List of YMCA buildings

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This is a list of notable YMCA buildings. Buildings for YMCA use are prominent in many cities and towns.

Canada (Dominion of)[edit]

India (Republic of)[edit]

Singapore[edit]

United Kingdom (Great Britain: England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland (Ulster)[edit]

United States[edit]

(by state/territory, then city):

Minneapolis YMCA Central Building, a skyscraper from 1919
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Georgia
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
  • Whitaker Family YMCA of Central Kentucky (Lexington, Kentucky)
  • North Lexington YMCA of Central Kentucky (Lexington, Kentucky)
  • Carol Martin Gatton Beaumont YMCA of Central Kentucky (Lexington, Kentucky)
  • High St YMCA of Central Kentucky (Lexington, Kentucky)
Louisiana
Cumberland YMCA, (C. William Gilchrist Center)
Maryland
  • Baltimore, Maryland, Oldest Central Building of the Y.M.C.A. constructed 1872-73, a triangular structure of five stories in "Second Empire" style architecture with brick and stone trim, slate mansard roof with large corner central tower and several smaller towers (later removed in early 1900s remodeling), at the northwest corner of West Saratoga and North Charles Street, on the northwest edge of downtown Baltimore. Former historic site of the first Roman Catholic Parish (1770) and Pro-Cathedral of St. Peter's in the new Diocese of Baltimore, which is the first established ("erected") diocese in America with first bishop John Carroll in 1789-90 (built of simple red brick, in Georgian/Federal style with attached rectory and surrounding cemetery), and served as America's first Cathedral until 1821 when the new Baltimore Cathedral designed by Latrobe, several blocks north was dedicated. Designed by famed local architects Neilson and Niernsee, just a few blocks east from where the local Y.M.C.A. was first established in Baltimore in the 1850s. Old Central Y.M.C.A. was across Charles Street from the first church in the city and metropolitan area, Old St. Paul's Anglican (Episcopal) Church, founded 1692 in southeastern Baltimore County and later relocated to the southeast corner of Charles and Saratoga when Baltimore Town was first laid out in 1729-30. The Old 19th Century Y.M.C.A. was later converted into offices in the 1920s when the Association moved several blocks north to West Franklin Street on "Cathedral Hill". On the northeastern edge of the massive downtown "urban renewal" project of "Charles Center" from 1958 to the middle 1970s, spared this unique structure although two elaborate marble/granite banks across West Saratoga Street to the southwest were demolished to be replaced by two twin apartment skyscraper towers and "Charles Plaza", with a movie theatre and commercial shops. Additional interior restoration/renovation on the building was done in the early 1980s and again in 2013 when it was converted into apartments/condos.
  • Cumberland YMCA, Cumberland, Maryland, listed on the NRHP in Maryland[1] (C. William Gilchrist Center).
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
  • Minneapolis YMCA Central Building, Minneapolis, Minnesota, a 12-story skyscraper building in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota built in 1919. It was built in the Late "Gothic Revival" style of architecture, making it stand out from other buildings. The Gothic styling was chosen to emphasize the vertical mass of the structure and to make it appear as a powerful corporate symbol. The styling also brought a symbolic association with church architecture, making it fit into the Y.M.C.A.'s value system.[2]
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
New Jersey
New York
North Carolina
Ohio

Alliance, Ohio YMCA Building

Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
Tennessee
Texas
Washington
Wisconsin

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ "Y.M.C.A. Central Building". Minneapolis Heritage Preservation Commission. February 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-27. 
  3. ^ AIA Guide to Columbus, Ohio