List of Williams College people

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Williams College
MottoE liberalitate E. Williams, armigeri
Motto in English
"Through the Generosity of E. Williams, Esquire"[1]
TypePrivate
Established1793 (227 years ago) (1793)
Endowment$2.89 billion (2019)
PresidentMaud Mandel
Administrative staff
363 (Fall 2019)
Undergraduates2,025 (Fall 2019)
Postgraduates56 (Fall 2019)
Location, ,
United States
CampusRural, college town; total 450 acres
AthleticsEphs
MascotThe Purple Cow
Websitewww.williams.edu

Williams College is a private liberal arts college in Williamstown, Massachusetts, United States. It was established in 1793 with funds from the estate of Ephraim Williams, a colonist from the Province of Massachusetts Bay who was killed in the French and Indian War in 1755. Alumni of the college are listed below.

Academia[edit]

A–F
G–M
N–Z

Actors, architects, artists, and filmmakers[edit]

A–M
N–Z

Business[edit]

A–M
N–Z

Curators, archaeologists and museum directors[edit]

Many were trained and deeply inspired by Whitney Stoddard, and S. Lane Faison, who headed the art history department at Williams from 1940 to 1969. Referred to as the "Williams Art Mafia" by the New York Times, Williams College art history graduates have maintained a long history of involvement and directorship in the most prominent museums, art trusts, and galleries in the United States.

Government officials and political notables[edit]

Ambassadors, diplomats, and bureaucrats[edit]

Governors and state politicians[edit]

Legislature (state and national)[edit]

A–F
G–M
N–Z

Municipal[edit]

Presidents, prime ministers, and cabinet positions[edit]

Royalty[edit]

Judiciary and legal[edit]

A–M
N–Z

Medicine[edit]

Military[edit]

Music[edit]

Religion[edit]

Science, technology, and engineering[edit]

Sports[edit]

Trustees[edit]

Writing, journalism, and advocacy[edit]

