List of Washburn Ichabods head football coaches

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Bennie Owen coached at Washburn for the 1900 season before going to the Bethany Terrible Swedes and later the Oklahoma Sooners. He ended his career with a record of 155–60–19 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

The Washburn Ichabods football program is a college football team that represents Washburn University in the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association, a part of NCAA Division II. The team has had 38 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1891.[1] The current coach is Craig Schurig who first took the position for the 2002 season.[2][3]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
No. Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

Statistics correct as of the end of the 2017 college football season.

No. Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs NCs Awards
0 Unknown 1891–1893 10 2 8 0 .200 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 W. M. Gains 1894 5 3 2 0 .600
X no team 1894
2 W. Griffith 1896 9 7 1 1 .833
3 Paul Coldren 1897–1898 19 15 3 1 .816 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4 William Melford 1899 9 2 5 2 .333
5 Bennie Owen 1900 8 6 2 0 .750
6 Lawrence Banks 1901 8 2 3 3 .438
7 H. Ward Page 1902 8 3 5 0 .375
8 A. R. Kennedy 1903 8 7 0 1 .938
9 John H. Outland 1904–1905 20 14 5 1 .725
10 Garfield Weede 1906–1908 32 22 6 4 .750 1
11 Robert Stewart 1909–1910 16 8 8 0 .500
12 William L. Driver 1911–1912 18 9 8 1 .528
13 Glen Gray 1913–1915 25 11 11 3 .500
14 A. R. Kennedy 1916–1917 19 5 12 2 .316
15 Ernest Bearg 1918–1919 14 11 2 1 .821
16 Dwight Ream 1920–1921 19 7 8 4 .474
17 Glenn D. Vosburg 1922 9 1 7 1 .167
18 George Woodward 1923–1926 34 7 23 4 .265
19 Roy Wynne 1927–1928 17 3 14 0 .176
20 Ernest Bearg 1929–1935 71 37 31 3 .542 1
21 Elmer Holm 1936–1941 57 23 31 3 .430
22 Bob Raugh 1942–1943 16 3 11 2 .250
23 Dee Errikson 1944 7 1 6 0 .143
24 Lew Lane 1945 6 4 2 0 .667
25 Dick Godlove 1946–1958 26 16 8 2 .654 3
26 Ralph Brown 1959–1961 27 10 17 0 .370
27 Ellis Rainsberger 1962–1964 27 16 11 0 .593 1
28 Ed Linta 1965–1966 18 4 13 1 .250
29 Bill Schaake 1967–1968 18 2 16 0 .111
30 Harold Elliott 1969–1970 20 10 8 2 .550
31 Bob Noblitt 1971–1973 30 11 18 1 .383
32 Larry Elliott 1974–1978 51 29 21 1 .578 1 1
33 Gary Hampton 1979–1980 20 6 14 0 .300
34 Glenn Jagodzinske 1981–1982 20 4 16 0 .200
35 George Tardiff 1983–1984 20 10 10 0 .500 1
36 Larry Elliott 1984–1989 65 23 42 0 .354 1
37 Dennis Caryl 1990–1993 39 7 32 0 .179
38 Andy Williams 1993 2 0 2 0 .000
39 Tony DeMeo 1994–2001 85 32 53 0 .376
40 Craig Schurig 2002–present 96 108 73 0 .599 91 63 .591 1 3 1

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[4]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[5]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shafer, Ian. "Washburn University (All seasons results)". College Football Reference. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ DeLassus, David. "Washburn (KS) Records by Year (incomplete data)". College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved March 16, 2013. 
  3. ^ "2007 Football Media Guide" (PDF). Washburn University. Retrieved March 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  6. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009.