader from Kansas Hoover
32 Garner, John Nance John Nance Garner
November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967
(aged 98)
Texas March 4, 1933
January 20, 1941
Democratic 37
(1932)
39th
Speaker of the House
F.D. Roosevelt
38
(1936)
33 Wallace, Henry A. Henry A. Wallace
October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965
(aged 77)
Iowa January 20, 1941
January 20, 1945
Democratic 39
(1940)
11th
Secretary of Agriculture
34 Truman, Harry S. Harry S. Truman
May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972
(aged 88)
Missouri January 20, 1945
April 12, 1945
Democratic 40
(1944)
U.S. Senator from Missouri
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
April 12, 1945
January 20, 1949
Truman
35 Barkley, Alben Alben W. Barkley
November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956
(aged 78)
Kentucky January 20, 1949
January 20, 1953
Democratic 41
(1948)
U.S. Senator from Kentucky
36 Nixon, Richard Richard Nixon
January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994
(aged 81)
California January 20, 1953
January 20, 1961
Republican 42
(1952)
U.S. Senator from California Eisenhower
43
(1956)
37 Johnson, Lyndon B. Lyndon B. Johnson
August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973
(aged 64)
Texas January 20, 1961
November 22, 1963
Democratic 44
(1960)
Senate Majority Leader
from Texas
Kennedy
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
November 22, 1963
January 20, 1965
L. Johnson
38 Humphrey, Hubert H. Hubert Humphrey
May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978
(aged 66)
Minnesota January 20, 1965
January 20, 1969
Democratic 45
(1964)
Senate Majority Whip from Minnesota
39 Agnew, Spiro T. Spiro Agnew
November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996
(aged 77)
Maryland January 20, 1969
October 10, 1973
Republican 46
(1968)
55th
Governor of Maryland
Nixon
47
(1972)
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by resignation)
October 10, 1973
December 6, 1973
40 Ford, Gerald Gerald Ford
July 14, 1913 – December 26, 2006
(aged 93)
Michigan December 6, 1973[n 4]
August 9, 1974
Republican House Minority Leader from
Michigan's 5th
N/A US Vice President Seal.svg    Vacant
(by ascension)
August 9, 1974
December 19, 1974
Ford
41 Rockefeller, Nelson Nelson Rockefeller
July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979
(aged 70)
New York December 19, 1974[n 5]
January 20, 1977
Republican 49th
Governor of New York
42 Mondale, Walter Walter Mondale
(1928-01-05) January 5, 1928 (age 88)
Minnesota January 20, 1977
January 20, 1981
Democratic 48
(1976)
U.S. Senator from Minnesota Carter
43 Bush, George Herbert Walker George H. W. Bush
(1924-06-12) June 12, 1924 (age 92)
[3]
Texas January 20, 1981
January 20, 1989
Republican 49
(1980)
11th
Director of Central Intelligence
Reagan
50
(1984)
44 Quayle, Dan Dan Quayle
(1947-02-04) February 4, 1947 (age 69)
Indiana January 20, 1989
January 20, 1993
Republican 51
(1988)
U.S. Senator from Indiana G.H.W. Bush
45 Gore, Al Al Gore
(1948-03-31) March 31, 1948 (age 68)
Tennessee January 20, 1993
January 20, 2001
Democratic 52
(1992)
U.S. Senator from Tennessee Clinton
53
(1996)
46 Cheney, Dick Dick Cheney
(1941-01-30) January 30, 1941 (age 75)
[4]
Wyoming January 20, 2001
January 20, 2009
Republican 54
(2000)
17th
United States Secretary of Defense
G.W. Bush
55
(2004)
47 Biden, Joe Joe Biden
(1942-11-20) November 20, 1942 (age 73)
Delaware January 20, 2009
Incumbent
Democratic 56
(2008)
U.S. Senator from Delaware Obama
57
(2012)

Living former vice presidents[edit]

As of July 2016, there are five living former vice presidents of the United States, the oldest being George H. W. Bush (1981–1989, born 1924). The most recent death of a former vice president was that of Gerald Ford (1973–1974), on December 26, 2006. The most recently serving vice president to die was Nelson Rockefeller (1974–1977) on January 26, 1979. Pictured below, listed in order of service:

Vice presidents who became presidents[edit]

A timeline graph of Presidents with a highlighting of those who had been Vice Presidents. A gray arrow points to those who became president without having been elected as president. The double arrow indicates Ford becoming president without having been elected as vice president also. (See source image for more info.)

There have been 14 vice presidents who subsequently became President of the United States.

Of the nine vice presidents who ascended to the presidency after their predecessor's death or resignation, only 4 were subsequently elected in their own right: Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, Harry S. Truman, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Only 3 vice presidents have been elected president once, and then defeated in reelection: John Adams, Martin Van Buren, and George H.W. Bush. Only 2 vice presidents have ever been elected and reelected president: Thomas Jefferson and Richard Nixon (only Jefferson served two full terms). Richard Nixon is the only one on this list who was not serving as vice president when he was elected. Gerald Ford was the only vice president who became president by ascension, secured his party's nomination, and then lost in the general election.

Vice presidents who later served in other offices[edit]

Other facts[edit]

  • George Clinton and John C. Calhoun are the only vice presidents who have served under more than one president.
  • There have only been 12 men elected Vice President twice: Adams, Tompkins, Marshall, Garner, Nixon, Agnew, Bush, Gore, Cheney, Biden (each serving under one president), and Clinton and Calhoun (with different presidents.) Clinton, Calhoun, and Agnew did not complete their second terms.
  • From the end of Daniel Tompkins's second term in 1825, no vice president served two complete terms until Thomas Marshall took office in 1913, a gap of 88 years.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ For the purposes of numbering, a presidency is defined as an uninterrupted period of time in office served by one person. For example, George Washington served two consecutive terms and is counted as the first president (not the first and second). Upon the resignation of 37th president Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford became the 38th president even though he simply served out the remainder of Nixon's second term and was never elected to the presidency in his own right. Grover Cleveland was both the 22nd president and the 24th president because his two terms were not consecutive. A period during which a vice-president temporarily becomes acting president under the Twenty-fifth Amendment is not a presidency, because the president remains in office during such a period.
  2. ^ The only Vice President to be sworn in outside of the United States of America (in Havana, Cuba), with special dispensation from Congress; twenty days after the original vice-presidential inauguration.
  3. ^ Dawes was an experienced economist whose first elected office was Vice President.
  4. ^ Ford was appointed Vice President under section 2 of the 25th Amendment.
  5. ^ Rockefeller was appointed Vice President under section 2 of the 25th Amendment.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Vice President of the United States (President of the Senate)". United States Senate. Retrieved June 10, 2009. 
  2. ^ Blumenthal, Sidney (June 28, 2007). "The imperial vice presidency". Salon.com. Retrieved September 22, 2007. 
  3. ^ Bush served as Acting President under section 3 of the 25th Amendment on July 13, 1985, from 11:28 a.m. until 7:22 p.m.
  4. ^ Cheney served as Acting President under section 3 of the 25th Amendment, for a few hours on June 29, 2002 and July 21, 2007.

External links[edit]