A–F
G–M
N–Z

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Latin word armiger means literally "armour carrier"; in the Middle Ages it meant a knight's shield-bearer or "squire"; by the 18th century it was used to translate Esquire, a rank which by then meant a man holding one of various offices, including military commissions.
  2. ^ "Richard T. Antoun, Ph.D". Legacy.com. Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin. December 7–8, 2009. Archived from the original on September 4, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2012. Following his graduation from Williams in 1953, he completed a Masters' degree from Johns Hopkins University in International Relations.
  3. ^ Basler, George; Tom Wilber (December 4, 2009). "Prof. Richard Antoun Remembered as Gentle Man Dedicated to Dispelling Stereotypes about Different Cultures". PressConnects.com. Archived from the original on September 4, 2012. Before beginning his career as a faculty member, Antoun earned a bachelor's degree from Williams College, a master's degree from Johns Hopkins University and a doctorate from Harvard University.
  4. ^ "About Bernard Bailyn". Harvard.edu. Archived from the original on September 4, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2012. Professor Bailyn received the A.B. degree from Williams College in 1945...
  5. ^ "John Bascom and Mount Greylock". MarkRondeau.com. Archived from the original on September 4, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2012.
  6. ^ "James Phinney Baxter, 3rd (1893–1975)". Williams College Archives. Archived from the original on September 4, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2012.
  7. ^ "Baxter Fellows". Williams College Office of Student Life. Archived from the original on September 4, 2012. Retrieved September 4, 2012.
  8. ^ "Term: Chadbourne, Paul Ansel 1823–1883". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved September 26, 2012.
  9. ^ a b https://communications.williams.edu/news-releases/williams-alumni-honor-president-emeritus-carl-vogt/. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ http://www.businessinsider.com/equity-films-sarah-megan-thomas-on-wall-street-and-women-2016-7. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ "Alex Fort Brescia". World Economic Forum. Retrieved December 25, 2017.
  12. ^ "Report on Claim High Campaign" (PDF). Williams College.
  13. ^ Coral, Cecilia. "50 Latina Tech Founders — The Stats". Medium. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  14. ^ Kennedy, Randy (June 14, 2010). "James N. Wood, President of the Getty Trust, Dies at 69". The New York Times. Retrieved June 21, 2010.
  15. ^ "Minnesota Governor Arne Helge Carlson". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  16. ^ "New Jersey Governor Alfred Eastlack Driscoll". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  17. ^ "Massachusetts Governor Joseph Buell Ely". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  18. ^ "Vermont Governor Philip Henderson Hoff". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  19. ^ "Pennsylvania Governor Henry Martyn Hoyt". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  20. ^ "New York Governor Herbert Henry Lehman". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  21. ^ "James Miller (1776–1851)". The Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  22. ^ "Vermont Governor John Staniford Robinson". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  23. ^ "Rhode Island Governor Bruce G. Sundlun". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  24. ^ "Virginia Governor Gilbert Carlton Walker". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  25. ^ "Massachusetts Governor Emory Washburn". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  26. ^ "Vermont Governor Charles Kilborn Williams". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  27. ^ "Maine Governor William Durkee Williamson". National Governors Association. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  28. ^ "Elisha Hunt Allen". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  29. ^ "Chester Ashley". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  30. ^ "Daniel Barnard". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  31. ^ "Samuel Rossiter Betts". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  32. ^ "Lewis Bigelow". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  33. ^ "Victory Birdseye". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  34. ^ "Bernard Blair". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  35. ^ "Samuel Augustus Bridges". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  36. ^ "Edward Espenett Case". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  37. ^ "Alfred Clark Chapin". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  38. ^ "Timothy Childs". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  39. ^ "Horace Francis Clark". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  40. ^ "John C. Clark". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  41. ^ "Ernest Harold Cluett". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  42. ^ "Rodolphus Dickinson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  43. ^ "MICHAEL DIVELY AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AWARD ENDOWMENT". Grand Traverse Regional Community Foundation. Retrieved August 21, 2016.
  44. ^ "James Dixon". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  45. ^ "Michael Edward Driscoll". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  46. ^ "Henry Williams Dwight". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  47. ^ "William H. Gest". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  48. ^ "Charles Ellsworth Goodell". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  49. ^ "Byram Green". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  50. ^ "Aaron Hackley, Jr". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  51. ^ "Moses Hayden". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  52. ^ "Abner Hazeltine". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  53. ^ "John P. Hiler". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  54. ^ "John James Ingalls". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  55. ^ "Ferris Jacobs, Jr". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  56. ^ "Edward Aloysius Kenney". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  57. ^ "Samuel Knox". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  58. ^ "Addison Henry Laflin". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  59. ^ "Henry C. Martindale". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  60. ^ "Robert McClellan". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  61. ^ "Stephen C. Millard". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  62. ^ "Elijah H. Mills". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  63. ^ "Chris Murphy". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  64. ^ "Jesse O. Norton". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  65. ^ "Abram B. Olin". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  66. ^ "Frank C. Osmers, Jr". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  67. ^ "John G. Otis". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  68. ^ "John Palmer". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 4, 2012.
  69. ^ "Job Pierson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  70. ^ "James Porter". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  71. ^ "Edward Rogers". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  72. ^ "Henry W. Seymour". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  73. ^ "Jonathan Sloane". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  74. ^ "Horace B. Smith". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  75. ^ "George N. Southwick". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  76. ^ "John B. Steele". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  77. ^ "Solomon Strong". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  78. ^ "Mark Udall". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  79. ^ "Samuel Finley Vinton". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  80. ^ "William Lowndes Yancey". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  81. ^ Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Williams College Retrieved 3 December 2019.
  82. ^ "Dave Clawson Bio". wakeforestsports.com. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  83. ^ "Scott Endecott Perry". Pro-Football-Reference.Com. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  84. ^ SI 60 Q&A: Tim Layden on Mike Reily and an athlete dying young Retrieved 3 December 2019.

External links[edit]

Media related to Alumni of Williams College at Wikimedia Commons